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Diario de Pernambuco Now Online, 1825 – 1863

The Latin American Collections in the Special & Area Studies Collections Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida are proud to announce the online launch of the Diario de Pernambuco, starting with the first issue on November 7, 1825 through March 1863.

The Diario de Pernambuco is acknowledged as the oldest newspaper in circulation in Latin America.  The issues from 1825-1923 offer insights into early Brazilian commerce, social affairs, politics, family life, slavery, and such. Published in the port of Recife, Brazil, the Diario contains numerous announcements of maritime movements, crop production, legal affairs, and cultural matters. The 19th century includes reporting on the rise of Brazilian nationalism as the Empire gave way to the earliest expressions of the Brazilian republic. The 1910s and 1920s are years of economic and artistic change, with surging exports of sugar and coffee pushing revenues and allowing for rapid expansions of infrastructure, popular expression, and national politics.

 See the Diario de Pernambuco in the UF Smathers Libraries’ South American Digital Collections here: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00011611

 The Diario de Pernambuco is held by very few libraries, and only on microfilm, making it difficult to conduct research and even to access this important publication. Recognizing this critical need, Richard Phillips, Head of the Latin American Collections at UF, proposed and was awarded funding to conduct the first phase of this project. The first phase of the digital project to digitize the Diario de Pernambuco is now complete with the first issue from November 7, 1825 through March 1863 now all openly online for worldwide access. The Latin American Collection has submitted a proposal for funding a second phase of this important project.

Funding for the digitization of Diario de Pernambuco provided by LAMP (formerly known as the Latin American Microform Project), which is coordinated by the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), Global Resources Network. Ongoing support for the open, full, and free online access and permanent digital preservation provided by the UF Smathers Libraries.

Note: The functionalities and features of the [UF Digital Collections or Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)] are supported using the UF-developed SobekCM software. SobekCM is released as open source software under the GNU GPL license and can be downloaded from the SobekCM Software Download Site: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/software.  To learn more about the technologies, please visit the SobekCM page: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm.]

Contacts:

Richard Phillips, Head of the Latin American Collections, ricphil@uflib.ufl.edu, 352-273-2746

Laurie Taylor, UF Digital Collections, Laurien@ufl.edu, 352-273-2902

Fall 2012 Newsmakers

Sarah Buck Kachaluba (Florida State University), Jessica Evans Brady, and Jessica Critten have a forthcoming article entitled “Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources” to be published in College & Research Libraries, November 2013 73 (6).

David S. Nolen (Mississippi State University) will also be publishing an article, entitled “Publication and Language Trends of References in Spanish and Latin American Literature,” in College & Research Libraries, November 2013 73 (6).

Congratulations to Tony Harvell (University of California, San Diego) for building the Latin American Political Campaign Ephemera Collection database, which includes 800 digitized pamphlets; posters; flyers; and political party and elections commission documents with full meta data. The items are mostly from national elections from the mid-1980’s through about 2009 and primarily from Mexico and Central America. The collection was built up by Karen Lindvall-Larson (University of California, San Diego) over a number of years, much of it coming through the efforts of Vientos Tropicales, some of it a gift from a UCSD alumnus who worked as a monitor in the 1984 Nicaraguan national elections.    We are no longer adding to the collection here (since 2011), but the originals are in Mandeville Special Collections Library here at UCSD.

Tony Harvell also created the Mexican Presidential Election Campaign 2012, an archive of twelve months of web information archived from seven Mexican political parties in advance of the presidential election held on July 1, 2012.   The focus is on political platforms and candidates being put forth by the following parties:  Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI), Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD), Partido del Trabajo (PT), Partido Verde Ecologista de México  (PVEM), Convergencia, and Nueva Alianza.  There is a six month embargo on the release of content.

UCSD is also archiving similar content for the Venezuelan Presidential Election held October 7, 2012.  The crawl of web content began in July 2012 and will capture the web sites of the Partido Socialista Unido de Venezuela (PSUV) of Hugo Chávez and the Movimiento Primero Justicia (PJ) party of Henrique Capriles as well as the national election return statistics.   Because of embargoes, no content will not be released until December 2012.  Once released it will appear on the California Digital Library’s Web Archiving Service Portal.

1st Conference on National Digital Libraries – Santiago de Chile 8th – 9th September



Aquiles Alencar Brayner (BL) and Lucia Shelton (OCLC) at the National Library of Chile

The digital library, as many people have suggested, is everywhere. New technologies allow us to gather a massive number of information in digital format and carry it with us in a myriad of technological devices such as laptops, pen drives, mobile phones and e-readers. Never in history have we had this easy access to information. The problem we all face is how to deal with this new digital situation: which sources to use for the retrieval of pertinent information? What to select and how to archive materials in electronic format for future generations? How to deal with issues of preservation in the digital world? As one might guess, the First Conference on National Digital Libraries held in Santiago (Chile) last week had more questions than answers. We all agreed that ours is an age of ‘infoxication’ and that national and academic libraries have to act quickly in order to find the antidote for the treatment of this new syndrome. Many of the presentations in the conference raised common issues faced by National libraries when dealing with electronic publications, including the lack of depository laws for digital-born material and the development of new tools and standards for managing electronic information. Participants had also the opportunity to learn about international digital initiatives such as the World Digital Library set up by the Library of Congress and other similar projects being developed in Latin America and Spain such as the Biblioteca Digital Pedro de Angelis, a digitisation project led by the national libraries of Argentina and Brazil; and the Biblioteca Digital Iberoamericana, a collaborative project between various Ibero-American national libraries. The message that came across in the conference was straight forward: by creating strategies for effective selection (especially by avoiding duplication of collections and coordinating digitisation programmes), sharing access to digital information and setting up best practices for preservation, libraries will be in a better position to take decisions and lead the discussion on digital information, providing efficient and innovative service for our users.

Archivo de Prensa — Biblioteca Digital de Autores Uruguayos


Archivo de Prensa — Biblioteca Digital de Autores Uruguayos

“El Seminario de análisis de la comunicación, de Ciencias de la comunicación, Universidad de la República se ha propuesto habilitar este Archivo de prensa con el fin de difundir textos e imágenes, entrevistas, testimonios, obras periodísticas y literarias del pasado uruguayo que, hasta ahora, no fueron de fácil acceso ni frecuente atención.”

Latin American Travelogues digital project — 135 new volumes added


The Latin American Travelogues digital collection draws on the expertise of Prof. James N. Green, Professor of Latin American history; Patricia Figueroa, Curator of Iberian and Latin American Collections; students; and the staff of the Center for Digital Scholarship at Brown University Library.

The goal of this project is to create a digital collection of Latin American travel accounts written in the 16th-19th centuries. The works selected are linked to critical essays produced by undergraduate students who are enrolled in Prof. Green’s courses on Latin American history. This site will serve as a free-access visual and research tool for students and scholars alike.

The main purpose of the project is to integrate Brown’s Latin American special collections into the classroom; to introduce students to their research value; to promote them as an undergraduate research tool; to make them freely accessible world-wide; and to preserve them for a future generation of scholars.

We welcome questions and comments about this project.

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