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Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Lara Aase

Portrait of Lara Aase

Lara Aase will complete her MLIS at the University of Washington Information School in June 2016, with a focus on Ibero-American digital humanities, archives/special collections, and library materials and services for Spanish speakers. Her previous degrees include a BA in Music Performance and an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of New Mexico, and a PhD/ABD in Spanish Peninsular Golden Age Literature at the University of Toronto. In 2015 Lara was the recipient of the LIBROS Scholarship and an H.W. Wilson Scholarship. She is a member of AILA, ACRL, and ALA, and an active participant in SALALM’s Digital Scholarship in Latin America (DíScoLA) group and REFORMA’s Children in Crisis Task Force.

Currently, Lara also works with the San Diego Youth Symphony, where her participation involves teaching and research based on Venezuela’s Sistema to effect social change through music education. In the past, she has taught university-level Spanish, English as a Foreign Language, and Comparative Literature in Costa Rica, Canada, the US, and Tunisia (with the Peace Corps). Her library work has included Romance-language cataloging, rare books bibliography, academic library acquisitions, Spanish colonial manuscript transcription, scholarly journal editing and indexing, and public library programming and storytimes for Spanish-speaking families. In the future, she plans to serve marginalized communities by finding culturally appropriate ways to make humanities materials, particularly non-English and non-machine-readable materials, discoverable, accessible, and usable, both physically and online.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Daniel Arbino

Portrait of Daniel Arbino

Daniel Arbino is a graduate student at the University of Arizona’s iSchool pursuing a Master’s in Library and Information Science. He is a member of the Knowledge River, a program that specializes in diverse cultural practices within the field of Library and Information Sciences with a focus on Hispanic and Native American communities in the Southwest. Within that program he serves as a graduate assistant. He also volunteers at the Bartlett Library at the Museum of International Folk Art, where he has processed collections on New Mexican artists from the WPA era and New Mexican NEA National Heritage Fellowship recipients. This summer he will be participating in the Rare Book School fellowship program.

Daniel has a Ph.D. in Latin American Literatures and Cultures from the University of Minnesota (2013). His dissertation is titled Orphans of the Other America: Contesting Community in Twentieth-Century Caribbean Literatures. He has published articles, encyclopedia entries, and book reviews in the main journals in the field, such as Journal of Caribbean Literatures, Sargasso, PALARA, and Callaloo. His areas of focus include the African diaspora in the Caribbean and Latin America and representations and subversions of power in the regions. He also has experience as a college professor.

As a graduate student at the University of Arizona he has researched topics related to digitization initiatives in the Caribbean from a postcolonial perspective and digital preservation of Latin American photograph collections. After completing his degree, Daniel plans to work as a subject specialist at an academic library or special collections library where he can combine library and archival work.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Amanda Moreno

Portrait of Amanda Moreno

Amanda Moreno is an MA/MSLIS candidate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Library and Information Science at New York University and Long Island University. She will graduate from her coordinated master’s programs in May 2016, having received funding through NYU’s MacCraken Fellowship, the ALA Spectrum Scholars program, and the ARL Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce.

Graduating magna cum laude from the University of Miami in 2012 with degrees in Political Science, Psychology, and Spanish, she worked as an archives assistant at the university’s Cuban Heritage Collection, where she was first introduced to Latin American library and archival collections; this experience prompted her to pursue her graduate education in New York. She is currently a Collection Development Assistant for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU’s Bobst Library, where she helps grow the library’s Latin American collections and contributes to related reference and instruction efforts with the university’s undergraduate and graduate students. Her research and professional interests include Afro-Latin culture and community archives.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Hannivett Nabahe

Portrait of Hannivett Nabahe

Hannivett (Hanni) Nabahe is completing her Master’s of Library and Information Science with a concentration in Digital Information Management and a graduate certificate in Archival Studies at the University of Arizona. As a Knowledge River Scholar, she is committed to serving the information needs of Latino and Indigenous peoples, to fostering an understanding of information issues from the perspective of these communities, and to advocating for culturally sensitive information services in both libraries and archives.

Originally from Veracruz, Mexico, Hanni started her career eight years ago in the Pima County Public Library system, where she continues to serve as a library instructor. Since the start of her graduate studies, Hanni has had the chance to work at the University of Arizona Special Collections, first as a graduate assistant and, for the past year, as an ARL/SAA Mosaic Scholar. Her projects have included processing manuscript and born-digital Borderlands collections with extensive Spanish content, translating their first finding aids available in Spanish, and collaborating on a pilot project that hopes to create a sustainable way to provide bilingual access points by bringing together archivists and translators-in-training. A former copresident of the University of Arizona Chapter of the American Indian Library Association, she assisted the director of the Old Pascua Yaqui Museum and Cultural Center in developing a disaster plan and is currently working on a digital preservation plan for the museum’s audiovisual materials.

Last summer, Hanni worked at UC San Diego’s Special Collections and Archives as an ARL Career Enhancement Fellow and attended the Archival Education and Research Institute as an Emerging Archival Scholar. The summer before that, she attended the American Indian Language Development Institute, focusing on Tohono O’odham linguistics and learning to develop mobile apps for use in indigenous language revitalization. Hanni holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a focus on Multicultural Literature from Brigham Young University, where she also studied Portuguese for two years, immersed in the language while living in BYU’s renowned language houses.

After her graduation this May, Hanni will spend the summer preparing for the Academy of Certified Archivists examination, presenting at the National Diversity in Libraries and the Society of American Archivists conferences, as well as attending the IFLA World Library and Information Congress as a Congress Fellow. In the fall, Hanni will join the University of Arizona’s Eller School of Business to pursue a Master’s of Business Administration.

Meet the 2016 SALALM Conference Scholarship Winners: Emma Whittington

Portrait of Emma Whittington

Emma Whittington is a dual-degree master’s candidate at the University of Texas, where she studies at both the School of Information and the Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies. She is in her second semester of the program and plans to concentrate in Archival Studies. She also works as a Circulation Student Assistant at the Benson Latin American Collection.

Emma received her bachelor’s degree in Comparative Literature from the University of Virginia, where she completed an honor’s thesis about the publication history of Borges’s Ficciones. After graduating in 2012, she worked for the Rare Book School at UVa before spending a year living and working in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Her research interests include postcustodial archives, collection development, and the bibliotecas obreras of Argentina.

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