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Brazil and the Lusophone Diaspora: Film Series and Exhibit Events at Indiana University

Two major events showcasing Brazilian and Lusophone history and culture are taking place at Indiana University-Bloomington during the Spring 2012 semester.

The “Cinema Maldito” Film Series runs February 23-24 at the Indiana University Cinema.  The marginal, or underground, film movement was a vibrant example of the independent, auteur cinema that emerged in Brazil in the late 1960s. The series was programmed by Richard Peña, director of the New York Film Festival.  For programming, go to the Indiana University Cinema site: http://www.cinema.indiana.edu/?post_type=series&p=2125)

The “Portuguese-Speaking Diaspora” exhibition at the Lilly Library was curated by Professor Darlene Sadlier, Director of the Portuguese Program in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.  The current exhibition features rare and first editions of canonical works of Brazilian and Portuguese history and literature, the majority belonging to the Lilly’s Charles R. Boxer collection.  João de Barros’ Asia (1552), Padre António Vieira’s Sermam (1646), and the first edition of Garcia de Orta’s Colóquio (1563), which includes the first-ever published poem by Luís de Camões, are a few of the Lusophone treasures on display.  The exhibit covers work representing the broad boundaries of the Lusophone world from Brazil to Africa to East Asia.

In 1972, the Lilly Library published a catalog of Brasiliana to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the declaration of Brazilian independence.  The original catalog of this exhibition, Brazil from Discovery to Independence, was prepared by Professor Emeritus Heitor Martins, who served as Chair of Indiana University’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the time.  A digital version of this out-of-print publication, plus a supplement prepared by Professor Sadlier, is now available online at http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/etexts/brazil/index.php.

The ‘Portuguese-Speaking Diaspora’ exhibition runs through April 30, 2012.  For more information,  please visit http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/exhibits.shtml.

 

Luis A. González
Indiana University

Documents of 20th-Century Latin American and Latino Art

Recently, a large digital collection of Latin American and Latino artwork and related primary sources became freely accessible online. Documents of 20th-Century Latin American and Latino Art consists of 2,000 documents from Argentina, Mexico and the American Midwest and is set to expand. Read and listen to more about it here.

New guide to the Latin American ephemera collections at Princeton

Dear colleagues,

I recently finished putting together this guide and thought that it would be of interest to some of you: 

http://libguides.princeton.edu/laec

It lists by country and subject area all of the collections of Latin American ephemera that the Princeton University Library has developed since the late 1960s (approximately 350) and links to item level finding aids or catalog records that for the most part describe in considerable detail the contents of the collections.

Saludos,

Fernando

Latin American Posters Collection at Princeton University Library

http://pudl.princeton.edu/collections/pudl0025

The posters included in this digital project were created by a wide variety of social activists, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, political parties, and other types of organizations across Latin America, in order to publicize their views, positions, agendas, policies, events, and services. Even though posters produced in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Venezuela are the most abundant among the more than two thousand currently available in the site, almost every country in the region is represented. In terms of topics, some of the best represented are human rights, elections, gender issues, indigenous issues, labor, ecology and environmental issues, development, public health, and education.

The Latin American Posters Collection is a component of the larger collection of Latin American ephemera that Princeton University Library has developed since the 1970s.

Juan José Saer Manuscripts, 1958-2004 at Princeton University Library

The Manuscripts Division has recently added the manuscripts of Argentinean writer Juan José Saer to its premier collection of archives, manuscripts, and correspondence by Latin American writers and intellectuals.  The collection contains numerous notebooks, notes, and drafts of Saer’s novels, essays, short stories, poems, and interviews.  Several items in the collection are unpublished.  Also included are background materials for Saer’s posthumous novel, La Grande, and some photographs.  A detailed finding aid is already available.

Juan José Saer, the son of Syrian immigrants to Argentina, was born in Serodino, a town in the province of Santa Fé, on June 28, 1937.  He studied law and philosophy at the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fé, and taught film history and criticism at the same institution.  He moved to Paris in 1968, where he taught literature at the University of Rennes, and lived in that city until his death in 2005.  Although Saer spent most of his literary life outside Argentina, much of his fiction was set on the area of northern Argentina known as el Litoral.  Among his literary works are the novels Cicatrices (1968), El limonero real (1974), Nadie, nada, nunca (1980), El entenado (1983), La ocasión (1988), La pesquisa (1994), and the book of poems El arte de narrar (1977).  Saer is considered by some critics to be the most important Argentinean writer of the post-Borges generation.

Feel free to contact me or the Manuscripts Division for information additional information about this collection.

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez
Princeton University

 

Merle Greene Robertson Collection at Tulane

The Latin American Library is very pleased to announce a new collection guide and web site for the Merle Greene Robertson Collection, Latin American Library Manuscripts, Collection 133.  The guide was prepared by Christine Hernández and David Dressing with assistance from Victoria Lyall and Lori Dowell.

Spanning the period from the 1920s to 2010, the papers of this art historian, archaeologist, artist, teacher, and writer consists of material related to the study of the ancient Maya gathered and produced over a lifetime of activity in the field. The collection includes correspondence, publications, photographic material, rubbings and line drawings of Maya relief sculpture, art work, and information on exhibits and conferences.

To access the guide and other information on the collection and on Merle Greene Robertson, see http://lal.tulane.edu/collections/manuscripts/robertson_merle


Hortensia Calvo
Tulane University

 

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