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Diario de Pernambuco Now Online, 1825 – 1863

The Latin American Collections in the Special & Area Studies Collections Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida are proud to announce the online launch of the Diario de Pernambuco, starting with the first issue on November 7, 1825 through March 1863.

The Diario de Pernambuco is acknowledged as the oldest newspaper in circulation in Latin America.  The issues from 1825-1923 offer insights into early Brazilian commerce, social affairs, politics, family life, slavery, and such. Published in the port of Recife, Brazil, the Diario contains numerous announcements of maritime movements, crop production, legal affairs, and cultural matters. The 19th century includes reporting on the rise of Brazilian nationalism as the Empire gave way to the earliest expressions of the Brazilian republic. The 1910s and 1920s are years of economic and artistic change, with surging exports of sugar and coffee pushing revenues and allowing for rapid expansions of infrastructure, popular expression, and national politics.

 See the Diario de Pernambuco in the UF Smathers Libraries’ South American Digital Collections here: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00011611

 The Diario de Pernambuco is held by very few libraries, and only on microfilm, making it difficult to conduct research and even to access this important publication. Recognizing this critical need, Richard Phillips, Head of the Latin American Collections at UF, proposed and was awarded funding to conduct the first phase of this project. The first phase of the digital project to digitize the Diario de Pernambuco is now complete with the first issue from November 7, 1825 through March 1863 now all openly online for worldwide access. The Latin American Collection has submitted a proposal for funding a second phase of this important project.

Funding for the digitization of Diario de Pernambuco provided by LAMP (formerly known as the Latin American Microform Project), which is coordinated by the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), Global Resources Network. Ongoing support for the open, full, and free online access and permanent digital preservation provided by the UF Smathers Libraries.

Note: The functionalities and features of the [UF Digital Collections or Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)] are supported using the UF-developed SobekCM software. SobekCM is released as open source software under the GNU GPL license and can be downloaded from the SobekCM Software Download Site: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/software.  To learn more about the technologies, please visit the SobekCM page: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm.]

Contacts:

Richard Phillips, Head of the Latin American Collections, ricphil@uflib.ufl.edu, 352-273-2746

Laurie Taylor, UF Digital Collections, Laurien@ufl.edu, 352-273-2902

University of Florida Celebrates 80 Years of Latin American Studies

Gainesville, FL – The University of Florida (UF) proudly celebrates 80 years of teaching, research and service in Latin American Studies. The anniversary will be marked by a series of public events from March 24-26, 2011. The events include the dedication of a historical marker on the Plaza of the Americas, an academic conference, a Latin American career symposium, several art and cultural exhibits, and a gala reception. Full details can be found online at: http://www.latam.ufl.edu/News/conference.stm.

At UF’s commencement ceremonies on June 2, 1930, President John J. Tigert announced the creation of the Institute for Inter-American Affairs (IIAA), the first research center in the United States to focus on Latin America. Interest in Latin America at UF was, and still is, a natural result of Florida’s geographical proximity to the Caribbean and South America, its Spanish heritage, and its large Spanish-speaking population.

The IIAA’s inaugural conference was held in 1931 as part of the celebratory events marking the university’s 25th year in Gainesville. UF’s Plaza of the Americas was dedicated at the closing ceremony by planting 21 live oaks on the university quadrangle, one for each of the republics of the Americas at the time. Over the subsequent decades the IIAA evolved into what is known today as the Center for Latin American Studies. In 1961, UF’s Latin American program was among the first in the country to be designated a National Resource Center by the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) under its new Title VI program. It has been funded through Title VI ever since.

UF faculty members have been a force behind the development of the field of Latin American Studies nationally. The Handbook of Latin American Studies, the premier bibliography on the region, was published by the University Press of Florida from 1949-1978. The inaugural meeting of the Seminar on the Acquisition of Library Materials (SALALM) was hosted by UF in 1954. Also, three UF faculty members have served as president of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), the largest professional association in the world for individuals studying Latin America.

The mission of the Center for Latin American Studies is to advance knowledge about Latin America and the Caribbean and its peoples throughout the hemisphere. With over 170 faculty from colleges across UF, the Center is one of the largest institutions internationally for interdisciplinary research, teaching and outreach on Latin America, Caribbean, and Latino Studies.

This press release was reprinted with permission.

Hannah Covert
University of Florida Libraries

 

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