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CSRC Library at UCLA Reopens

Lizette Guerra (CSRC) and tatiana de la tierra at library opening. Photo courtesy of Sócrates Silva.

The Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC) Library at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) celebrated its reopening on March 8, 2011. Thanks to support from The Ahmanson Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, The Major League Baseball Players Association, and individual donors, the library has been renovated with new shelving, computers, a vibrant new coat of paint, a new sound system for special events, and a new librarian’s office which is glass encased and makes a statement of accessibility to the user. According to Chon Noriega, director of the CSRC, the new layout and remodeling will help “bring the library in synch with its activities.”

The reopening program highlighted special collections and initiatives at the CSRC Library such as the Edward R. Roybal Papers, which reflect Roybal’s family history and his years of public service as a Los Angeles City Councilman and U.S. Congressman; the Strachwitz Frontera Collection, the largest repository of Mexican and Mexican-American vernacular recordings in existence; and the Latino Theatre Initiative/Center Theatre Group Papers, an initiative at the Center Theater Group’s Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles which sought to increase theatrical programming relevant to the Latina/o community. Donors and scholars spoke not only about the unique collections and their importance to the historical record, but the sense of community and collaboration that is part of the ethos at the library. The program also included a performance by Raúl Pacheco from the Los Angeles band Ozomatli who was joined by the audience in the singing of his song “Gay Vatos in Love.”

Sócrates Silva
University of California, Los Angeles

 

Donation to Amigos


Letter of thanks from Amigos president, Mr. Isaac Vivas Escobedo.

 

SALALM librarians donated more than 170 books to Mexico’s library network Amigos: Red de Instituciones Mexicanas para la Cooperación Bibliotecaria (http://ciria.udlap.mx/amigos/) as part of SALALMistas’ annual participation at Guadalajara’s 2010 Feria Internacional del Libro. The project was coordinated in cooperation with the Benjamin Franklin Library of the U.S. Embassy in Mexico. Micaela Chavez Villa, Director of the Colegio de México Library and Amigos member, coordinated the book distribution among Amigos member institutions.

Adán Griego
Stanford University

 

Juan José Saer Manuscripts, 1958-2004 at Princeton University Library

The Manuscripts Division has recently added the manuscripts of Argentinean writer Juan José Saer to its premier collection of archives, manuscripts, and correspondence by Latin American writers and intellectuals.  The collection contains numerous notebooks, notes, and drafts of Saer’s novels, essays, short stories, poems, and interviews.  Several items in the collection are unpublished.  Also included are background materials for Saer’s posthumous novel, La Grande, and some photographs.  A detailed finding aid is already available.

Juan José Saer, the son of Syrian immigrants to Argentina, was born in Serodino, a town in the province of Santa Fé, on June 28, 1937.  He studied law and philosophy at the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fé, and taught film history and criticism at the same institution.  He moved to Paris in 1968, where he taught literature at the University of Rennes, and lived in that city until his death in 2005.  Although Saer spent most of his literary life outside Argentina, much of his fiction was set on the area of northern Argentina known as el Litoral.  Among his literary works are the novels Cicatrices (1968), El limonero real (1974), Nadie, nada, nunca (1980), El entenado (1983), La ocasión (1988), La pesquisa (1994), and the book of poems El arte de narrar (1977).  Saer is considered by some critics to be the most important Argentinean writer of the post-Borges generation.

Feel free to contact me or the Manuscripts Division for information additional information about this collection.

Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez
Princeton University

 

Merle Greene Robertson Collection at Tulane

The Latin American Library is very pleased to announce a new collection guide and web site for the Merle Greene Robertson Collection, Latin American Library Manuscripts, Collection 133.  The guide was prepared by Christine Hernández and David Dressing with assistance from Victoria Lyall and Lori Dowell.

Spanning the period from the 1920s to 2010, the papers of this art historian, archaeologist, artist, teacher, and writer consists of material related to the study of the ancient Maya gathered and produced over a lifetime of activity in the field. The collection includes correspondence, publications, photographic material, rubbings and line drawings of Maya relief sculpture, art work, and information on exhibits and conferences.

To access the guide and other information on the collection and on Merle Greene Robertson, see http://lal.tulane.edu/collections/manuscripts/robertson_merle


Hortensia Calvo
Tulane University

 

University of Florida Celebrates 80 Years of Latin American Studies

Gainesville, FL – The University of Florida (UF) proudly celebrates 80 years of teaching, research and service in Latin American Studies. The anniversary will be marked by a series of public events from March 24-26, 2011. The events include the dedication of a historical marker on the Plaza of the Americas, an academic conference, a Latin American career symposium, several art and cultural exhibits, and a gala reception. Full details can be found online at: http://www.latam.ufl.edu/News/conference.stm.

At UF’s commencement ceremonies on June 2, 1930, President John J. Tigert announced the creation of the Institute for Inter-American Affairs (IIAA), the first research center in the United States to focus on Latin America. Interest in Latin America at UF was, and still is, a natural result of Florida’s geographical proximity to the Caribbean and South America, its Spanish heritage, and its large Spanish-speaking population.

The IIAA’s inaugural conference was held in 1931 as part of the celebratory events marking the university’s 25th year in Gainesville. UF’s Plaza of the Americas was dedicated at the closing ceremony by planting 21 live oaks on the university quadrangle, one for each of the republics of the Americas at the time. Over the subsequent decades the IIAA evolved into what is known today as the Center for Latin American Studies. In 1961, UF’s Latin American program was among the first in the country to be designated a National Resource Center by the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) under its new Title VI program. It has been funded through Title VI ever since.

UF faculty members have been a force behind the development of the field of Latin American Studies nationally. The Handbook of Latin American Studies, the premier bibliography on the region, was published by the University Press of Florida from 1949-1978. The inaugural meeting of the Seminar on the Acquisition of Library Materials (SALALM) was hosted by UF in 1954. Also, three UF faculty members have served as president of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), the largest professional association in the world for individuals studying Latin America.

The mission of the Center for Latin American Studies is to advance knowledge about Latin America and the Caribbean and its peoples throughout the hemisphere. With over 170 faculty from colleges across UF, the Center is one of the largest institutions internationally for interdisciplinary research, teaching and outreach on Latin America, Caribbean, and Latino Studies.

This press release was reprinted with permission.

Hannah Covert
University of Florida Libraries

 

The UWI Renames Library

 

(Left to right) Jennifer Joseph, University and Campus Librarian, Professor Clement Sankat, Campus Principal, and Dr. Alma Jordan. Photograph courtesy of Mark Bradshaw.

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES

ST. AUGUSTINE, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO, WEST INDIES

THE ALMA JORDAN LIBRARY

Telephone: (868) 645-3232 Ext. 2132  Fax: (868) 662-9238  e-mail: almajordanlibrary@sta.uwi.edu
PRESS RELEASE

THE UWI RENAMES LIBRARY
The Main Library at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine which has been the intellectual hub of the campus for many years, has been renamed The Alma Jordan Library in recognition of the exemplary service and pioneering work of its first Campus Librarian, Dr. Alma Jordan. A ceremony to mark the occasion was held on Monday February 28, 2011 on the quadrangle in front of the Library and was attended by Dr. Jordan herself, the Campus Principal and other senior administrative staff, many of her former colleagues, library staff, information professionals from the national community, her relatives and friends. This iconic building with its distinctive pyramid shape was actually conceptualized by Dr. Jordan and was opened in October 1969. Dr. Jordan served as the St. Augustine Campus Librarian from 1960 to 1989 and the University Librarian from 1982 to her retirement in 1989. She has written extensively on Caribbean librarianship, and was a foundation member of the Library Association of Trinidad and Tobago (LATT) as well as the Association of Caribbean University Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL). Dr. Jordan has served on boards and committees nationally, regionally and internationally and is the recipient of many medals and awards, including the Hummingbird Medal (Gold) in 1989.  In 2001 she was inducted into the Hall of Excellence of her alma mater, St Joseph’s Convent, Port of Spain.

Dr. Jordan can be justly proud that those who have followed have built upon her legacy, creating a state of the art academic library. Moving beyond its imposing physical structure, The Alma Jordan Library is now a knowledge portal, providing a gateway to a vast digital storehouse of the intellectual output and information assets of The University of the West Indies.

This press release was reprinted with permission.

Elmelinda Lara
The University of the West Indies

 

Victor F. Torres publica

Víctor F. Torres published the essay “Del escarnio a la celebración” in México se escribe con J. Una historia de la cultura gay (Planeta, 2010).

David Dressing, New Librarian at Notre Dame

I am delighted to announce that David Dressing has been appointed to the position of Latin American and Iberian Studies Librarian at the Hesburgh Libraries of Notre Dame. David is coming to us from the Latin American Library at Tulane. He brings with him considerable experience in curating exhibits, collection building, and collection management. He received a PhD in History from Tulane University, and has also worked at The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Library of Congress. David will begin work at Notre Dame on April 1st, and can be reached at 1201A Hesburgh Library, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556.

Aedín Ní Bhróithe Clements
Notre Dame

 

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