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Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Lara Aase

Portrait of Lara Aase

Lara Aase will complete her MLIS at the University of Washington Information School in June 2016, with a focus on Ibero-American digital humanities, archives/special collections, and library materials and services for Spanish speakers. Her previous degrees include a BA in Music Performance and an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of New Mexico, and a PhD/ABD in Spanish Peninsular Golden Age Literature at the University of Toronto. In 2015 Lara was the recipient of the LIBROS Scholarship and an H.W. Wilson Scholarship. She is a member of AILA, ACRL, and ALA, and an active participant in SALALM’s Digital Scholarship in Latin America (DíScoLA) group and REFORMA’s Children in Crisis Task Force.

Currently, Lara also works with the San Diego Youth Symphony, where her participation involves teaching and research based on Venezuela’s Sistema to effect social change through music education. In the past, she has taught university-level Spanish, English as a Foreign Language, and Comparative Literature in Costa Rica, Canada, the US, and Tunisia (with the Peace Corps). Her library work has included Romance-language cataloging, rare books bibliography, academic library acquisitions, Spanish colonial manuscript transcription, scholarly journal editing and indexing, and public library programming and storytimes for Spanish-speaking families. In the future, she plans to serve marginalized communities by finding culturally appropriate ways to make humanities materials, particularly non-English and non-machine-readable materials, discoverable, accessible, and usable, both physically and online.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Daniel Arbino

Portrait of Daniel Arbino

Daniel Arbino is a graduate student at the University of Arizona’s iSchool pursuing a Master’s in Library and Information Science. He is a member of the Knowledge River, a program that specializes in diverse cultural practices within the field of Library and Information Sciences with a focus on Hispanic and Native American communities in the Southwest. Within that program he serves as a graduate assistant. He also volunteers at the Bartlett Library at the Museum of International Folk Art, where he has processed collections on New Mexican artists from the WPA era and New Mexican NEA National Heritage Fellowship recipients. This summer he will be participating in the Rare Book School fellowship program.

Daniel has a Ph.D. in Latin American Literatures and Cultures from the University of Minnesota (2013). His dissertation is titled Orphans of the Other America: Contesting Community in Twentieth-Century Caribbean Literatures. He has published articles, encyclopedia entries, and book reviews in the main journals in the field, such as Journal of Caribbean Literatures, Sargasso, PALARA, and Callaloo. His areas of focus include the African diaspora in the Caribbean and Latin America and representations and subversions of power in the regions. He also has experience as a college professor.

As a graduate student at the University of Arizona he has researched topics related to digitization initiatives in the Caribbean from a postcolonial perspective and digital preservation of Latin American photograph collections. After completing his degree, Daniel plans to work as a subject specialist at an academic library or special collections library where he can combine library and archival work.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Amanda Moreno

Portrait of Amanda Moreno

Amanda Moreno is an MA/MSLIS candidate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Library and Information Science at New York University and Long Island University. She will graduate from her coordinated master’s programs in May 2016, having received funding through NYU’s MacCraken Fellowship, the ALA Spectrum Scholars program, and the ARL Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce.

Graduating magna cum laude from the University of Miami in 2012 with degrees in Political Science, Psychology, and Spanish, she worked as an archives assistant at the university’s Cuban Heritage Collection, where she was first introduced to Latin American library and archival collections; this experience prompted her to pursue her graduate education in New York. She is currently a Collection Development Assistant for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU’s Bobst Library, where she helps grow the library’s Latin American collections and contributes to related reference and instruction efforts with the university’s undergraduate and graduate students. Her research and professional interests include Afro-Latin culture and community archives.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Hannivett Nabahe

Portrait of Hannivett Nabahe

Hannivett (Hanni) Nabahe is completing her Master’s of Library and Information Science with a concentration in Digital Information Management and a graduate certificate in Archival Studies at the University of Arizona. As a Knowledge River Scholar, she is committed to serving the information needs of Latino and Indigenous peoples, to fostering an understanding of information issues from the perspective of these communities, and to advocating for culturally sensitive information services in both libraries and archives.

Originally from Veracruz, Mexico, Hanni started her career eight years ago in the Pima County Public Library system, where she continues to serve as a library instructor. Since the start of her graduate studies, Hanni has had the chance to work at the University of Arizona Special Collections, first as a graduate assistant and, for the past year, as an ARL/SAA Mosaic Scholar. Her projects have included processing manuscript and born-digital Borderlands collections with extensive Spanish content, translating their first finding aids available in Spanish, and collaborating on a pilot project that hopes to create a sustainable way to provide bilingual access points by bringing together archivists and translators-in-training. A former copresident of the University of Arizona Chapter of the American Indian Library Association, she assisted the director of the Old Pascua Yaqui Museum and Cultural Center in developing a disaster plan and is currently working on a digital preservation plan for the museum’s audiovisual materials.

Last summer, Hanni worked at UC San Diego’s Special Collections and Archives as an ARL Career Enhancement Fellow and attended the Archival Education and Research Institute as an Emerging Archival Scholar. The summer before that, she attended the American Indian Language Development Institute, focusing on Tohono O’odham linguistics and learning to develop mobile apps for use in indigenous language revitalization. Hanni holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a focus on Multicultural Literature from Brigham Young University, where she also studied Portuguese for two years, immersed in the language while living in BYU’s renowned language houses.

After her graduation this May, Hanni will spend the summer preparing for the Academy of Certified Archivists examination, presenting at the National Diversity in Libraries and the Society of American Archivists conferences, as well as attending the IFLA World Library and Information Congress as a Congress Fellow. In the fall, Hanni will join the University of Arizona’s Eller School of Business to pursue a Master’s of Business Administration.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Emma Whittington

Portrait of Emma Whittington

Emma Whittington is a dual-degree master’s candidate at the University of Texas, where she studies at both the School of Information and the Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies. She is in her second semester of the program and plans to concentrate in Archival Studies. She also works as a Circulation Student Assistant at the Benson Latin American Collection.

Emma received her bachelor’s degree in Comparative Literature from the University of Virginia, where she completed an honor’s thesis about the publication history of Borges’s Ficciones. After graduating in 2012, she worked for the Rare Book School at UVa before spending a year living and working in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Her research interests include postcustodial archives, collection development, and the bibliotecas obreras of Argentina.

A first-timer’s reflections on SALALM LX

For me, attending SALALM LX was an invaluable professional experience. I was able to get a real sense for how the organization functions, the important work that SALALMistas do, and how I could apply my own skills to contribute to the field in the future.

I attended many of the committee meetings during the initial days of the conference and I found this introduction to be extremely informative. Before attending SALALM, I had only a vague idea of what SALALM members did. I thought the job simply consisted of collecting Spanish-language resources, when in reality it entails a high degree of critical thinking and strategic planning. For example, in the SIS meeting (formerly ISIS), we discussed how materials related to the “15 de Mayo” movement in Spain would soon be in high demand as members of that movement rise to positions of national power and influence. We also discussed possible collaborations with other organizations with similar agendas (Association of Contemporary Iberian Studies) as well as ongoing projects to which and from which SIS could contribute and learn (Spanish Immigrants in the United States). In the LANE meeting, members discussed the BorrowDirect Consortium and their collaborative efforts to collect materials from different regions in Brazil, while LASER members considered their plans to enhance collections of indigenous-language materials between their respective institutions. In the LAMP and LAARP meetings, I heard compelling appeals for funding for a variety of important projects, and it was in these meetings that I grasped the real significance of SALALM-funded initiatives to both current research and the historical record. At the same time, I learned how these committees make difficult but necessary funding decisions. Finally, at the Research and Instruction Services meeting, it was refreshing to hear panel members discuss the future of libraries with particular regard to “internationalization” and creating university courses based on library resources.

The panel sessions proved equally informative. I learned about the new initiatives and directions in Latin American librarianship from a host of participants from all over the world. In many cases, I also witnessed enriching exchanges of ideas as presenters discussed projects undertaken at their respective institutions and received feedback and questions from their peers. It was encouraging to see the high level of interest expressed by panel attendees and it truly felt like a mutually beneficial learning experience for all involved. I was also thrilled to hear the keynote presentation by Lilia Moritz Schwarcz, whose ideas about the symbolic power of libraries tie into my own dissertation research.

Of the numerous advantages of SALALM attendance, the opportunity to meet and learn from other SALALM members surely ranks among the best. I met so many welcoming, knowledgeable, and conscientious people at SALALM LX. In our conversations I learned about the professional responsibilities of Latin American librarianship, potential job openings in the future, as well as how to best position myself as a candidate for those jobs upon completing my Ph.D. and MLIS. I found that I could comfortably approach all SALALM members and everyone was more than happy to talk to me about their jobs and learn about my own training and experiences. I was fortunate enough to talk with some experienced SALALM members in addition to some newer members, both of whom offered different and valuable perspectives on the organization and the field in general. I also met many of the book vendors from Latin America and elsewhere with whom I hope to work someday.

To conclude, I feel very fortunate to have attended SALALM LX. As I near the end of my graduate career and consider the looming job market, it is encouraging to know that an organization like SALALM exists, one in which I can effectively utilize my particular skill set and training in efforts to improve research and access to Latin American resources. After the warm reception and rewarding conversations I had at SALALM, I definitely plan on returning to future conferences and I sincerely hope to one day contribute to the organization as a full-fledged member from a participating institution.

Meet the Spring 2015 SALALM Scholarship Winners!


Alda MigoniAlda Migoni is in her second year of graduate school at University of California, Los Angeles where she was awarded a graduate opportunity fellowship her first year. Alda is currently an ARL Diveristy Scholar as part of their Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce. She is pursuing a master’s in Latin American Studies and will master’s of Library and Information Science.

As an undergraduate at the University of Redlands, Alda spent a semester abroad in Peru. In Cusco, Alda developed her passion for preservation of oral histories and research on Latin American community organizing. Her professional interests include cultural heritage preservation, digital humanities, and reference. Alda works as a reference assistant at UCLA’s Powell library, where she provides research assistance as well as instruction on access to patrons. Alda also works with UCLA’s Portuguese and Spanish Department building and assessing their collection for a new reading room. She is currently pursuing a concentration in archives.


Ashley_Larson_scholarshipAshley Larson is a first-year master’s degree student in UCLA’s Library and Information Science program. Originally from Nebraska, Ashley moved to California and earned her bachelor’s degree from California State University, Fullerton, before heading to Vanderbilt University where she graduated in 2014 with an MA in Latin American Studies.

Ashley currently holds two positions at UCLA, splitting time between the Lorinne Lydeen Library in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Hispanic American Periodicals Index (HAPI). At HAPI, she indexes journal articles for the benefit of students and researchers with an interest in Latin American topics. Additionally, she has led special projects, such as usability testing to validate the success of the new Web site launched in the summer of 2014. At Lydeen Library, Ashley focuses on the organization, evaluation, and assessment of the new library’s collection. Outside of work, she serves as vice-president of the UCLA Special Libraries Association (SLA) student chapter and as treasurer of the Information Studies Student Governing Board.

Prior to UCLA, she worked for Vanderbilt’s Center for Latin American Studies, performing a wide range of duties from event coordination to grant writing. In her second year, she worked under the direction of the Latin American and Iberian Bibliographer at the Jean and Alexander Heard Library, where she assisted with various collection development and research tasks. Outside of her assistantship, she served as the Project Coordinator for Conversations/Conversas, a collaborative project platform geared to facilitate artistic exchange and scholarly research between the Department of Art at Vanderbilt University and the School of Visual Art and Communications at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. In this capacity, she coordinated artist visits between Nashville and São Paulo, bridged communication between members, and served as the group’s documentarian.

Her research interests are divided between two area foci: Brazil and Guatemala. At Vanderbilt, she explored the convergence of Brazilian culinary culture and national identity in the early twentieth century, which culminated in “Serving a National Myth: Visions of Gastronomy in Gilberto Freyre’s Brazil”, a paper she presented at the 2014 Atlantic World Foodways conference at UNC-Greensboro. In this paper, she deconstructed the romanticized food ideology set forth by Brazilian sociologist Gilberto Freyre in his seminal work, Casa Grande e Senzala, and argued that Freyre encouraged Brazilian cultural nationalism through cuisine while criticizing the prevailing theory of white supremacy. In 2013, she spent two months abroad researching Brazilian culinary culture in Recife, Brazil at the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE).

A second interest cultivated during her graduate career involves the translation of K’iche’ Maya cultural heritage materials. At Vanderbilt, she completed a two-year program in K’iche’ Maya, which focused on the translation of colonial texts, such as the the Popol Wuj and the Rabinal Achi, and modern stories from the University of New Mexico’s K’iche’ Maya Oral History Project. In the summer of 2014, Ashley had the opportunity to spend six weeks in Guatemala to enhance her K’iche’ language skills and immerse herself in the culture by attending the Mayan Language Institute.

Upon graduation, Ashley hopes to combine her experiences and education in both Library and Information Science and Latin American Studies to pursue a career that strikes a balance between both disciplines, ultimately serving as a collection development specialist or subject liaison at a major research institution or special library.


Talia Guzman GonzalezTalía Guzmán González is a graduate student at the University of Maryland’s iSchool pursuing a Master’s in Library Science degree. She is an intern at the Smithsonian Latino Center working with the director of Public Programs and Exhibitions, researching partnership projects between the SLC and the DC Public Libraries. In 2014 she was a fellow of the Association of Research libraries Career Enhancement Program and participated in an internship at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, where she worked with Barbara Alvarez on collection development, instruction, reference services, and the creation of LibGuides on Brazilian Studies and Lusophone Africa.

Talía has a Ph.D. in Portuguese Language and Brazilian literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2010). Her dissertation is titled “Men at the Edge: Marginal(ized) Masculinities and Male Friendship in Late XIX and Early XX-Century Brazilian Novels”. She has published articles, translations and book reviews in the main journals in the field, as well as delivered conference presentations. Before pursuing the MLS degree, Talía was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Portuguese Language, Brazilian literature and culture, and Latin American Studies at the University of Maryland, where she taught undergraduate and graduate courses.

As a graduate student at the iSchool she has researched topics related to information and human rights in Brazil, international librarianship, and archival studies. After completing her degree, Talia plans to work as a subject specialist at an academic library or special collections library where she can combine library and archival work.

SALALM Fall 2014 Scholarship awardees


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Laura Geiken is a dual degree student at Indiana University, pursuing a Master’s in Library Science and a Master’s of Art in Latin American Studies. Additionally, she is an Associate Spanish Instructor at IU in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese. She has also worked as a Subject Specialist Assistant for the Latin American Studies Librarian at the Herman B Wells Library at IU. Before beginning graduate school, Laura served in the Peace Corps for three years on an indigenous reservation in Panama. In the Peace Corps, Laura worked on HIV/AIDS prevention projects and youth development.

During her time at IU, Laura has researched numerous topics related to the Americas. Much of her research has focused on Latin American migration patterns, questions of citizenship, and also the plight of undocumented students with regards to higher education in the United States. She has also explored issues of information access and outreach for minority populations in the U.S., particularly the Latin American diaspora. Furthermore, this past summer Laura investigated the public library system in Panama in relation to the closure of university library science programs.

In the future, Laura plans to work as a subject specialist with Latin American and Latino collections in a university setting. She also hopes to support first-generation college students through training and information literacy initiatives.


IMG_2960Taylor Leigh is currently completing a Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies at Brown University and a Masters in Library and Information Science at the University of Rhode Island.  Taylor wrote his MA thesis on authorial ideology in the Poema de Mio Cid and maintains an interest in medieval peninsular literary traditions. Currently, his dissertation work for the Ph.D. focuses on George Ticknor (1791-1871), first Smith Professor of Modern Languages at Harvard, founder of the Boston Public Library, and premier hispanist in the United States. The broad goal of the project is to highlight Ticknor’s importance to both hispanists and librarians working with Hispanic materials by detailing Ticknor’s crucial role in fostering the study of Hispanic culture in the United States and promoting the growth of libraries.

Taylor has had significant library work experience over the course of the last few years. In the summer of 2011, he was hired by the Department of Hispanic Studies to reorganize the department’s internal library. The following summer, Taylor worked as an archival assistant under Karen Eberhart, Manuscripts Processing Archivist, Brown University Special Collections, on the Jose Rodrigues Miguéis Collection, a diverse assortment of the late Portuguese-American writer’s manuscripts, correspondence, journals, photographs, and miscellanea.

During the summer of 2014, Taylor worked on collection development projects with Patricia Figueroa, Curator of Iberian and Latin American Collections at Brown University. He conducted a comprehensive review of the library’s holdings of texts included on the Department of Hispanic Studies’ Preliminary Examination List to ensure student and faculty access to serviceable editions. He also identified gaps in the library’s Hispanic Studies collection by working with faculty members and consulting literary histories, encyclopedias, and bibliographies.

In addition to Taylor’s academic and library experience, he has also worked as a translator, interpreter, and Spanish instructor. In 2014, he translated the Guantánamo Public Memory exhibit, “Bringing Guantánamo Home,” for the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage. He has five years experience as a Spanish language instructor at the college level, as well as two years’ experience teaching intermediate medical Spanish for the Alpert Medical School at Brown.

Taylor has lived, studied, and worked in Spain and Argentina, and has traveled extensively in those countries, as well as Chile and Uruguay. In the future, Taylor plans to look for subject specialist librarian or archivist positions that allow him to utilize his knowledge of the Hispanic world in conjunction with his library skills.

 

Meet the Spring 2014 SALALM Scholarship Winners!

Kathryn DarnallKathryn Darnall is a second year dual degree student at University of Texas at Austin, pursuing an MS in Information Studies at the School of Information and an MA in Latin American Studies at the Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, where she specializes in archives and human rights issues.  In addition to her studies, Kathryn is a Graduate Research Assistant at the Human Rights Documentation Initiative at the Benson Latin American Collection, where she works collaboratively with partner organizations in El Salvador, Rwanda, Burma, Guatemala and the United States to preserve human rights archival materials.  She is also an active participant in the newly formed Human Rights and Archives Working Group at UT Austin, a collaborative endeavor to provide resources to faculty interested in incorporating primary source materials into their courses.

This summer, Kathryn will be travelling to Guatemala as part of Librarians Without Borders to aid in cataloging and youth programming for community and school libraries in Chajul and Quetzaltenango.  In addition, she will be spending time in Guatemala City, conducting research at the Guatemalan National Police Archive on the topic of archival access policies.

After graduation, Kathryn hopes to use her varied work experience to assist non-profit and non-governmental organizations in their management of records documenting human rights abuses, in order to preserve these documents for future use.

 

Bulger, EmilyEmily Bulger will graduate in May 2014 from The University of Texas at Austin with a Master of Science in Information Studies and a portfolio in Museum Studies. Her graduate work brings together collections and database management with questions of access and visitor inclusion. She is especially excited about the growing attention paid to data sharing across institutions and the knowledge management and social justice potential of this trend.

Since January 2013, she has worked as a graduate research assistant at the Benson Latin American Collection, where she answers bilingual reference requests from people around the world, conducts research using the library’s holdings, and consults with the curator on exhibitions.

While in graduate school, she has worked as a curatorial intern at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum in Austin and as a web production intern at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in Washington, D.C. She also spent a semester teaching writing to engineers.

In addition to the SALALM Scholarship, she is the recipient of a Leadership Summit stipend from the Special Libraries Association Texas chapter, the Sam G. Whitten Endowed Presidential Scholarship from the School of Information, and the AAUW of Cascade County Scholarship. A native of Great Falls, Montana, she holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with high honors from The University of Montana, where she was a Presidential Leadership Scholar.

Prior to attending graduate school, Emily worked for the Spanish Ministry of Education teaching bilingual elementary school in Córdoba, Spain, an experience that cemented her love of the Spanish culture and language. The Andalucían accent is a habit she just can’t kick.

 

Meet the FALL 2013 SALALM Scholarship Winners!

Theresa E. PolkTheresa E. Polk is a second-year MLS student at the University of Maryland’s iSchool, specializing in archives. Alongside her studies, she is a student assistant to the Humanities and Social Science Librarians at Maryland, and serves on the executive board of ALA@UMD, the student chapter of the American Library Association at the iSchool. She has also completed internships at the National Anthropological Archive, the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress, and in the Repatriation Office of the National Museum of the American Indian. Theresa holds a BA in Latin American Studies from Carleton College, and an MPhil (Distinction) from Trinity College Dublin in International Peace Studies. Her Master’s thesis on gender based violence and impunity in post-conflict Guatemala received the school’s James Haire Memorial Prize for excellence in scholarship.

Prior to pursuing her MLS, Theresa worked in the public policy sector in Washington DC, analyzing the human rights and development implications of climate change, among other social justice issues. However, her interest in archives and access to information was awakened during her time as a human rights observer in Guatemala, supporting conflict-affected communities, families of the disappeared, and human rights defenders. This experience, as well as the 2005 discovery of Guatemala’s Archivo Histórico de la Policía Nacional, helped her to recognize the vital importance of public records for families who were seeking to discover what had happened to their loved ones, and to rebuild shattered lives in the wake of violence.

Ultimately, Theresa hopes to integrate her field experience in Guatemala and commitment to human rights with the technical skills provided by an MLS degree in order to contribute to the preservation of historic memory and construction of human-rights focused archives. She looks forward to collaborating with and learning from colleagues in SALALM as she takes her next steps forward in the profession.

 

 

Santana-NelsonNelson Santana is Assistant Librarian at the City University of New York Dominican Studies Institute (CUNY DSI) at City College, where he works closely with Chief Librarian Sarah Aponte in the administration of the Dominican Library. Alongside Chief Librarian Aponte, Nelson regularly teaches workshops on the history of the Dominican Republic, culture, and society, as well as the history of Dominican migration in the United States. He also provides research and reference consultation to library users; plans and conducts research in historical, social, and cultural themes related to the Dominican Republic and Dominican migration; and prepares bibliographies to serve as resource tools; among many other tasks. Nelson supervises and trains college assistants, work-study students, interns and volunteers, working in the Archives and Library.

At the moment, Nelson is pursuing a Master of Science in Library and Information Science with a concentration in Archival Studies at Drexel University. Nelson holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Baruch College and a Master in the Study of the Americas from the Center for Worker Education at the City College of New York’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Nelson’s research interests include the intellectual history of Dominican migration in the United States, the cultural and political history of the Dominican Republic, and the cultural production that looks at the link between social movements and music in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean.  In his MA thesis, “The Political Theology of Juan Paulino’s Club Cívico y Cultural Juan Pablo Duarte” (2012), Nelson argues how Roman Catholicism served as one of the principal driving forces that fueled the founding of one of the earliest Dominican organizations. He used the archival collection of Juan Antonio Paulino, which is housed at the Dominican Archives.

Nelson has presented his research at conferences including “Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders Conference 2013: ‘Reimagining the New World(s)”  at SUNY Binghamton, and “Commodities, Capitalism, and Culture: Latin America and Global Links” at SUNY Stony Brook.

Nelson is the recipient of several awards. At present time he is a Diversity Scholar (2013-2015) for the Association of Research Libraries (ARL).

Among his goals as an information professional, Nelson is interested in improving information literacy among users as well as working alongside his mentor, Chief Librarian Sarah Aponte to continue to disseminate knowledge pertinent to Dominican Studies. As an aspiring academic librarian, Nelson is interested in compiling and providing access to all bibliographical resources relating to Dominican Studies. As an aspiring archivist, Nelson expects to preserve the legacy and document the history of Dominican migrants in the United States.

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