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Welcome, new members!

Bruce Bachand received a B.A. in Anthropology and minor in Spanish from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 19 ago before setting out to become a Mesoamerican archaeologist. At UMass, he worked as a shelver, serials assistant, and overall book worm for three years in the library to defray college expenses. After graduating, he taught English in Japan for the JET Program and upon returning spent a year or so haunting the Tozzer Library while moonlighting as a clerk at the Harvard Coop bookstore. In subsequent years, he obtained anthropology degrees from Brigham Young University (MA) and the University of Arizona (PhD). He was a Fulbright Scholar in Chiapas, Mexico during the 2009-2010 academic year and is currently a Pre-Columbian reader at the Dumbarton Oaks Library in Washington, DC. Bruce’s scholarly activities have placed him in Mexico and Guatemala for periods totalling about five years. He’s looking for a stable career where his research skills and love of books will transfer, and would like to become a subject specialist librarian. Bruce is completing an MSLS at the University of Kentucky and will be an intern at the Library of Congress next spring. He’s also a new HAPI indexer, and look forward to collaborating with Orchid and the other SALALMistas.

Jill Baron

Jill Baron is an archivist for Latin American literary manuscript collections at Princeton University.  In this position, which she has held since September 2011, she has processed the personal and working papers of writers such as Mario Vargas Llosa, Lorenzo García Vega, Saúl Yurkievich, Alejandro Rossi, and the nineteenth-century letters of Gabriel Iturri (friend and character study for Marcel Proust).  She has a B.A. in French and Comparative Literature from Bryn Mawr College, and spent many years working as a chef, including a long sojourn in kitchens in Andalucía, before moving to New York to pursue an MFA in fiction and poetry at The New School.  She received her MLIS from Rutgers University in December 2011, where she gained invaluable mentoring from Melissa Gasparotto and other Rutgers librarians.  At Princeton she takes great pleasure in working with manuscript materials, participating in the vibrant Latin American studies community, and working for Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez, fellow SALALMista.

 

Daria Carson-Dussán | Photo by Evie Hemphil

 

Daria Carson-Dussán joined the WU Libraries staff this year as the new Romance Languages & Literatures / Latin American Studies Librarian.  Daria graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a B.A. in English Literature and a fine arts certificate in art history from UC’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.  In 2005, she received her M.L.S. from the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University.  She began her professional career as a reference librarian at Indiana State University and worked at Franklin College as a reference/instruction librarian.

 

Lisa Gardinier is the new Latin American & Iberian Studies Librarian at the University of Iowa.  She recently finished a M.A. in Latin American studies at the University of Arizona, including an internship at the CEPAL headquarters library in Santiago, Chile. She completed her M.L.S. at Indiana University, including an internship with Luis González.  Her first post-M.L.S. job was as the technical services & information literacy librarian at Cochise College in Douglas, AZ.  Most of her experiences and academic interests in Latin America are in Chile and the Southern Cone or the U.S.-Mexico border.  She is looking forward to participating in SALALM and being a part of a great professional community.

 

Sara Levinson joined the Resources Description and Management section at UNC Chapel Hill as an original cataloger in 2009, working mostly on Spanish and Portuguese language materials both in the main collection and, more recently, in the Rare Books Collection. Sara graduated from Middlebury College with a B.A. in Spanish and Anthropology. She received her M.L.S. from the Palmer School in 2000 and began her professional career at the New York Historical Society cataloging some of their massive backlog. She later cataloged at Touro College while working part-time cataloging serials in the special collections in the Tamiment Library at NYU.

Berlin Loa

 

Berlin Loa is a graduate of the Knowledge River Program at the University of Arizona School of Information Resources and Library Science.  Her professional background is in non-profit management, fundraising and program development.  Her undergraduate degree is in English Literature with a thematic minor in anthropology, folklore and Africana studies. Berlin is currently participating in an internship as a Museum/Archives Technician and looks forward to developing a career in collections that represent Latino, Native American or Africana cultures.

 

 

José Ignacio Padilla

 

José Ignacio Padilla received his B.A. in Latin American Literature at the Universidad de San Marcos in Lima. He then moved to Princeton, where he completed a Ph.D. in the Spanish Department. His research has always focused on Latin American Poetry and Visual Arts. Three years ago he moved to Spain and started working at Iberoamericana Vervuert where he collaborates in editorial projects, but mostly works as the manager of the bookstore.

 

 

 

 

Deb Raftus | Photo by John Pai

Deb Raftus is the Romance Languages & Literatures Librarian and Assistant Instruction Coordinator at the University of Washington Libraries in Seattle.  She serves as liaison to the divisions of French & Italian Studies, Spanish & Portuguese Studies, and the Center for European Studies.  Her interests include the role of libraries in digital humanities scholarship, 21st century reference services, mentoring, and learning communities.

 

 

Tad Suzuki has been an academic librarian at University of Victoria  (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada) for the last 17 years and was only recently appointed to Hispanic & Italian Studies. His academic backgrounds are anthropology/linguistics, theology, and biblical studies. A practicing artist specialized in highly realistic acrylic canvas, his other subject area for the library is Fine Arts. Tad has been teaching himself Spanish off and on for the last several years, and just recently spent two weeks in Quetzaltenango (Xela), Guatemala for language training. While there, he also spent a weekend with a Q’anjob’al Mayan family in Santa Eulalia in the north-western region of Huehuetenango.

SALALMistas at ALA-New Orleans 2011

A dozen SALALM members attended ALA’s annual conference in New Orleans this past June. The group’s presence was felt at an ideally located booth, which had a definite local flair with beads and other colorful adornments. The stand was ready for visitors on Friday (6/24) and closed on Monday (6/27).

The day before (6/23) SALALM and other library groups/associations participated in the 2011 Spectrum Institute Professional Options Fair organized by ALA’s Diversity Office and sponsored by OCLC Inclusion Initiative. The event hosted more than 100 current MLS students from Library Schools all over the country. Hortensia Calvo and I talked to about 20 of these Spectrum Scholars who saw the words “Latin America” at our table.

Our collective presence at the exhibit hall made possible a visit to the aisle hosting several library schools. Hortensia and I met several of the representatives and gave them informational handouts about SALALM, ALZAR and ISIS. Some knew we existed, and for others we were a new group on their radar screen. SALALM members at institutions with MLIS program are encouraged to ensure not only that our informational materials are visible to students but to “insinuate” ourselves as Latin American Studies Librarianship ambassadors to any job fair events for information professionals.

The conference also provided opportunities to learn about new products. Hortensia, Sean Knwolton and I were at a presentation where Oxford Bibliographies Online showcased their upcoming Latin American Studies file. I asked about pricing models and noted that the traditional formula of all campus FTE was not applicable for a product that would have a much more reduced number of users. A few days earlier I had expressed that same concern to another vendor of Spanish language ebooks. This issue was also raised at an ebook panel at Philadelphia’s SALALM conference. Vendors appear to understand that a different pricing model is needed and it’s really up to us to come up with a well documented alternative.

Thanks to all those who volunteered: Myra Appel, Roberto Delgadillo, Tony Harvell, Deb Raftus, John Wright, Sean Knowlton, Denise Stuempfle, Cecilia Sercán, and Michael Scott. Very special thanks to Hortensia Calvo and Carol Avila from SALALM’s Executive Secretariat who covered much of the three days of the exhibit.

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