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Meet Bruce Bachand, Fall 2012 SALALM Scholarship Winner!

Dr. Bruce Bachand, masters student of Library and Information Science at University of Kentucky.

Bruce Bachand is an anthropologist (Ph.D. University of Arizona) who is looking to apply his subject area knowledge of Mesoamerica, Spanish language ability, and love of libraries and archival research to a productive and fulfilling career as a librarian-scholar for an academic library. He is finishing his master’s degree in Library and Information science at the University of Kentucky, concentrating in academic libraries. Bruce is particularly interested in collection development, embedded or “field” librarianship, authority control, archives, digital repositories, FRBR, and the Semantic Web.  In graduate school, he has researched and written essays on authority control in archives, folksonomies, and subject specialist Ph.D.s in the profession. As an anthropologist, educator and librarian, he has a profound interest in understanding how society’s insatiable appetite for quick information is impacting scholarship and learning.

Internships with the Mountain West Digital Library and Hispanic American Periodicals Index (HAPI) have afforded him special opportunities to learn about digital library consortia and online databases. Through these opportunities, he has grasped principles of metadata interoperability, digital asset management systems, open access, and bibliometrics. This March, Bruce will apply this knowledge in a one week internship at the Library of Congress.

His experiences as a scientist intersect with his recent training in librarianship. This complementarity surfaces in his writing. In his recent bibliometric analysis of Latin American serials for HAPI, Bruce incorporates his direct scholarly experience with four HAPI journals to make a case for developing a partly qualitative approach to assessing journal quality, excellence, and value (to be presented with Orchid Mazurkiewicz at SALALM 2013). His background also pervades a recent essay on anthropology libraries, now under review by Behavioral and Social Sciences Librarian. He has written a thesaurus of terms for Zoque Indian culture that he hopes to soon publish as an illustrated dictionary, and is collaborating with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to revive the Bibliografía Mesoamericana, a free online bibliographic database for Mesoamerican research.

Bruce has published various articles on ancient Maya and Olmec society. He has received grants from the National Science Foundation and National Geographic Society, and was a Fulbright Scholar in Mexico during 2009-2010. In May 2010, his field team was featured in the New York Times for their discovery of the oldest tomb yet found in a Mesoamerican pyramid, a find published with Mexican colleague Lynneth Lowe in Arqueología Mexicana (2011) and in a forthcoming volume by Brigham Young University’s New World Archaeological Foundation.

Looking forward, Bruce envisions himself working with collection development and subject specialist reference for anthropology and Latin American studies. He believes, however, that academic libraries will be challenged in the coming decades as they aim to strike a sustainable balance between ownership and access of materials and provide point-of-need reference services. He sees subject knowledge of library practitioners becoming of greater value with information resources multiplying at an exponential rate. By planting a foot in both the librarian and scholarly worlds he hopes to forge more seamless collaborations between departments and libraries, especially as academic boundaries dissolve and new information needs emerge such as data curation and open access publishing.

Meet David Fernández, SALALM Scholarship Winner!

David Fernández is the SALALM Scholarship winner of $1,000 for the 2012 spring semester. Many thanks to our anonymous donor who made this award possible.

Peter Johnson
Scholarship Committee

David Férnandez, master’s student in Library Science, Book History and Print  Culture at the Faculty of Information in the University of Toronto.

 

David Fernández was born in Venezuela, and moved to Canada in 2004. He is a master’s student in Library Science, Book History and Print Culture at the Faculty of Information in the University of Toronto. David holds an Honours B.A in Latin American Studies with a specialization in contemporary Latin American literature. He is the co-director of ¿Oye, qué bolá? Cuban Voices on Sexual Diversity (2009), a documentary that brings together a range of energetic and sincere voices discussing sexual diversity in 21st Century Cuba. He is also the winner of the 2010 Hoeniger Book Collection Prize for his collection which connects the texts of a select group of Latin American writers with the works of writers from other regions and literary traditions.

David takes a multidisciplinary approach to the study of information; he is particularly interested in the history of the book as well as print cultures, textual studies, digital humanities, and information literacy. He also continues to study and collect books on contemporary Latin American queer literature. David’s research interests are motivated by his passion to promote the study of Latin American literatures, cultures, and societies in Canada. He believes that there is an enormous potential for librarians in North America to foster new knowledge in the area of Latin American Studies. His goal as a librarian is to build bridges of collaboration among academics, librarians, and students through academic projects such as digital anthologies of Latin American works, and resource- sharing between libraries, archives, and universities across North America and Latin America.

Meet the 2011 SALALM Scholarship Winners!

Lisa Cruces, masters student in Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin

Lisa Cruces has been a scholar and professional specializing in Latin American materials for the last 7 years. Her specific interests include archival enterprise, special collections and non-textual materials relevant to the Latin American sphere. After completing dual B.A. degrees in History and Latin American Studies at Texas State University-San Marcos in 2009, Lisa began her Masters of Science in Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin, concentrating in archival studies and librarianship.

Before beginning her graduate studies, Lisa conducted work in public history, exhibits, and libraries, with the shared goal of increasing scholarship and access to Spanish-language materials. Past work includes cataloging sueltas at the Harry Ransom Center Research Library and assisting the UT-Library System
with digitization projects.

Along with her previous work involving Mexico and El Salvador, Lisa traveled and conducted independent research in 2010 and 2011 on archival enterprise, preservation, and librarianship in Panama. She presented her poster, “A Case Study of Archives in Central America: El Archivo Nacional de Panamá” at the 2011 Annual Meetings of the Society of Southwest Archivists and the Society of
American Archivists.

Her most recent activities at the University of Texas include archival work, digital exhibits, and translation with the Benson Latin American Collection and the Human Rights Documentation Initiative.

 

Timothy Thompson, dual-degree master’s student in library science (MLS) and Latin American and Caribbean studies (MA) at Indiana University.

Timothy Thompson is a dual-degree master’s student in library science and Latin American and Caribbean studies at Indiana University. In his application essay, Tim highlighted his keen interest in both digital libraries and Brazilian studies, two areas that have gone hand in hand with his professional development as a librarian: within his MLS degree, he is also pursuing a digital libraries specialization, and his first two years of study at Indiana University were funded by consecutive Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships in Portuguese.

He has worked closely with Luis A. González, Indiana University’s Librarian for Latin American, Iberian, Latino, and Chicano-Riqueño Studies, under whose supervision he completed an internship centered on digital collection development. Using open-source reference management software, he helped implement a complete redesign of González’s Researching Brazil, an online gateway that provides a searchable index of Brazilian scholarly journals.
In 2010, Tim received a Boren Fellowship to spend the following year in Brazil. During the first half of 2011, he continued his study of advanced Portuguese and took language courses at the University of Brasília, where he also completed a graduate-level course in Information Architecture. Concurrently, he enrolled in an independent readings course supervised by González and wrote a review essay of 12 recent books related to library and information science in Brazil.

In April, he was selected to receive the 2011 Rovelstad Scholarship in International Librarianship, awarded annually by the Council on Library and Information Resources to sponsor travel to the IFLA World Library and Information Congress, held this year in San Juan, Puerto Rico. There, he was able to network and share his research interests with information professionals from throughout Ibero-America and the Caribbean.

During the latter half of the year, he conducted fieldwork for his master’s capstone project, which he will conclude during the upcoming semester. His research focuses on the contribution that digital libraries can make as educational resources supporting human development. He is undertaking an analysis of 13 major digital library initiatives in Brazil and has carried out a series of semi-structured interviews with project managers.

“The goal of my research is to determine the extent to which human development has formed part of the rationale for creating digital libraries in Brazil,” says Thompson. “My research is guided by the conviction that the expansion of digital information services can play a role in bridging the gap between libraries and local communities throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.”

With Cavan McCarthy (Louisiana State University, retired), he is currently co-authoring a chapter on Brazil for the second of a two-volume IFLA publication titled Libraries in the Early 21st Century: An International Perspective, scheduled for publication in early 2012.

Presidential Message October 2011

Dear SALALM members:

I would like to thank Daisy Dominguez and Melissa Gasparotto for all their work on the new SALALM website! As you know, the SALALM Newsletter has been incorporated into the site, and will no longer be published in print form. Several questions remain about content, advertising and updating of the site; these will be addressed throughout the year and at our next meeting. Please contact Daisy or Melissa if you notice any errors or omissions.

Planning is underway for the 57th annual meeting in Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago. As I hope all you know by now, we will meet June 16-19, 2012, and our theme will be Popular Culture: Arts and Social Change. Please see the complete description on the Conference section of this website. I look forward to your proposed papers, panels and presentations. I am also counting on your assistance in advertising the conference with colleagues at your institutions in the U.S. and elsewhere.

I am happy to report that the University of Miami and Florida International University have issued a joint invitation to SALALM for the 58th annual SALALM meeting in 2013. The Executive Committee has accepted this invitation on a provisional basis, pending the vote of the full Executive Board next June. We are very grateful to be able to rely on this early offer, which will aid considerably with future planning!

Please note that a new SALALM Scholarship has been established “to encourage professional and leadership development in Latin American and Caribbean Studies librarianship.” It is intended for master’s candidates in information or archival studies programs in the US. $1000 will be awarded annually, commencing in December 2011. The award will include a one-year SALALM membership. Please see the application on this website, and share it widely with colleagues in your area.

Lynn Shirey
Harvard University

SALALM Scholarship Now Open!

 The SALALM Scholarship has been established to encourage professional and leadership development in Latin American and Caribbean Studies librarianship. To be awarded annually commencing in December 2011, the $1000 is for a master’s candidate in an archival studies or ALA-accredited library or information studies program. For more information, visit the SALALM Scholarship page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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