Monday October 5th 2015




‘News’ Archives

2016 Conference Theme Announced



“Nuestro norte es el sur”: Mapping Resistance and Resilience in Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian studies


May 9-13, 2016

University of Virginia

Charlottesville, Virginia


The Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian regions have long been witness to great acts of resistance and resilience: from colonial heritage to democratization of the regions, the historical record is replete with widespread protests of abuses inflicted by the state and non-state actors, yet their open veins have not bled out. Many of the issues at stake in the resiliency of the regions are particularly visible in the context of globalization: from overlapping matters of ethnic and national identities in the cultural or political sphere, to neocolonialism in the economic sphere and gross imbalances of political power in the social sphere. SALALM 61’s theme will focus on the many ways in which individuals, organizations, institutions are facing globalizing trends in social, political, environmental and academic realms. Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies have proven resilient as a multi- and inter-disciplinary field, resisting direct assaults on its integrity by adapting and innovating. At stake in the resiliency of this field of area studies are matters of hegemony in North-South power dynamics, the rise of global and interdisciplinary studies, as well as the impact of the digital age on scholarship. In this framework, and borrowing from Joaquín Torres García, the title of the conference “Nuestro norte es el sur” is an invitation to consider and question the privileged position of the Global North in the academic discourse of the area, especially as that discourse engages with other disciplines against the background of global studies.

An examination of these topics can be framed in more specific terms by our recent professional endeavors as Latin American Studies librarians. Discussion at the Future of Area Studies Librarianship Workshop held at Indiana University in October 2013 addressed the fact that the focus on globalization in higher education requires a deep and broad understanding of all cultures and societies, which translates in a greater demand for international resources. What is the impact on globalized campuses and how will this fact influence the support for area and international collections and services?

This five-day conference will include three days of panel presentations, preceded by two days of round tables alongside our traditional business meetings. The round tables will provide a forum to continue the dialog of the workshop aforementioned and the round table “The Impact of Campus Internationalization on the Research Library” at SALALM 60 (2015). Because we want this conversation to permeate into discussions outside the realm of librarianship, the conference organizers will invite other stakeholders, e.g., area studies program administrators, faculty, doctoral students, and publishers to participate in SALALM 61. Special attention will be given to the foreseeable consequences of these trends in scholarly research, teaching, and librarianship, along with the strategies that librarians may develop in collaboration with other participants in the field to meet these challenges.

Each round table will consist of five invited individuals, each one representing one of the aforementioned stakeholders. Each table will focus on a given topic established by a set of questions prepared by the conference organizers. The dialogue will also embrace audience participation.

We are seeking for proposals for panels or panel presentations. Panels will include scholarly presentations related to the conference theme and will also include papers on practical issues of librarianship and archival management related to the topic.

Topics of discussion for panels and individual presentations may include, all within the context of Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies:

  • Overlapping matters of ethnic, racial and/or national identities in the cultural sphere.
  • Neocolonialism in the economic sphere and the consequences for research libraries and archives.
  • Hegemony in North-South dynamics and their effect in the publishing and library worlds.
  • The influence of the digital age on scholarship in this area.
  • The evolution of Global and International Studies.
  • The resilience of Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies within the context of globalization, its changes and innovations.


Interested presenters and panel organizers should contact Paloma Celis Carbajal, SALALM President, with proposals. Please include your name, institution, contact information, proposed title and abstract. The deadline to submit paper proposals is January 30, 2016.

Paloma Celis Carbajal, MA, MLS

Ibero-American Studies Bibliographer

212A Memorial Library

University of Wisconsin-Madison

728 State Street

Madison, WI 53703

Email: paloma.celiscarbajal[at]


For queries on local arrangements and book exhibits, please contact Miguel Valladares Llata, Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee.

Miguel Valladares Llata, MLS

Romance Languages Librarian

Room 408A Alderman Library

University of Virginia

Charlottesville, VA 22904

Email: mav4n[at]

Call for Applications: Dan C. Hazen SALALM Fellowship

We are excited to announce a call for applications for the Dan C. Hazen SALALM Fellowship with a submission deadline of December 15, 2015. Eligible applicants must be full-dues paying SALALM members for at least four years at time of submission, as verified by the SALALM Secretariat, with a documented engagement with activities in the organization through active participation.

 The goal of this fellowship opportunity is to strengthen our junior, mid and senior status members through the award of partial financial support for either scholarly research or professional development. The Fellowship Review Committee will evaluate each submission and awards will be announced February 1, 2016.

We believe this new initiative in SALALM reflects accurately the spirit and vision that Dan brought to the profession during the four decades that he enriched, as well as enlivened, our discussions and proceedings. For more information regarding eligibility, criteria, and how to submit an application please visit:

Any questions about the application process can be directed to:; questions regarding membership to SALALM can be directed to:

- Dan C. Hazen SALALM Fellowship Task Force

(Angela Carreño, Fernando Acosta Rodríguez, Alison Hicks, Daniel Schoorl, Mary Jo Zeter, Peter T. Johnson , ex officio: Paloma Celis Carbajal, Hortensia Calvo, Daisy Domínguez, Jesús Alonso Regalado)

SALALM Membership/Committee Preference Forms 2015-16; Formularios renovación de membresía y comités 2015-2016

Dear all/Estimados/Prezados todos:

Membership renewal time is once again upon us.  As you may recall, at the Miami meeting in 2013 it was decided that members will have until October 31 to renew for this year (2015-2016) and keep their membership current.  After that date, a penalty of US$12 will be charged for late renewals.  As we did last year, the Secretariat will send out weekly reminders on LALA-L during this two-month period.

Thanks in advance to everyone for renewing as soon as possible.

Special notice:  Even if you have pre-paid your membership for three years, you must fill in and return the attached Committee Preference Form in order to be included as a committee member for 2015-2016.

Here is some additional information on the many ways you can renew your membership:

2.  Go to the SALALM webpage at to obtain the forms.  Print, fill them out, and send with payment to the address below.  You may mail these forms to the address provided, or you can fax them to the number provided.

Thank you,

 Hortensia Calvo

Executive Director/Directora Ejecutiva



 Les escribo para recordarles que el período para renovar su membresía para el año en curso 2015-16 ha empezado a partir del 1 de septiembre.

Les recuerdo que en la reunión de Miami en 2013 se tomó la decisión de poner una fecha límite de dos meses para recibir su renovación, o sea, hasta el 31 de octubre.  Después de esa fecha se cobrará una multa de US$12.

Al igual que el año pasado, desde el Secretariado les enviaremos recordatorios cada semana durante estos dos meses. 

De antemano, agradecemos a todos por renovar su membresía cuanto antes.

 Nota especial:  Si Ud. ha prepagado su membresía  por tres años es necesario diligenciar el formulario de Selección de Comité adjunto y devolverlo al Secretariado para ser incluido en las listas de comité del presente año.

 Esta es información adicional sobre las diferentes maneras en que puede renovar su membresía:

1.-En línea siguiendo las instrucciones en este link

2. Ir a la Página Web de SALALM en para obtener estos formularios. Imprimirlos, llenarlos y enviarlos con el pago correspondiente a la siguiente dirección. Puede enviar estos formularios a la dirección facilitada, o enviarlos por  fax al número proporcionado.

Summer 2015 Newsmakers!

Natalie Baur, University of Miami, has received a Fulbright-García Robles award to work on a digital preservation research project. Read full announcement here.

Rafael Tarragó, University of Minnesota, recently received the President’s Award for Outstanding Service, one of the most prestigious honors awarded by this institution.

Suzanne Schadl, University of New Mexico, is the 2015 Medina Award recipient. Schadl received the award for her paper “Cite Globally, Analyze Locally: Citation Analysis from a Local Latin American Studies Perspective

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan, recent article ”Publish, not Perish: Supporting Graduate Students as Aspiring Authors“, published in Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication 2(3) was named in the LIRT Top Twenty Instruction articles of 2014.

Melissa Gasparotto, Rutgers University, received the  Best Article in Practical Academic Librarianship Award for “Search Engine Optimization for the Research Librarian: A Case Study Using the Bibliography of U.S. Latina Lesbian History and Culture”, published in volume 4, issue 1 of Practical Academic Librarianship.

T-Kay Sangwand, an Archivist, Human Rights Documentation Initiative; Librarian for Brazilian Studies at the Benson Latin American Collection at the University of Texas, Austin is honored as one of the Library Journal’s Movers & Shakers 2015

Welcome, new members!

Christensen photoJessie Christensen is the Receiving Section Supervisor in Monographic Acquisitions at Brigham Young University. She manages receiving for all monographs, including firm orders and approvals, as well as some copy cataloging functions. Jessie earned a BA in Spanish Translation and English and an MA in Spanish Literature from BYU, and is a second-year MLIS student at San Jose State University.

Christopher Lutz is a student of Latin American History (B.A., Antioch College; M.A. and Ph.D. in LA History and Comparative Tropical History, U. of Wisconsin-Madison) and  co-founder of CIRMA (Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica) in Antigua, Guatemala in 1978. First a small library, it has expanded over the decades to include a specialized library and rare book collection, a large fototeca of photos from national and international sources, and an Archivo Histórico of newspapers, private archives and documentary collections, not in competition with public repositories, focusing more on the contemporary period than earlier ones. CIRMA’s focus is on scanning  out-of print and rare books, photographic and documentary collections to make them more accessible  to a wider national and international public.

#salalm60 cheat sheet: practical info, restaurants, attractions

Welcome to Princeton! This ready-reference guide will help you navigate the conference.

Practical information

Local transportation


  • There is a taxi stand on Nassau Street across from Nassau Hall (near Palmer Square), and also at Princeton Station (the “Dinky”), where taxis are available mostly during rush hour.
  • See the Princeton public transit website for more information.

Campus shuttle

  • The Central and 701 Carnegie shuttle lines run from Firestone Library through the heart of campus. May be convenient for attendees who are staying in the dorms.
  • Summer schedules are available online. You can follow the shuttle routes in real time using the TigerTracker app.

Maps and tours

SALALM 60 conference map

  • Google map of conference venues and local attractions.

Princeton Campus Tours

  • The student-run Orange Key guide service provides year-round, one-hour campus tours. Reservations are not required for individuals or groups of fewer than 10. Please check the schedule for the beginning location of tours during the summer.
  • See the campus tours website for more information.

WiFi Access

  • For wireless Internet access, connect to the puvistor network from your device.
  • For further details, see Princeton help desk website.

Library access

  • Conference participants will be able to enter Firestone and branch libraries by showing their conference name badge at the security desk.

Weather resources

Emergency information

Medical services

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Conference venues

Nassau Inn

  • Hotel accommodations for SALALM 60.

Scully Hall (link to Google Maps)

  • Dormitory accommodations for SALALM 60.

East Pyne Hall (link to Google Maps)

  • Primary venue for the conference. Registration will be in the East Pyne Lobby.

Chancellor Green Hall

  • The Libreros’ Exhibit will be held in the Chancellor Green Rotunda and “Upper Hyphen” (the corridor connecting Chancellor Green to East Pyne).

McCosh Hall

  • Monday at 9:00am: McCosh 50 is the site of the Opening Session.

McCormick Hall

  • Tuesday at 10:45am: McCormick 101 is the site of the keynote address. Tuesday at 3:00pm: Town Hall Meeting.

Prospect House

  • Monday at 7:00pm: Prospect House is the site of the Host Reception.

Whitman College

  • Tuesday at 6:00pm: Whitman College Class of 1963 Courtyard is the site of the Libreros’ Reception.

Chancellor Green Cafe

  • Located on the lower level rotunda of Chancellor Green, Chancellor Green Cafe serves coffee, tea, and snacks. On Saturday and Sunday, the cafe will be open from 8:30am to 2:30pm.

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Local stores

CVS Pharmacy

  • 172 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • (609) 683-1391

Labyrinth Books

  • Princeton’s independent bookstore.
  • 122 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Labyrinth Books site
  • (609) 497-1600

Mandalay Trading Co

  • If you’re looking for gifts or trinkets, Mandalay Trading Company is the place to go! Stock up here on fun odds and ends.
  • 26 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Mandalay Trading Co
  • (609) 921-9068


  • Open 24/7, the Wa, as it is affectionately called by students, is a place to grab quick snacks or food. Located by Princeton Station.
  • 152 Alexander Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • (609) 924-2845

Whole Earth Center

  • “Princeton’s Homegrown Natural Foods Grocery.”
  • 360 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • Whole Earth Center site
  • (609) 924-7429

Whole Foods Market

  • 3495 U.S. 1, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • (609) 799-2919

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$ dining

Frist Campus Center (link to Google Maps)

  • Frist Campus Center has a “food gallery” with a variety of fast-food options, as well as Café Vivian, a vegan-friendly restaurant offering organic, sustainable and local food in a relaxed, environmentally conscious atmosphere.
  • Frist Campus Center Dining

Hoagie Haven

  • One of the favorite sandwich haunts of Princeton students! An essential Princeton experience.
  • 242 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Hoagie Haven site
  • (609) 921-7723

Infini-T Tea Cafe & Spice Souk

  • A vegan cafe and tea shop, Infini-T prides itself on importing some of the most varied and iconic kinds of tea.
  • 4 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Infini-T Cafe site
  • (609) 454-3959

Mamoun’s Falafel

Jammin’ Crepes

  • A perfect spot for breakfast. Sit on Nassau Street and see the town come to life.
  • 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Jammin’ Crepes site
  • (609) 924-5387

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$$ dining

Despaña Restaurant & Tapas Cafe

  • Looking for Iberian food? Look no further! One of Princeton’s only tapas cafes with Spanish cuisine, this is a fun place to try new flavors.
  • 235 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • Despaña site
  • (609) 921-2992

Efes Mediterranean Grill

EPS Corner

  • One of the few quality authentic Chinese restaurants in Princeton. Order your own dish or try eating family style.
  • 238 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • (609) 921-2388

Masala Grill

  • Vegan friendly.
  • 19 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Masala Grill site
  • (609) 921-0500

Mehek Fine Indian Dining

  • One of the hidden gems of Princeton; located below street level on Nassau, Mehek boasts some of the finest Indian cuisine in the town.
  • 164 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Mehek site
  • (609) 279-9191

La Mezzaluna

  • A high quality Italian restaurant on Witherspoon; lovely for a dinner with colleagues or friends. BYOB.
  • 25 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Mezzaluna site
  • (609) 688-8515

Naked Pizza

  • If you’re looking to order in, try Naked Pizza. They have everything from standard to vegan options.
  • 180 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Naked Pizza site
  • (609) 924-4700

Mo C Mo C Japanese Cuisine

  • Stop in for a Japanese dinner with friends. Vibrant atmosphere.
  • 14 South Tulane Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Mo C Mo C site
  • (609) 688-8788

Soonja’s Cuisine

  • Korean cuisine. Closer to dorms.
  • 244 Alexander Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • (609) 924-9260

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$$$ dining

Agricola Community Eatery

  • Stocked with organically grown ingredients, the flavors of Agricola Community Eatery are fresh and unique.
  • 11 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Agricola site
  • (609) 921-2798

Mediterra Restaurant and Taverna

  • Upscale restaurant with a Mediterranean vibe; perfect for an evening out. The excellent food is complemented by the atmosphere. If you choose to sit outside, you’ll have a lovely set of lights overhead and a fountain nearby.
  • 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Mediterra site
  • (609) 252-9680


  • Upscale fusion cuisine.
  • 66 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Mistral site
  • (609) 688-8808

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Drinks, dessert, etc.

Alchemist & Barrister

  • A cozy pub tucked into the streets of Princeton, A&B allows you to sit outside or in, and is well-known for its Tiger Burger. $$ (price range: $11-30)
  • 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • A&B site
  • (609) 924-5555

The Bent Spoon

  • You may have to wait in line for their ice cream, but it’s worth it. Vegan friendly. $$ (price range: moderate)
  • 35 Palmer Square West, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Bent Spoon site
  • (609) 924-2368

Chez Alice Gourmet Cafe & Bakery

  • $$ (price range: moderate)
  • 5 Palmer Square West, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Chez Alice site
  • (609) 921-6760

House of Cupcakes

  • Winner of TV’s Cupcake Wars, stop by House of Cupcakes for a wide variety of flavors and scents to satisfy your sweet tooth. $$ (price range: moderate)
  • 32 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • House of Cupcakes site
  • (609) 924-0085

Small World Coffee

  • Princeton’s favorite local coffee shop. Cash only. $ (price range: inexpensive)
  • 14 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • Small World site
  • (609) 924-4377 ext. 2

Triumph Brewing Company

  • Restaurant, bar, microbrewery. $$ (price range: $11-30)
  • 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Triumph site
  • (609) 924-7855

Yankee Doodle Tap Room

  • Located at the Nassau Inn, the Yankee Doodle Tap Room is a convenient option for hotel guests. $$ (price range: $11-30)

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On-campus attractions

Princeton University Art Museum

  • Saturday and Sunday from 2:00pm to 3:00pm: The museum offers a free one-hour highlights tour of its collections.
  • McCormick Hall
  • Princeton Art Museum
  • (609) 258-3788

Princeton University Chapel

  • Sunday at 10:00am: Ecumenical worship service.
  • Chapel site

McCarter Theatre Center

  • McCarter hosts a multitude of events from professional touring companies to annual events to Princeton University performance groups. Saturday, June 13, at 7:00pm: A performance of Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro is scheduled (3.5 hours).
  • 91 University Place, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • McCarter site
  • (609) 258-2787

Nassau Hall

  • The first building to be constructed on Princeton University’s campus, Nassau Hall carries the history and import of the university. Located on the building’s exterior walls are class plaques to mark the departure of each graduating class.

Firestone Library

  • Princeton University’s main library. Conference participants will be allowed into Firestone and branch libraries by showing their conference name badge.

Prospect Gardens

  • These gardens, nestled in the heart of the university campus, are located outside Prospect House, the one-time home of President Woodrow Wilson.

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Off-campus attractions

Grounds for Sculpture

  • If you’re feeling adventurous (and have access to a car), the Grounds for Sculpture contains unique contemporary outdoor sculptures spread out over 42 acres.
  • 80 Sculptures Way, Hamilton Township, NJ 08619
  • Grounds for Sculpture site
  • (609) 586-0616

Princeton Cemetery

  • The final resting place for a President and  a Vice President of the United States, most of the Presidents of the College of New Jersey/Princeton University and the Princeton Theological Seminary. Scattered throughout the cemetery are the graves of soldiers beginning with the Revolutionary War, professors, politicians, musicians, scientists, business executives, writers, a Nobel Laureate, a winner of Pulitzer Prizes as well as those who have called the Princeton area home.
  • 29 Greenview Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08540
  • Princeton Cemetery site
  • (609) 924-1369

Princeton Garden Theatre

  • Nonprofit, arthouse cinema.
  • 160 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Garden Theatre site
  • (609) 279-1999

Princeton Public Library

  • According to Wikipedia, the most visited municipal public library in New Jersey, with over 860,000 annual visitors. Just around the corner from the Nassau Inn.
  • 65 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08542
  • Princeton Public Library site
  • (609) 924-9529

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SALALM LX in the News

Estimados SALALMistas,

Our colleague Adán Griego, Chair of the Membership Committee, has been busy publicizing the upcoming SALALM LX Conference in social media outlets.  See his most recent post in the Facebook group page.

In addition, the Local Arrangements Committee has been using conventional media to publicize the conference.  Please take note of the column ‘SALALM reaches a new milestone’ that appears in the new issue (May 2015) of College & Research Libraries News I think the full text is available on the journal website

The complete citation of the column appears below:

“SALALM reaches a new milestone,” College & Research Libraries News 76, no. 5 (May 2015): 241.

 Saludos cordiales,


Luis A. González
President, SALALM (2014-2015)
Indiana University
May 2015

SALALM LX Preliminary Program

The preliminary program for SALALM LX is now available here. Please see the conference website for more information:

Carlos Olave appointed to Head of the Hispanic Reading Room of the Library of Congress

Carlos Olave, Head of the South America Section of the Latin America, Western European Division (ALAWE) of the Library of Congress, was selected to head the Hispanic Reading Room.  The former head, Everette Larson, who retired on September 30, 2014, served in that position for twenty years and twenty years before that as Reference Librarian, Area Specialist for Spain, Catalonia and Andorra, and webmaster.

Carlos came to the Library in 1988 from Princeton University  to catalog French materials.  He is a native speaker of Spanish who is also fluent in Portuguese, French and Italian—all languages used in the Hispanic Division.  At the University of Pittsburgh he earned a BA in Spanish and Portuguese with a minor in Latin American Studies and a Masters in Library Science.  From New York University he earned an MA in Spanish and Portuguese Literature.    At the Library  he cataloged Latin American books and periodicals from 1989 to 2001.   Then until mid-2008 he was a Reference Librarian in the Hispanic Reading Room, where he also assisted Ieda Siqueira Wiarda, the Luso-Brazilian Specialist, who retired on January 2015.   Carlos taught cataloging in Brasilia in Portuguese at the invitation of the U.S. Department of State and also the Library of Congress Rio Office.  He also taught cataloging in Argentina.   He starts on May 18, 2015.

In addition to being the Head of the Reading Room, Carlos will also perform the duties of Luso-Brazilian Area Specialist.

Georgette Dorn
Hispanic Division
Library of Congress

Meet the Spring 2015 SALALM Scholarship Winners!


Alda MigoniAlda Migoni is in her second year of graduate school at University of California, Los Angeles where she was awarded a graduate opportunity fellowship her first year. Alda is currently an ARL Diveristy Scholar as part of their Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce. She is pursuing a master’s in Latin American Studies and will master’s of Library and Information Science.

As an undergraduate at the University of Redlands, Alda spent a semester abroad in Peru. In Cusco, Alda developed her passion for preservation of oral histories and research on Latin American community organizing. Her professional interests include cultural heritage preservation, digital humanities, and reference. Alda works as a reference assistant at UCLA’s Powell library, where she provides research assistance as well as instruction on access to patrons. Alda also works with UCLA’s Portuguese and Spanish Department building and assessing their collection for a new reading room. She is currently pursuing a concentration in archives.

Ashley_Larson_scholarshipAshley Larson is a first-year master’s degree student in UCLA’s Library and Information Science program. Originally from Nebraska, Ashley moved to California and earned her bachelor’s degree from California State University, Fullerton, before heading to Vanderbilt University where she graduated in 2014 with an MA in Latin American Studies.

Ashley currently holds two positions at UCLA, splitting time between the Lorinne Lydeen Library in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Hispanic American Periodicals Index (HAPI). At HAPI, she indexes journal articles for the benefit of students and researchers with an interest in Latin American topics. Additionally, she has led special projects, such as usability testing to validate the success of the new Web site launched in the summer of 2014. At Lydeen Library, Ashley focuses on the organization, evaluation, and assessment of the new library’s collection. Outside of work, she serves as vice-president of the UCLA Special Libraries Association (SLA) student chapter and as treasurer of the Information Studies Student Governing Board.

Prior to UCLA, she worked for Vanderbilt’s Center for Latin American Studies, performing a wide range of duties from event coordination to grant writing. In her second year, she worked under the direction of the Latin American and Iberian Bibliographer at the Jean and Alexander Heard Library, where she assisted with various collection development and research tasks. Outside of her assistantship, she served as the Project Coordinator for Conversations/Conversas, a collaborative project platform geared to facilitate artistic exchange and scholarly research between the Department of Art at Vanderbilt University and the School of Visual Art and Communications at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. In this capacity, she coordinated artist visits between Nashville and São Paulo, bridged communication between members, and served as the group’s documentarian.

Her research interests are divided between two area foci: Brazil and Guatemala. At Vanderbilt, she explored the convergence of Brazilian culinary culture and national identity in the early twentieth century, which culminated in “Serving a National Myth: Visions of Gastronomy in Gilberto Freyre’s Brazil”, a paper she presented at the 2014 Atlantic World Foodways conference at UNC-Greensboro. In this paper, she deconstructed the romanticized food ideology set forth by Brazilian sociologist Gilberto Freyre in his seminal work, Casa Grande e Senzala, and argued that Freyre encouraged Brazilian cultural nationalism through cuisine while criticizing the prevailing theory of white supremacy. In 2013, she spent two months abroad researching Brazilian culinary culture in Recife, Brazil at the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE).

A second interest cultivated during her graduate career involves the translation of K’iche’ Maya cultural heritage materials. At Vanderbilt, she completed a two-year program in K’iche’ Maya, which focused on the translation of colonial texts, such as the the Popol Wuj and the Rabinal Achi, and modern stories from the University of New Mexico’s K’iche’ Maya Oral History Project. In the summer of 2014, Ashley had the opportunity to spend six weeks in Guatemala to enhance her K’iche’ language skills and immerse herself in the culture by attending the Mayan Language Institute.

Upon graduation, Ashley hopes to combine her experiences and education in both Library and Information Science and Latin American Studies to pursue a career that strikes a balance between both disciplines, ultimately serving as a collection development specialist or subject liaison at a major research institution or special library.

Talia Guzman GonzalezTalía Guzmán González is a graduate student at the University of Maryland’s iSchool pursuing a Master’s in Library Science degree. She is an intern at the Smithsonian Latino Center working with the director of Public Programs and Exhibitions, researching partnership projects between the SLC and the DC Public Libraries. In 2014 she was a fellow of the Association of Research libraries Career Enhancement Program and participated in an internship at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, where she worked with Barbara Alvarez on collection development, instruction, reference services, and the creation of LibGuides on Brazilian Studies and Lusophone Africa.

Talía has a Ph.D. in Portuguese Language and Brazilian literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2010). Her dissertation is titled “Men at the Edge: Marginal(ized) Masculinities and Male Friendship in Late XIX and Early XX-Century Brazilian Novels”. She has published articles, translations and book reviews in the main journals in the field, as well as delivered conference presentations. Before pursuing the MLS degree, Talía was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Portuguese Language, Brazilian literature and culture, and Latin American Studies at the University of Maryland, where she taught undergraduate and graduate courses.

As a graduate student at the iSchool she has researched topics related to information and human rights in Brazil, international librarianship, and archival studies. After completing her degree, Talia plans to work as a subject specialist at an academic library or special collections library where she can combine library and archival work.

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Latest Topics

2016 Conference Theme Announced

SALALM 2016 CONFERENCE THEME   “Nuestro norte es el sur”: Mapping Resistance and Resilience in Latin American, [Read More]

ICYMI: September 21-27

Avoid late fees! Renew your SALALM membership before October 31.  Information available here Call for Applications: [Read More]