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First Presidential Message SALALM LX

Dear Colleagues:

As I write these lines, the memories of SALALM LIX are still fresh in my mind.  Past President Roberto C. Delgadillo and the Local Arrangements Committee, chaired by John B. Wright with support from the SALALM Secretariat led by Executive Director Hortensia Calvo, offered us a remarkable conference experience.  The variety of sessions in the academic program and other conference activities, including a live performance of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, provided ample opportunities for academic, cultural, and professional advancement.  The panels and conference sessions showcased the breadth and depth of both the individual and collective expertise in our organization.  Participation by new, mid-career, and veteran colleagues is a healthy sign of SALALM’s continued role as a vibrant forum for the discussion, exchange, and dissemination of library practices and scholarly issues related to the Latin American Studies field.  I particularly enjoyed the panel session “SALALM: Back in the Day.” Presented by David Block, Paula Covington, and Mark L. Grover, the session offered an enthralling account of SALALM’s achievements as an organization.  Over the years, SALALM members have spared no effort in building collections documenting historical and current Latin American affairs.  Paula and David shared vivid memories of traveling to Nicaragua in the early years of the Sandinista Revolution looking for materials to enhance library collections on this historical event.  Reflecting on SALALM’s decades-long history in the light of current developments in the library profession, Mark reminded us of the centrality of our expertise as Latin Americanists in the work we perform as research librarians.

SALALM will be observing the 60th anniversary of its foundation in 2015, making it a landmark year.  For the occasion, I have selected Brazil as the core theme of the SALALM LX conference program: “Brazil in the World, the World in Brazil: Research Trends and Library Resources.”  Hosted by Princeton University, the conference will take place on June 13-17, 2015.  The motivation for this theme is fully explained on the SALALM website.  But succinctly stated, I drew inspiration from thinking about the implications cooperation agreements between North American and Brazilian universities, research centers, and cultural heritage agencies may have on library collections and services.  These academic initiatives have been prompted by the growing recognition of Brazil’s rising global influence and its artistic, cultural, and intellectual effervescence.  Taking Brazil as the core theme, SALALM LX will explore the role of the research library within the current internationalization agenda of North American universities.  For the first time in nearly a quarter-century, Brazil will be showcased in a SALALM conference.  Brazil was last featured in 1990 during the 35th annual meeting of SALALM, held in Rio de Janeiro.  Planned by Ann Hartness, Librarian Emerita from the University of Texas, the theme of the conference was “Continuity and Change in Brazil and the Southern Cone.”

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez (Chair of Local Arrangements) and I have been working diligently throughout the year in the planning of SALALM LX.  I had the opportunity to visit Princeton on March 10-11, 2014.  During my site visit, I met with high-level library and university officials who enthusiastically supported Princeton’s invitation to host our conference in 2015.  Most prominently among these officials were University Librarian Karin A. Trainer and Professor Rubén Gallo, Director of the Program in Latin American Studies, who are the heads of the two units that will jointly host the conference.  Both directors are very pleased to see Princeton as the conference host and have given Fernando their full support in the organization of the event.  Some of you may recall that SALALM has met once before at Princeton.  This was back in 1985, when then-President Dan Hazen and Peter T. Johnson, serving as chairman of local arrangements, planned the 30th annual meeting of SALALM.  Much like in 1985, nearly all of LALALM LX’s conference events will take place on the university campus.  Fernando and I toured the campus to see various venues of possible interest for lodging, vendor exhibition space, as well as facilities for holding meetings, panel sessions, and other conference events.  I will report more on the conference venues in my next message.

Fernando crafted a packed agenda for my two-day visit, but as busy as we were, we still managed to squeeze into the itinerary a few events that were quite gratifying.  One such event was a presentation by renowned historian Serge Gruzinski on his recent work L’aigle et le dragon.  In a skillful exercise in comparative history, Gruzinski explores the radically different outcomes of the sixteenth-century European expansion into Mexico and China.  Whereas the Spanish achieved control of Mexico, the Portuguese failed in their attempt to conquer China.  The English language edition of this book is scheduled to come out under the title The Eagle and the Dragon later this year.  We also had the opportunity to share a close moment with Princeton University Professor Emeritus Arcadio Díaz Quiñones, the prominent scholar and former director of Latin American Studies.  Professor Díaz is one of the 27 Caribbean authors and intellectuals that are featured in Las Antillas letradas, a portfolio by graphic artist Antonio Martorell, recently acquired by the Graphic Arts Collection in the Firestone Library.  The portfolio consists of woodcut prints of the letters of the Spanish alphabet representing a selected author, or letrado, from the region.  For each letter, an image of the individual and excerpts of a representative work in the original language (English, French, and Spanish) is presented on the text.  This pictorially rich composition is juxtaposed on an image of a map of the Caribbean.  More information on this splendid work is available on the Graphic Arts Collection blog.

During my site visit, I had the pleasure of meeting in person Lilia Moritz Schwarcz, who will deliver the keynote address at SALALM LX.  Professor Schwarcz is a distinguished Brazilian anthropologist and historian at the University of São Paulo and a Princeton Global Scholar.  A prolific scholar, she has published extensively on the institutional history and the collections of the Brazilian National Library.  Her works include A longa viagem da biblioteca dos reis (2002), O livro dos livros da Real Biblioteca/ The Royal Library’s Book of Books (2003, bilingual edition), and most recently a chapter in Mestres da gravura: Coleção Fundação Biblioteca Nacional (2013), a book that features the unique collection of European prints and engravings in this impressive repository.

One of the oldest national libraries in Latin America and one of the largest national libraries in the world, Brazil’s Biblioteca Nacional has a peculiar history.  The provenance of the core holdings of the original library collection—over 60,000 volumes plus manuscripts, maps, and prints, and other rare materials—can be traced back to the personal library of King João VI of Portugal.  In 1808, the Portuguese crown, the government, and many members of the aristocracy resettled in Rio de Janeiro, fleeing from the Napoleonic invasion of the peninsula.  Rio became not only the new seat of the vast Portuguese empire, but also underwent important social and cultural transformations.  Besides introducing the Royal Press and the first newspapers, João VI ordered the transfer of his treasured library to Brazil.  The complete collection was shipped from Portugal in three stages from 1810 to 1811.  The installation of the library in Rio’s Carmelite monastery in 1810 is considered as the official foundation date of this institution.  The Real Biblioteca opened its doors to the public in 1814.  João VI returned to Portugal in 1821, but this time the royal library remained behind.  Control over the royal library became a key issue of contention during the negotiations leading up to Brazilian independence.  The newly independent country led by Emperor Pedro I, King João VI’s son, agreed to indemnify the Portuguese crown for the property and assets left behind in Brazil, including, remarkably, the formerly royal library collection.  As this story shows us, libraries and their collections represent more than knowledge—power.

Hosting SLALAM LX in the Northeast will hopefully attract participation by specialists and graduate students enrolled in library programs as well as in Latin American Studies programs in that region.  We will tap the support of our LANE colleagues to help us reach out to this potential pool of participants.  Please stay tuned!

As Hortensia recently reported, the state of SALALM’s financial health is good, which is always reassuring to hear.  So please renew your memberships on time.  This type of simple, straightforward action works wonders for maintaining our organization’s strength.

Finally, I started this message by referring to two of our veteran colleagues, David Block and Mark L. Grover.  David retired just last month.  Mark had retired a year earlier, but at the last SALALM conference, he was elected as Honorary Member of the organization by the Executive Board.  This distinction recognizes Mark’s multiple professional accomplishments and contributions to SALALM.  Thank you to you both, estimados colegas, for everything you contributed to SALALM during your long productive careers.

Luis A. González
President, SALALM (2014-2015)
Indiana University
luisgonz@indiana.edu

From Trash to Treasure: Introducing the libros cartoneros from Latin America and Spain, A Multimedia Exhibition


Since emerging in Argentina in 2003, libros cartoneros have flourished throughout Latin America and Spain.  Bound in recycled cardboard, these distinctive handmade books are published by small independent presses with noble aspirations: to promote writing and make literature more accessible to the people.

The exhibition features a selection of the nearly 500 cardboard books from 22 publishers collected by the Indiana University Libraries.  The Latin American Studies collection holds one of the strongest library collections of these unique artifacts in North America.  The physical exhibition is arranged into eight displays, covering topics as diverse as emerging writers, social issues, children’s literature, and rediscovered works of literature.  Posters provide more information about the small independent cartonera publishers, their origins, their publishing philosophy, the innovative activities they use to disseminate their works, and the growing international recognition they are attaining as a valuable social and cultural initiative.  A digital companion exhibition can be seen on the new visualization screen (IQ-Wall) adjacent to the main exhibition area.  Finally, a poster exhibition further complements the displays in the lobby of the Wells Library.

The co-curators of this exhibition are Denise Stuempfle, Cataloger of Latin American Studies, and myself, Luis A. González, Librarian for Latin American Studies at Indiana University.

Interested visitors will also have the opportunity to make their own libros cartoneros in a workshop led by Jim Canary, Head Conservator of the Lilly library.  The accompanying workshop will take place at the Indiana University Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts (Room 221) on Friday, October 26 from 1:00 to 5:00 pm. For more information about the workshop, please contact Denise Stuempfle at dstuempf@indiana.edu.

The exhibition “From Trash to Treasure” will be on display on the main floor of the East Tower of the Herman B Wells Library through November 9, 2012. Check us out in Facebook.

Luis A. González, Ph.D.
Indiana University

Welcome, new members!

Bruce Bachand received a B.A. in Anthropology and minor in Spanish from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 19 ago before setting out to become a Mesoamerican archaeologist. At UMass, he worked as a shelver, serials assistant, and overall book worm for three years in the library to defray college expenses. After graduating, he taught English in Japan for the JET Program and upon returning spent a year or so haunting the Tozzer Library while moonlighting as a clerk at the Harvard Coop bookstore. In subsequent years, he obtained anthropology degrees from Brigham Young University (MA) and the University of Arizona (PhD). He was a Fulbright Scholar in Chiapas, Mexico during the 2009-2010 academic year and is currently a Pre-Columbian reader at the Dumbarton Oaks Library in Washington, DC. Bruce’s scholarly activities have placed him in Mexico and Guatemala for periods totalling about five years. He’s looking for a stable career where his research skills and love of books will transfer, and would like to become a subject specialist librarian. Bruce is completing an MSLS at the University of Kentucky and will be an intern at the Library of Congress next spring. He’s also a new HAPI indexer, and look forward to collaborating with Orchid and the other SALALMistas.

Jill Baron

Jill Baron is an archivist for Latin American literary manuscript collections at Princeton University.  In this position, which she has held since September 2011, she has processed the personal and working papers of writers such as Mario Vargas Llosa, Lorenzo García Vega, Saúl Yurkievich, Alejandro Rossi, and the nineteenth-century letters of Gabriel Iturri (friend and character study for Marcel Proust).  She has a B.A. in French and Comparative Literature from Bryn Mawr College, and spent many years working as a chef, including a long sojourn in kitchens in Andalucía, before moving to New York to pursue an MFA in fiction and poetry at The New School.  She received her MLIS from Rutgers University in December 2011, where she gained invaluable mentoring from Melissa Gasparotto and other Rutgers librarians.  At Princeton she takes great pleasure in working with manuscript materials, participating in the vibrant Latin American studies community, and working for Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez, fellow SALALMista.

 

Daria Carson-Dussán | Photo by Evie Hemphil

 

Daria Carson-Dussán joined the WU Libraries staff this year as the new Romance Languages & Literatures / Latin American Studies Librarian.  Daria graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a B.A. in English Literature and a fine arts certificate in art history from UC’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.  In 2005, she received her M.L.S. from the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University.  She began her professional career as a reference librarian at Indiana State University and worked at Franklin College as a reference/instruction librarian.

 

Lisa Gardinier is the new Latin American & Iberian Studies Librarian at the University of Iowa.  She recently finished a M.A. in Latin American studies at the University of Arizona, including an internship at the CEPAL headquarters library in Santiago, Chile. She completed her M.L.S. at Indiana University, including an internship with Luis González.  Her first post-M.L.S. job was as the technical services & information literacy librarian at Cochise College in Douglas, AZ.  Most of her experiences and academic interests in Latin America are in Chile and the Southern Cone or the U.S.-Mexico border.  She is looking forward to participating in SALALM and being a part of a great professional community.

 

Sara Levinson joined the Resources Description and Management section at UNC Chapel Hill as an original cataloger in 2009, working mostly on Spanish and Portuguese language materials both in the main collection and, more recently, in the Rare Books Collection. Sara graduated from Middlebury College with a B.A. in Spanish and Anthropology. She received her M.L.S. from the Palmer School in 2000 and began her professional career at the New York Historical Society cataloging some of their massive backlog. She later cataloged at Touro College while working part-time cataloging serials in the special collections in the Tamiment Library at NYU.

Berlin Loa

 

Berlin Loa is a graduate of the Knowledge River Program at the University of Arizona School of Information Resources and Library Science.  Her professional background is in non-profit management, fundraising and program development.  Her undergraduate degree is in English Literature with a thematic minor in anthropology, folklore and Africana studies. Berlin is currently participating in an internship as a Museum/Archives Technician and looks forward to developing a career in collections that represent Latino, Native American or Africana cultures.

 

 

José Ignacio Padilla

 

José Ignacio Padilla received his B.A. in Latin American Literature at the Universidad de San Marcos in Lima. He then moved to Princeton, where he completed a Ph.D. in the Spanish Department. His research has always focused on Latin American Poetry and Visual Arts. Three years ago he moved to Spain and started working at Iberoamericana Vervuert where he collaborates in editorial projects, but mostly works as the manager of the bookstore.

 

 

 

 

Deb Raftus | Photo by John Pai

Deb Raftus is the Romance Languages & Literatures Librarian and Assistant Instruction Coordinator at the University of Washington Libraries in Seattle.  She serves as liaison to the divisions of French & Italian Studies, Spanish & Portuguese Studies, and the Center for European Studies.  Her interests include the role of libraries in digital humanities scholarship, 21st century reference services, mentoring, and learning communities.

 

 

Tad Suzuki has been an academic librarian at University of Victoria  (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada) for the last 17 years and was only recently appointed to Hispanic & Italian Studies. His academic backgrounds are anthropology/linguistics, theology, and biblical studies. A practicing artist specialized in highly realistic acrylic canvas, his other subject area for the library is Fine Arts. Tad has been teaching himself Spanish off and on for the last several years, and just recently spent two weeks in Quetzaltenango (Xela), Guatemala for language training. While there, he also spent a weekend with a Q’anjob’al Mayan family in Santa Eulalia in the north-western region of Huehuetenango.

Brazil and the Lusophone Diaspora: Film Series and Exhibit Events at Indiana University

Two major events showcasing Brazilian and Lusophone history and culture are taking place at Indiana University-Bloomington during the Spring 2012 semester.

The “Cinema Maldito” Film Series runs February 23-24 at the Indiana University Cinema.  The marginal, or underground, film movement was a vibrant example of the independent, auteur cinema that emerged in Brazil in the late 1960s. The series was programmed by Richard Peña, director of the New York Film Festival.  For programming, go to the Indiana University Cinema site: http://www.cinema.indiana.edu/?post_type=series&p=2125)

The “Portuguese-Speaking Diaspora” exhibition at the Lilly Library was curated by Professor Darlene Sadlier, Director of the Portuguese Program in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.  The current exhibition features rare and first editions of canonical works of Brazilian and Portuguese history and literature, the majority belonging to the Lilly’s Charles R. Boxer collection.  João de Barros’ Asia (1552), Padre António Vieira’s Sermam (1646), and the first edition of Garcia de Orta’s Colóquio (1563), which includes the first-ever published poem by Luís de Camões, are a few of the Lusophone treasures on display.  The exhibit covers work representing the broad boundaries of the Lusophone world from Brazil to Africa to East Asia.

In 1972, the Lilly Library published a catalog of Brasiliana to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the declaration of Brazilian independence.  The original catalog of this exhibition, Brazil from Discovery to Independence, was prepared by Professor Emeritus Heitor Martins, who served as Chair of Indiana University’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the time.  A digital version of this out-of-print publication, plus a supplement prepared by Professor Sadlier, is now available online at http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/etexts/brazil/index.php.

The ‘Portuguese-Speaking Diaspora’ exhibition runs through April 30, 2012.  For more information,  please visit http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/exhibits.shtml.

 

Luis A. González
Indiana University

Meet the 2011 SALALM Scholarship Winners!

Lisa Cruces, masters student in Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin

Lisa Cruces has been a scholar and professional specializing in Latin American materials for the last 7 years. Her specific interests include archival enterprise, special collections and non-textual materials relevant to the Latin American sphere. After completing dual B.A. degrees in History and Latin American Studies at Texas State University-San Marcos in 2009, Lisa began her Masters of Science in Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin, concentrating in archival studies and librarianship.

Before beginning her graduate studies, Lisa conducted work in public history, exhibits, and libraries, with the shared goal of increasing scholarship and access to Spanish-language materials. Past work includes cataloging sueltas at the Harry Ransom Center Research Library and assisting the UT-Library System
with digitization projects.

Along with her previous work involving Mexico and El Salvador, Lisa traveled and conducted independent research in 2010 and 2011 on archival enterprise, preservation, and librarianship in Panama. She presented her poster, “A Case Study of Archives in Central America: El Archivo Nacional de Panamá” at the 2011 Annual Meetings of the Society of Southwest Archivists and the Society of
American Archivists.

Her most recent activities at the University of Texas include archival work, digital exhibits, and translation with the Benson Latin American Collection and the Human Rights Documentation Initiative.

 

Timothy Thompson, dual-degree master’s student in library science (MLS) and Latin American and Caribbean studies (MA) at Indiana University.

Timothy Thompson is a dual-degree master’s student in library science and Latin American and Caribbean studies at Indiana University. In his application essay, Tim highlighted his keen interest in both digital libraries and Brazilian studies, two areas that have gone hand in hand with his professional development as a librarian: within his MLS degree, he is also pursuing a digital libraries specialization, and his first two years of study at Indiana University were funded by consecutive Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships in Portuguese.

He has worked closely with Luis A. González, Indiana University’s Librarian for Latin American, Iberian, Latino, and Chicano-Riqueño Studies, under whose supervision he completed an internship centered on digital collection development. Using open-source reference management software, he helped implement a complete redesign of González’s Researching Brazil, an online gateway that provides a searchable index of Brazilian scholarly journals.
In 2010, Tim received a Boren Fellowship to spend the following year in Brazil. During the first half of 2011, he continued his study of advanced Portuguese and took language courses at the University of Brasília, where he also completed a graduate-level course in Information Architecture. Concurrently, he enrolled in an independent readings course supervised by González and wrote a review essay of 12 recent books related to library and information science in Brazil.

In April, he was selected to receive the 2011 Rovelstad Scholarship in International Librarianship, awarded annually by the Council on Library and Information Resources to sponsor travel to the IFLA World Library and Information Congress, held this year in San Juan, Puerto Rico. There, he was able to network and share his research interests with information professionals from throughout Ibero-America and the Caribbean.

During the latter half of the year, he conducted fieldwork for his master’s capstone project, which he will conclude during the upcoming semester. His research focuses on the contribution that digital libraries can make as educational resources supporting human development. He is undertaking an analysis of 13 major digital library initiatives in Brazil and has carried out a series of semi-structured interviews with project managers.

“The goal of my research is to determine the extent to which human development has formed part of the rationale for creating digital libraries in Brazil,” says Thompson. “My research is guided by the conviction that the expansion of digital information services can play a role in bridging the gap between libraries and local communities throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.”

With Cavan McCarthy (Louisiana State University, retired), he is currently co-authoring a chapter on Brazil for the second of a two-volume IFLA publication titled Libraries in the Early 21st Century: An International Perspective, scheduled for publication in early 2012.

New Publications: Fall 2011

Luis A. González (Indiana University) contributed to Collecting Global Resources (SPEC Kit 324), a national survey of North American research libraries organized by the Area Studies Department of the Herman B. Wells Library at Indiana University and published by the Association of Research Libraries (Washington, DC, 2011). The executive summary from this SPEC Kit is available here (http://www.arl.org/news/pr/spec324-20september11.shtml).

 

Peter T. Johnson and  Rhonda Neugebauer (University of California, Riverside) each contributed a chapter to Riobó, Carlos, ed. Cuban Intersections of Literary and Urban Spaces. Albany: State University of New York, 2011. Johnson’s chapter is entitled “Reading and Researching: Challenges and Strategies for Cubans” and Neugebauer’s chapter is called “Impact of the Bookmobile to Cuba Project on Library Outreach Services in Granma Province, Cuba” and deals with the Bookmobile to Cuba Project.

 

Ana María Cobos (Saddleback College) and Phil MacLeod (Emory University) have co-authored a chapter in John Ayala and Salvador Güereña, eds. Pathways to Progress: Issues and Advances in Latino Librarianship. Libraries Unlimited, 2011. ISBN 978-1-59158-644-9

 

Holly Ackerman (Duke University) is a contributing editor and author of several essays in a two-volume set released by Scribner’s Sons titled Cuba, Culture, History­ by Alan West Durán.  A joint project between Cuban and U.S. scholars, it contains 300 essays – half by island scholars and half from U.S./Europe. It will be out as an ebook in January. Congratulations to Holly! — Hortensia Calvo, Tulane University

Congratulations to all!

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