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Princeton’s Latin American Ephemera Project among recipients of CLIR’s 2013 Hidden Collections Awards

Princeton University Library’s Latin American Ephemera Project has received one of CLIR’s 2013 Hidden Collections Awards.  The announcement with a complete list of recipients can be read here.

The award will allow the Princeton library to implement a 3-year project where item-level metadata will be efficiently created for a vast and hidden collection of ephemeral materials from Latin America which will start to be digitized in early 2014 thanks to the financial support offered by the Latin Americanist Research Resources Project (LARRP).  The digitally reformatted and cataloged ephemera will then be available freely and globally on the web through a discovery interface which will include faceted searching and browsing.

 

The University of Oregon releases book and documentary on human rights in Guatemala

From silence to memory book coverThe Latin American Studies Program is proud to announce the release of two products of our collaboration with Guatemala’s Archivo Histórico de la Policía Nacional (AHPN).

The report Del silencio a la memoria. Revelaciones del AHPN, originally published in Spanish in 2011, has been translated and published with a preface by Kate Doyle. The book will be freely distributed in digital format and will be available here.

The publication in Spanish of the report Del silencio a la memoria was unanimously praised as a step forward in both making the work and mission of the AHPN widely known and offering a synthesis of its potential to understand how systematic state repression worked. The story told in this report is an exemplary case of commitment with the past and the future of a society still recovering from the wounds of violence and social injustice. Making this report available in English will amplify the reach of this story and will allow for increased international attention to the amazing work the AHPN is doing. We are very proud to be able to offer this translation to students, scholars, human rights activists, and everyone else with an interest in the connections between history, memory, archives, human rights, and power.

Gabriela Martínez’s documentary Keep Your Eyes On Guatemala (RT 54 min.) tells the story of the AHPN intertwined with the complexities of past human rights abuses, the dramatic effects they had on specific individuals, and present-day efforts to preserve collective memories and bring justice and reconciliation to the country. The film will premiere on October 24 (6 pm, 221 Allen Hall) and will be made available to educators, students, human rights advocates, archivists, and the general public free of charge.

The funding for these two productions was generously provided by the University of Oregon Libraries, the Network Startup Resource Center, Phil and Jill Lighty, the School of Journalism and Communication, and the Americas in a Globalized World Initiative.

Latina Icon Donates Papers to UConn Archives

MagGomezbyGeorgeMalave

A decade after Puerto Rico became a United States “protectorate” in the 1950s, scores of islanders streamed into New York City. Among them were poets, writers, musicians, and artists who used poetry and prose to question and examine their newfound identity, culture, and history in what became known as the Nuyorican Literary Movement.

Magdalena Gómez, a figure in that nascent movement, who used her voice to decry the oppression she observed and encouraged the disenfranchised to work to realize their potential, has recently given her personal papers to the UConn Libraries’ Archives & Special Collections in the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center.

Read the full press release here.

 

 

A collection of Dominican Heritage will go on display at the Smithsonian

A collection of Dominican Heritage will go on display at the Smithsonian to celebrate the Hispanic Heritage Month. Now there’s a call for more memorabilia from the public, primarily in Washington Heights and West Harlem.

The archive was started in 1992 at City College and now the Smithsonian is planning an exhibition based on what Dr. Ramona Hernandez has gathered here.

Watch the news clip here.

Diario de Pernambuco Now Online, 1825 – 1863

The Latin American Collections in the Special & Area Studies Collections Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida are proud to announce the online launch of the Diario de Pernambuco, starting with the first issue on November 7, 1825 through March 1863.

The Diario de Pernambuco is acknowledged as the oldest newspaper in circulation in Latin America.  The issues from 1825-1923 offer insights into early Brazilian commerce, social affairs, politics, family life, slavery, and such. Published in the port of Recife, Brazil, the Diario contains numerous announcements of maritime movements, crop production, legal affairs, and cultural matters. The 19th century includes reporting on the rise of Brazilian nationalism as the Empire gave way to the earliest expressions of the Brazilian republic. The 1910s and 1920s are years of economic and artistic change, with surging exports of sugar and coffee pushing revenues and allowing for rapid expansions of infrastructure, popular expression, and national politics.

 See the Diario de Pernambuco in the UF Smathers Libraries’ South American Digital Collections here: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00011611

 The Diario de Pernambuco is held by very few libraries, and only on microfilm, making it difficult to conduct research and even to access this important publication. Recognizing this critical need, Richard Phillips, Head of the Latin American Collections at UF, proposed and was awarded funding to conduct the first phase of this project. The first phase of the digital project to digitize the Diario de Pernambuco is now complete with the first issue from November 7, 1825 through March 1863 now all openly online for worldwide access. The Latin American Collection has submitted a proposal for funding a second phase of this important project.

Funding for the digitization of Diario de Pernambuco provided by LAMP (formerly known as the Latin American Microform Project), which is coordinated by the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), Global Resources Network. Ongoing support for the open, full, and free online access and permanent digital preservation provided by the UF Smathers Libraries.

Note: The functionalities and features of the [UF Digital Collections or Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)] are supported using the UF-developed SobekCM software. SobekCM is released as open source software under the GNU GPL license and can be downloaded from the SobekCM Software Download Site: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/software.  To learn more about the technologies, please visit the SobekCM page: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm.]

Contacts:

Richard Phillips, Head of the Latin American Collections, ricphil@uflib.ufl.edu, 352-273-2746

Laurie Taylor, UF Digital Collections, Laurien@ufl.edu, 352-273-2902

Adán Benavides Retires from University of Texas

Adán Benavides

Adán Benavides retired from the University of Texas Libraries on December 22, 2012, ending a career that spanned parts of three decades.  His departure marks the end of an era; he was the last member of the Benson Collection’s professional staff directly influenced by Miss Benson, herself.

As Librarian for Special Programs, Adán was the embodiment of the often-used library requirement to “perform other tasks as assigned.”  He was a very successful grant writer, a skilled publicist and an underappreciated development officer.  He received two grants from the NEH, totaling nearly $500,000, that preserved Mexican newspapers on microfilm and through film sales, established the nucleus of a Benson preservation fund. The quality of Adán’s work was recognized by his peers and awarded by both his employer and professional organizations.

While he became a jack of many trades, Adán resisted the pressure to become a generalist.  His Hispanic heritage and historical training underlay an abiding interest and deep knowledge of early Texas and the Southwest, a body of expertise impossible to replace. Although never gainfully employed as a historian, Adán never lost a historian’s appreciation for the importance of bringing documentation to light.  His monumental The Bexar Archives (1717-1836): A Name Guide, published in 1989, remains an essential tool for researchers.  Adán also conceived the project which became Primeros libros, recognized as a model for presentation of rare materials in digital formats.

Adán joined SALALM immediately upon his appointment to the Benson Collection.  Vocal in the organization’s deliberations and active in its committees, he was elected to a term as Member-at-Large of SALALM’s Executive Board in 2009.

Adán left a number of marks on the profession: influencing colleagues, producing scholarship, serving SALALM.  He left the Benson Collection a stronger institution than he found it.  We think Nettie Lee would be pleased with Adán’s work, although we doubt that she would have told him so.

 

David Block and Margo Gutierrez
Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection
University of Texas, Austin

Trio of Exhibits at Tulane’s Newcomb Art Gallery this Spring

William Spratling, whose work is the main focus of the Taxco exhibit.

 

On January 17, 2013, Tulane’s Newcomb Art Gallery opened a new trio of exhibits that showcase Mexican art and artists.  An article about the upcoming show appears in Tulane’s New Wave.

Jewelry designs by William Spratling, Margot van Voorhies Carr, Sigfrido Pineda, Fredrick Davis, and Los Castillo were selected by New Orleans designer, Mignon Faget, from the Latin American Library’s Spratling-Taxco Collection to comprise one of the three exhibits.  The exhibits will be on view until March 3.  The Newcomb show will present an opportunity to see some interesting and beautiful works that one does not ordinarily see very often.  If you have a chance, please stop by the Newcomb Art Gallery  in New Orleans, Louisiana this spring.

Zotero Now Compatible with HAPI

HAPI is excited to announce that it is now compatible with the open source citation manager Zotero.

Zotero software is a research tool that allows for the storage, organization and analysis of citations using Firefox browsers or using Zotero Standalone connectors to Chrome and Safari browsers. These citations can be exported as formatted references for notes and bibliographies in all major styles (MLA, Chicago, etc.). The software can be used online and offline, and is compatible with Microsoft Word. Zotero was developed by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, funded by the United States Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Many thanks go to Sebastian Karcher (PhD, Northwestern University), who very generously created a Zotero translator for HAPI. This translator allows for metadata from HAPI to be exported directly into your Zotero library. In addition to the main bibliographic information from HAPI (title, author, journal, etc.) that export to Zotero, HAPI subject headings and additional descriptors appear as tags in the item record.

Also, we would like to thank Jesus Alonso-Regalado (University at Albany, SUNY) and Alison Hicks (University of Colorado, Boulder) for their efforts in bringing this project to fruition.

More information about Zotero, including how to download the software, visit the Zotero website or contact me via e-mail dschoorl@ucla.edu or by phone (310) 825-1057.

 

Daniel Schoorl
Associate Editor
HAPI

Vicente Leñero Papers, 1954-2011 at Princeton University Library

Vicente Leñero Papers, 1954-2011

I am glad to announce that the Manuscripts Division of the Princeton University Library has recently added the papers of Mexican playwright, journalist, novelist, screenwriter, and essayist Vicente Leñero (1933- ) to its extensive collection of archives of Latin American writers and intellectuals.

Leñero published his first collection of short stories, La polvareda, y otras cuentos in 1959, winning first prize in the Concurso Nacional del Cuento Universitario for the collection’s eponymous story. Four years later, in 1963, Leñero was awarded the Premio Biblioteca Breve for his novel, Los albañiles, which he later adapted for the stage.  In subsequent decades, Leñero has produced a critically acclaimed and expansive body of work, including novels, plays, screenplays, television scripts and essays.  Although he evolved independent of any specific literary circle, as co-founder of the magazine Proceso, Leñero’s place as a leading intellectual in Mexico is undisputed.  He is also considered one of Mexico’s most important playwrights of the twentieth century. In later years Leñero has written prodigiously for Mexican cinema, and his credits include La ley de Herodes (1999), El crímen del Padre Amaro (2003), Fuera del cielo (2006), and Desde dentro (2012).

The Vicente Leñero Papers represent Leñero’s work as a playwright, screenwriter, novelist, and essayist from the late 1950s to the present day. The majority of materials consist of typed and autograph manuscripts of novels, plays, screenplays, television scripts and essays. The notebooks provide access to the earlier stages of some of Leñero’s published or performed works, and feature poems, drawings, ephemera and personal notes as well.  In addition to the manuscripts there is a sizeable amount of correspondence from friends and professional associates, including letters from José Emilio Pacheco and Subcomandante Marcos of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), and printed material highlighting Leñero’s early days as a writer.

A detailed finding aid created by SALALM colleague Jill Baron is available at http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/C1424.

Feel free to contact me or the Manuscripts Division for additional information about this collection.

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez
Princeton University Library

Librarian Exchange at Duke University

This article, published by the Universidad de Concepción, discusses an upcoming exchange between the Duke Libraries and several university libraries in Chile. The exchange will bring five librarians from Chile to Duke in March and April 2012 and four librarians from Duke to Chile in May 2012. All of the Chilean universities are in the Maule region which was affected by the earthquake last year. The exchange was arranged by our University Librarian, Deborah Jakubs with a grant from the Carnegie Corporation. I hope to report on the exchange at the Section meeting of LASA in May. If you have questions or suggestions for our Chilean colleagues, let me know.

 

Holly Ackerman
Duke University

 

 

Latin American Posters Collection at Princeton

Please visit http://pudl.princeton.edu/collections/pudl0025 to search Princeton’s extensive and growing collection of Latin American posters. The posters included in this digital project were created by a wide variety of social activists, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, political parties, and other types of organizations across Latin America, in order to publicize their views, positions, agendas, policies, events, and services. Even though posters produced in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Venezuela are the most abundant among the more than two thousand currently available on the site, almost every country in the region is represented. In terms of topics, some of the best represented are human rights, elections, gender issues, indigenous issues, labor, ecology and environmental issues, development, public health, and education. The Latin American Posters Collection is a component of the larger collection of Latin American ephemera that Princeton University Library has developed since the 1970s. Feel free to contact me with any comments or questions about the collection.

 

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez
Princeton University

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