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Fall 2012 Newsmakers

Sarah Buck Kachaluba (Florida State University), Jessica Evans Brady, and Jessica Critten have a forthcoming article entitled “Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources” to be published in College & Research Libraries, November 2013 73 (6).

David S. Nolen (Mississippi State University) will also be publishing an article, entitled “Publication and Language Trends of References in Spanish and Latin American Literature,” in College & Research Libraries, November 2013 73 (6).

Congratulations to Tony Harvell (University of California, San Diego) for building the Latin American Political Campaign Ephemera Collection database, which includes 800 digitized pamphlets; posters; flyers; and political party and elections commission documents with full meta data. The items are mostly from national elections from the mid-1980’s through about 2009 and primarily from Mexico and Central America. The collection was built up by Karen Lindvall-Larson (University of California, San Diego) over a number of years, much of it coming through the efforts of Vientos Tropicales, some of it a gift from a UCSD alumnus who worked as a monitor in the 1984 Nicaraguan national elections.    We are no longer adding to the collection here (since 2011), but the originals are in Mandeville Special Collections Library here at UCSD.

Tony Harvell also created the Mexican Presidential Election Campaign 2012, an archive of twelve months of web information archived from seven Mexican political parties in advance of the presidential election held on July 1, 2012.   The focus is on political platforms and candidates being put forth by the following parties:  Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI), Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD), Partido del Trabajo (PT), Partido Verde Ecologista de México  (PVEM), Convergencia, and Nueva Alianza.  There is a six month embargo on the release of content.

UCSD is also archiving similar content for the Venezuelan Presidential Election held October 7, 2012.  The crawl of web content began in July 2012 and will capture the web sites of the Partido Socialista Unido de Venezuela (PSUV) of Hugo Chávez and the Movimiento Primero Justicia (PJ) party of Henrique Capriles as well as the national election return statistics.   Because of embargoes, no content will not be released until December 2012.  Once released it will appear on the California Digital Library’s Web Archiving Service Portal.

New guide to the Latin American ephemera collections at Princeton

Dear colleagues,

I recently finished putting together this guide and thought that it would be of interest to some of you: 

http://libguides.princeton.edu/laec

It lists by country and subject area all of the collections of Latin American ephemera that the Princeton University Library has developed since the late 1960s (approximately 350) and links to item level finding aids or catalog records that for the most part describe in considerable detail the contents of the collections.

Saludos,

Fernando

Latin American Posters Collection at Princeton

Please visit http://pudl.princeton.edu/collections/pudl0025 to search Princeton’s extensive and growing collection of Latin American posters. The posters included in this digital project were created by a wide variety of social activists, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, political parties, and other types of organizations across Latin America, in order to publicize their views, positions, agendas, policies, events, and services. Even though posters produced in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Venezuela are the most abundant among the more than two thousand currently available on the site, almost every country in the region is represented. In terms of topics, some of the best represented are human rights, elections, gender issues, indigenous issues, labor, ecology and environmental issues, development, public health, and education. The Latin American Posters Collection is a component of the larger collection of Latin American ephemera that Princeton University Library has developed since the 1970s. Feel free to contact me with any comments or questions about the collection.

 

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez
Princeton University

New Latin American Ephemera Finding Aids at Princeton

I am glad to announce that all of the finding aids to our most recent collections of Latin American ephemera are now up (they correspond to Supplement VI of the Princeton University Library’s Microfilm Collection). You will find below a list with the title of every collection linked to its corresponding finding aid.  Each finding aid includes a general description and an itemized inventory of the contents of the collection.  Please note that all of our finding aids can be cross searched using the search interface at http://diglib.princeton.edu/ead/advancedSearch.

You will also note that we included runs of a handful of stand-alone serial titles.  Finding aids are not available for those.

In case that it’s of interest, I am attaching a narrative description of the overall collection that I prepared a while ago.  All of the collections are available through interlibrary loan or for purchase.  Feel free to contact me with any comments or questions.

 

Latin America

 

Brazil

 

  • Brazilian Catholic Church pamphlets, III, 1935-1994  [This last one is an older collection which had not been previously distributed. A finding aid isn’t available, but Worldcat record is highly detailed.]

  • Jornal dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra, 1997-2008

 

Chile

  • El Punto Final, 1998-2008
  • El Siglo, 1997-2008

 

Colombia and Venezuela

 

 

Cuba

 

  • El Caimán Barbudo, 1988-2007
  • La Tribuna de La Habana, 1988-1989

 

Mexico and Central America

 

 

Peru

 

 

Uruguay

 

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez
Princeton University

Latin American Posters Collection at Princeton University Library

http://pudl.princeton.edu/collections/pudl0025

The posters included in this digital project were created by a wide variety of social activists, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, political parties, and other types of organizations across Latin America, in order to publicize their views, positions, agendas, policies, events, and services. Even though posters produced in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Venezuela are the most abundant among the more than two thousand currently available in the site, almost every country in the region is represented. In terms of topics, some of the best represented are human rights, elections, gender issues, indigenous issues, labor, ecology and environmental issues, development, public health, and education.

The Latin American Posters Collection is a component of the larger collection of Latin American ephemera that Princeton University Library has developed since the 1970s.

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