Monday October 20th 2014

Pages

Insider

Archives

Posts Tagged ‘Patricia Figueroa’

Spring 2012 Newsmakers

Sarah Aponte (CUNY Dominican Studies Institute Archives and Library) was honored at the 9th Dominican Women Writers’ Book Fair held March 23 – 25, 2012.

On February 15, 2012, Patricia Figueroa (Brown University) launched a new blog called Nuevas referencias: retratos de nuevos autores hispanohablantes. It is dedicated to drawing attention to newer Spanish-language authors.

Jana Krentz, formerly of the University of Kansas, has accepted the position of Curator of the Latin American collection at Yale University.

On February 20, 2012, Miguel Valladares, formerly of Dartmouth College, started working at University of Virginia at Charlottesville as the Romance Language Librarian. He may be reached at mav4n@virginia.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presidential Message August 2011

I would like to congratulate our colleagues for organizing an interesting, efficient and enjoyable conference in Philadelphia this past May. The theme “Preserving Memory: Documenting and Archiving Latin American Human Rights” was timely and of interest to us all. Many excellent presentations were held, thanks to the work of our past president Nerea Llamas. Many thanks as well to our excellent hosts, Joe Holub and David Murray of the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University libraries and our very generous sponsors.

Several important issues were expressed this year at the two Executive Board meetings, the Business meeting and at Town Hall. Executive Board Member-at-Large Sean Knowlton (Columbia University) presented a list of proposals compiled by Patricia Figueroa (Brown University) that represent concerns voiced by SALALM members in recent years:

  • that SALALM change its name to reflect the reality of the work we accomplish; i.e. a name that is more general in nature and by default more inclusive
  • that the SALALM conference be limited to 3 days instead of 5
  • that we eliminate panels and themes from our meeting so that we can devote more time to our committees, regional meetings and vendors
  • that we meet and celebrate SALALM in conjunction with LASA, mimicking the arrangement that MELA and MESA have for their yearly congresses. This arrangement would provide an outlet for SALALM members who must present a paper in order to receive funding to attend. The conference need not take place at the same hotel as LASA, but rather the same city and dates.

While some of these concerns have surfaced at various moments in our organization’s history, the present economic crisis has brought them to the fore once again. We are faced with a shrinking membership; our institutions provide less professional development funding than in the past; and conference costs are rising.

In order to address these proposals, I have named an ad-hoc Membership Survey Committee to collect information, opinions and ideas relating to the above issues. Members include Anne Barnhart (chair), David Block, Mary Jo Zeter, John Wright and Patricia Figueroa. Please respond thoughtfully to their survey which will be sent out in early fall.

A second committee will work concurrently with the Survey Committee to investigate the consequences, cost and feasibility of a name change for the organization. Ideas for new names or new meanings for our existing acronym will be explored. Should the membership agree on the desirability of a name change (via the survey process), the work of this committee will provide helpful information. The SALALM Name Change Committee includes Sócrates Silva, Melissa Gasparotto, Stephanie Miles and Sean Knowlton.

Treasurer Peter T. Johnson put forward a related proposal geared toward increasing membership in our organization. An initial SALALM scholarship of $1,000 will be awarded to a student enrolled in an MLS program (in the U.S.) who intends to work in the field of Latin American Studies, and who will join our organization.

In response to some of the concerns expressed above, I plan to experiment with the format of next year’s SALALM meeting. We will we return to a slightly more economical 4-day schedule; at the same time, I would like to create more time and space to work with each other and with our vendors, who are an integral part of our organization. I plan on repeating a version of the successful Libreros Workshop which was held in Philadelphia and organized by John Wright, Ellen Jaramillo and Stephanie Miles. Based on the feedback I heard, it provided a necessary forum for communicating information about the technological changes we face in our professions. Although I will continue to organize panels, workshops and committee meetings, there will be fewer of them. I encourage committees and affiliated groups who meet or work outside of our annual meeting to consider foregoing a meeting at SALALM if at all possible.

And last but not least, for those of you who have not yet heard, SALALM LVII will be held in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T!), from June 16-19, 2012. Our hosts will be the University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago and the Library Association of Trinidad and Tobago (LATT) and meetings will be held at the Hilton Trinidad & Conference Centre, Port of Spain. Our theme will be “Popular Culture: Arts and Social Change in Latin America.” I hope that we will be able to attract colleagues from across the Caribbean as well as from South America. A call for papers and will be released soon, and I look forward to receiving your ideas and contributions!

 

Lynn Shirey
Harvard University

Ibero American Cinema at Harvard

El cine como historia; la historia como cine: Simposio internacional sobre cine iberoamericanowas held at the Harvard University Film Archive from May 7-9, 2010.

Among the many presenters were Néstor García Canclini (UNAM), who wondered (as did other presenters) whether there is such a thing as Ibero American cinema in this age of co productions, television-sponsored films (HBO), and international financing. Juana Suárez (Univ. of Kentucky) and Gonzalo Aguilar (U. Buenos Aires) spoke about the international and multi-national nature of Ibero American film as well.

Historical memory and documentary film in Spain was a major topic, addressed by Ignacio Oliva Mompeán (Univ. de Castilla-La Mancha), Francisco A. Zurian (Univ. Carlos III) and Josetxo Cerdán (Univ. Rovira I Virgili). Oliva Mompeán discussed films made outside of Spain that address events of the Spanish Civil War: Muerte en el valle (Cristina Hardt) and Land and Freedom (Ken Loach) are two of them; to date few films addressing historical memory of the period have been made in Spain. He referenced the website “Imágenes contra el olvido” (http://www.imagenescontraelolvido.com/) which archives 13 such films.

 

From Cuba, Juan Antonio García Borrero (Camaguey) spoke about “ICAICentrismo” in Cuban film history, mentioning films produced by organizations and people outside of Cuban National Film Institute, and Luciano Castillo (San Antonio de los Baños) discussed the productions of Cuba Sono Film. Both García Borrero and Castillo have published extensively on film in Cuba.

Other notable speakers were Jorge Ruffinelli (Stanford Univ.), who discussed the work of Glauber Rocha while in Cuba; Román Gubern (Univ. de Barcelona), on anti-Semitism in Spanish postwar cinema, and Leonardo García Tsao (Cineteca Nacional de México) on Mexican cinema.

Laura Baigorri (Univ. de Barcelona) gave a presentation on video art in Latin America and discussed the project “Videoarde” (http://videoarde.com/). This presents a series of workshops, links, and publications; she hopes to develop a database of Latin American video art as part of the project.

The Colombian film director Víctor Gaviria presented three of his films: Vendedora de rosas, Medellín: sumas y restas and Rodrigo D no futuro and held discussions after each with Jorge Ruffinelli.

Jet setting librarians Patricia Figueroa (Brown Univ.), Jesús Alonso Regalado (SUNY Albany) and Lynn Shirey (Harvard) were in attendance and purchased copies of titles on Cuban film for their collections.

Lynn Shirey (Harvard University)

19th International Book Fair, Habana, Cuba, February 11-21, 2010


Getting the license and authorization letter to travel to Cuba through Brown University was a smooth process. The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Brown offers a study abroad program at Casa de las Americas in La Habana and a number of students and faculty members have already set the path for Cuban travel. I received Title VI funding for the trip and was advised to request my visa and plane ticket through Common Ground Education and Travel. My port of departure from the United States was Miami where I boarded a 50 minute charter flight to La Habana.

Prior to leaving for Cuba I had made arrangements to stay at a casa particular in El Vedado. This private bed and breakfast was run by Caridad Vera and her husband Elio Rodriguez Peréz. I was so happy with their services and friendship that I created a free Webpage through Yola for them: http://casavera.yolasite.com.

I arrived in La Habana on Monday February 15th in the afternoon. Changing my Euros to Cuban Convertible Pesos (CUC) at the José Martí International Airport was rather easy; however I failed to also acquire a few pesos in moneda nacional which travelers need for riding the municipal bus system and purchasing a few token items. It’s recommended that you do not change US dollars to CUCs. Not only is the US dollar worth less than the CUC but there is an additional 10% bank charge for the US currency.

The next day, I was able to visit the Feria International del Libro thanks to the kindness of a stranger. Not having any moneda nacional on me as I was boarding the special bus to the Fortaleza of San Carlos de la Cabaña, I had to ask the lady standing behind me for change. She quickly offered to pay for my bus ticket and for the entrance to the fair grounds. All I had to do is keep my mouth shut since foreigners have to pay a special price. I would have gladly paid the price for extranjeros but at the time following her advice seemed like the fastest way to get to my destination. Once we got through the doors my new companion paid to have our bags put away in a locker (you cannot enter the exhibits halls with handbags) and showed me around the various rooms where the publisher and bookdealer stands were located. Unfortunately, I soon realized that most books were sold in moneda nacional and I didn’t have the heart to ask my friend for change and, through her boundless generosity, have her pay for Brown’s burgeoning Cuban book collection. I just looked around with the intention of returning the following day.

I didn’t find any materials at the fair that I couldn’t purchase through my regular bookdealer. When you purchase books in Cuba you must keep in mind that you will need special permission to take out of the country books, journals and maps published before a certain date. The Biblioteca Nacional and the Instituto del Libro will assess the materials and process the paperwork for you.

On Wednesday I visited the Instituto Cubano de Arte e Industria Cinematográficos (ICAIC) with Martha Mantilla. I knew a few people from the ICAIC thanks to a Cuban panel and film series that was organized last year by the Providence Latin American Film Festival (PLAFF), an annual event co-sponsored by Brown University. Unfortunately we missed the Festival de jovenes realizadores cubanos that was due to start the following week.

That afternoon I walked along the Malecón to Casa de las Americas to visit its library and bookstore. The staff was friendly and very helpful. The gentleman managing the bookstore even created a list of Cuban films I should purchase for Brown’s collection.

On Thursday, I visited the Biblioteca Nacional and La Habana Vieja were one may find small bookshops and street book vendors. In the afternoon I strolled down to the famous Heladeria Coppelia where locals and tourists alike may purchase tasty ice cream for a few pesos. Given the limited sitting space and the large crowds people are forced to share tables, a civil way to make new friends in a foreign land. I sat with a young couple attending university. They spoke about the reality of the job market for young Cubans, salaries and the varying levels of job satisfaction. Having spoken about the world financial crisis they paid for my almond ice cream. I was rather mortified, especially since I now had many pesos in moneda nacional in my pocket, but they would not have it any other way. We later exchanged e-mails.

Friday was my last full day in Cuba and I decided to visit film director and theoretician Fernando Birri (Santa Fe, Argentina, 1925) at the Escuela de Cine y Televisión de Tres Mundos (EICTV) in San Antonio de los Baños, near La Habana. Don Fernando, who donated his personal archive to Brown University two years ago, co-founded the EICTV with Colombian novelist and Nobel Prize recipient Gabriel García Márquez in 1986. Since its foundation, Birri travels to Cuba every year and stays at the school for about a month to see its progress and talk to faculty members and students. The EICTV not only offers an impressive program in film and television but is self-sustainable through agriculture.

I left Cuba on Saturday afternoon. My book fair companion made sure to meet me at the airport to say goodbye. Not once did she accept repayment for all the pesos I owed her and only reluctantly accepted my gifts of Argentinean chocolates and Panamanian cookies.

Traveling to Cuba was a unique and culturally enriching experience.

Salalmistas/Lanistas in London

Patricia Figueroa (Brown University) visits colleagues Geoff West (left) and Aquiles Alencar-Brayner (right) at the British Library on January 12, 2010 (following a monumental snow fall throughout the UK).

Latest Topics

Head, Latin American and Caribbean Collection (LACC) Assistant University or Associate University Librarian

Head, Latin American and Caribbean Collection (LACC) Assistant University or Associate University Librarian The George [Read More]

Welcome, new members!

Welcome, new members!

Ana Ramirez Luhrs is a Research & Instruction Librarian at Lafayette College in Easton, PA. She is subject liaison [Read More]

Processing Archivist, Princeton University Library

Job Requisition: 1400686 Job Title: Processing Archivist Posting Site: Processing Archivist Processing Archivist Dean [Read More]