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SALALM LX in the News

Estimados SALALMistas,

Our colleague Adán Griego, Chair of the Membership Committee, has been busy publicizing the upcoming SALALM LX Conference in social media outlets.  See his most recent post in the Facebook group page.

In addition, the Local Arrangements Committee has been using conventional media to publicize the conference.  Please take note of the column ‘SALALM reaches a new milestone’ that appears in the new issue (May 2015) of College & Research Libraries News I think the full text is available on the journal website

The complete citation of the column appears below:

“SALALM reaches a new milestone,” College & Research Libraries News 76, no. 5 (May 2015): 241.

 Saludos cordiales,

Luis

Luis A. González
President, SALALM (2014-2015)
Indiana University
May 2015

SALALM LX Preliminary Program

The preliminary program for SALALM LX is now available here. Please see the conference website for more information: http://salalm.org/Conf/

Carlos Olave appointed to Head of the Hispanic Reading Room of the Library of Congress

Carlos Olave, Head of the South America Section of the Latin America, Western European Division (ALAWE) of the Library of Congress, was selected to head the Hispanic Reading Room.  The former head, Everette Larson, who retired on September 30, 2014, served in that position for twenty years and twenty years before that as Reference Librarian, Area Specialist for Spain, Catalonia and Andorra, and webmaster.

Carlos came to the Library in 1988 from Princeton University  to catalog French materials.  He is a native speaker of Spanish who is also fluent in Portuguese, French and Italian—all languages used in the Hispanic Division.  At the University of Pittsburgh he earned a BA in Spanish and Portuguese with a minor in Latin American Studies and a Masters in Library Science.  From New York University he earned an MA in Spanish and Portuguese Literature.    At the Library  he cataloged Latin American books and periodicals from 1989 to 2001.   Then until mid-2008 he was a Reference Librarian in the Hispanic Reading Room, where he also assisted Ieda Siqueira Wiarda, the Luso-Brazilian Specialist, who retired on January 2015.   Carlos taught cataloging in Brasilia in Portuguese at the invitation of the U.S. Department of State and also the Library of Congress Rio Office.  He also taught cataloging in Argentina.   He starts on May 18, 2015.

In addition to being the Head of the Reading Room, Carlos will also perform the duties of Luso-Brazilian Area Specialist.

Georgette Dorn
Chief
Hispanic Division
Library of Congress

Meet the Spring 2015 SALALM Scholarship Winners!

 

Alda MigoniAlda Migoni is in her second year of graduate school at University of California, Los Angeles where she was awarded a graduate opportunity fellowship her first year. Alda is currently an ARL Diveristy Scholar as part of their Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce. She is pursuing a master’s in Latin American Studies and will master’s of Library and Information Science.

As an undergraduate at the University of Redlands, Alda spent a semester abroad in Peru. In Cusco, Alda developed her passion for preservation of oral histories and research on Latin American community organizing. Her professional interests include cultural heritage preservation, digital humanities, and reference. Alda works as a reference assistant at UCLA’s Powell library, where she provides research assistance as well as instruction on access to patrons. Alda also works with UCLA’s Portuguese and Spanish Department building and assessing their collection for a new reading room. She is currently pursuing a concentration in archives.

Ashley_Larson_scholarshipAshley Larson is a first-year master’s degree student in UCLA’s Library and Information Science program. Originally from Nebraska, Ashley moved to California and earned her bachelor’s degree from California State University, Fullerton, before heading to Vanderbilt University where she graduated in 2014 with an MA in Latin American Studies.

Ashley currently holds two positions at UCLA, splitting time between the Lorinne Lydeen Library in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Hispanic American Periodicals Index (HAPI). At HAPI, she indexes journal articles for the benefit of students and researchers with an interest in Latin American topics. Additionally, she has led special projects, such as usability testing to validate the success of the new Web site launched in the summer of 2014. At Lydeen Library, Ashley focuses on the organization, evaluation, and assessment of the new library’s collection. Outside of work, she serves as vice-president of the UCLA Special Libraries Association (SLA) student chapter and as treasurer of the Information Studies Student Governing Board.

Prior to UCLA, she worked for Vanderbilt’s Center for Latin American Studies, performing a wide range of duties from event coordination to grant writing. In her second year, she worked under the direction of the Latin American and Iberian Bibliographer at the Jean and Alexander Heard Library, where she assisted with various collection development and research tasks. Outside of her assistantship, she served as the Project Coordinator for Conversations/Conversas, a collaborative project platform geared to facilitate artistic exchange and scholarly research between the Department of Art at Vanderbilt University and the School of Visual Art and Communications at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. In this capacity, she coordinated artist visits between Nashville and São Paulo, bridged communication between members, and served as the group’s documentarian.

Her research interests are divided between two area foci: Brazil and Guatemala. At Vanderbilt, she explored the convergence of Brazilian culinary culture and national identity in the early twentieth century, which culminated in “Serving a National Myth: Visions of Gastronomy in Gilberto Freyre’s Brazil”, a paper she presented at the 2014 Atlantic World Foodways conference at UNC-Greensboro. In this paper, she deconstructed the romanticized food ideology set forth by Brazilian sociologist Gilberto Freyre in his seminal work, Casa Grande e Senzala, and argued that Freyre encouraged Brazilian cultural nationalism through cuisine while criticizing the prevailing theory of white supremacy. In 2013, she spent two months abroad researching Brazilian culinary culture in Recife, Brazil at the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE).

A second interest cultivated during her graduate career involves the translation of K’iche’ Maya cultural heritage materials. At Vanderbilt, she completed a two-year program in K’iche’ Maya, which focused on the translation of colonial texts, such as the the Popol Wuj and the Rabinal Achi, and modern stories from the University of New Mexico’s K’iche’ Maya Oral History Project. In the summer of 2014, Ashley had the opportunity to spend six weeks in Guatemala to enhance her K’iche’ language skills and immerse herself in the culture by attending the Mayan Language Institute.

Upon graduation, Ashley hopes to combine her experiences and education in both Library and Information Science and Latin American Studies to pursue a career that strikes a balance between both disciplines, ultimately serving as a collection development specialist or subject liaison at a major research institution or special library.

Talia Guzman GonzalezTalía Guzmán González is a graduate student at the University of Maryland’s iSchool pursuing a Master’s in Library Science degree. She is an intern at the Smithsonian Latino Center working with the director of Public Programs and Exhibitions, researching partnership projects between the SLC and the DC Public Libraries. In 2014 she was a fellow of the Association of Research libraries Career Enhancement Program and participated in an internship at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, where she worked with Barbara Alvarez on collection development, instruction, reference services, and the creation of LibGuides on Brazilian Studies and Lusophone Africa.

Talía has a Ph.D. in Portuguese Language and Brazilian literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2010). Her dissertation is titled “Men at the Edge: Marginal(ized) Masculinities and Male Friendship in Late XIX and Early XX-Century Brazilian Novels”. She has published articles, translations and book reviews in the main journals in the field, as well as delivered conference presentations. Before pursuing the MLS degree, Talía was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Portuguese Language, Brazilian literature and culture, and Latin American Studies at the University of Maryland, where she taught undergraduate and graduate courses.

As a graduate student at the iSchool she has researched topics related to information and human rights in Brazil, international librarianship, and archival studies. After completing her degree, Talia plans to work as a subject specialist at an academic library or special collections library where she can combine library and archival work.

SALALM Election Bios

Click here to visit the SALALM Election Candidate Bios page. Restricted to current SALALM members – please log in to view.

New Open Access Resource: Digital Archive of Latin American and Caribbean Ephemera

The Digital Archive of Latin American and Caribbean Ephemera is a steadily growing repository containing a previously unavailable subset of Princeton’s Latin American Ephemera Collection as well as newly acquired materials being digitized and added on an ongoing basis.

PrincetonEphemera

The Digital Archive of Latin American and Caribbean Ephemera is the latest and most ambitious phase in Princeton’s long time commitment to building and providing access to its unparalleled Latin American Ephemera Collection.  Open online access to this previously inaccessible subset of the collection has been possible thanks to the generous support provided by the Latin Americanist Research Resources Project (LARRP) and to a three-year starting grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).  The goal of Princeton and its partners is to continue adding hundreds of new digitized ephemeral items per month in the coming years and turn this vast and exceptional collection from a practically inaccessible archive into a dynamic scholarly resource that will support present and future academic activities in interdisciplinary Latin American Studies and in the broader social sciences and the humanities.

 

Welcome, new members!

nicholas_copNicholas Cop is the Founder and President of Nicholas Cop Consulting, LLC which he established in 2005. The company, based in Florida, provides information and education consulting services to universities, publishers, and academic and research library networks at the national and regional levels, primarily in Latin America. It also provides translation services of scholarly and technical texts in Spanish and Portuguese into English.

Nicholas was the founding director of OCLC’s Sales and Marketing Division for Latin America and the Caribbean (1995-2005). In addition to the various assignments the company undertakes, Nicholas is the international consultant to the SciELO e-journal and eBook initiatives, and was a member of the first Redalyc Advisory Board.

A graduate in physics (B.Sc.) from McMaster University, Canada, with postgraduate studies undertaken at the University of Toronto, Canada, Nicholas is fluent in English, Spanish and Portuguese with a working knowledge of French and Slovenian.

Talía Guzmán-González is a second-year MLS student in the iSchool at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP). She holds a PhD in Brazilian Studies from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and an MA from Indiana University- Bloomington. Prior to pursuing the MLS, she taught Portuguese language, Luso-Brazilian literature, and Latin American Studies at UMCP. Talía wants to combine her studies in MLS with her teaching and research experience and pursue career in an academic library or cultural heritage institution. She is interested in area studies related to Latin America, international librarianship, and digital humanities.

Gilland crop (1)Julianne Gilland is Associate Director for Scholarly Resources at LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections and Special Collections Curator for the Benson Latin American Collection. Before joining the Benson in 2013, she served as Deputy Director of the Robbins Collection at the UC Berkeley School of Law. Julianne received her Ph.D. in history from Berkeley in 2002, where she specialized in early modern Spain and Spanish America.

 

 

Welcome, new members!

Jason KauffmanJason Kauffman is a PhD candidate in Latin American history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is currently completing his dissertation, a social and environmental history of the Pantanal wetlands of rural Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay. He enjoys digging through old documents in the archives and tracking down obscure books. He also has a growing interest in the digital and environmental humanities. Before moving to North Carolina he earned a M.A. in Latin American History from the University of New Mexico and a B.A. in History from Goshen College in Indiana.

 

 

Cate KellettCate Kellett is the Catalog and Government Documents Librarian at Yale Law School. She helps select Latin American and Iberian titles and performs original cataloging on most foreign language materials acquired by the law library. Cate received her JD/MLS from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, MA in Spanish Linguistics from SUNY Albany, and BA from Cornell University.

SALALM Fall 2014 Scholarship awardees

SALALM_Pic

Laura Geiken is a dual degree student at Indiana University, pursuing a Master’s in Library Science and a Master’s of Art in Latin American Studies. Additionally, she is an Associate Spanish Instructor at IU in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese. She has also worked as a Subject Specialist Assistant for the Latin American Studies Librarian at the Herman B Wells Library at IU. Before beginning graduate school, Laura served in the Peace Corps for three years on an indigenous reservation in Panama. In the Peace Corps, Laura worked on HIV/AIDS prevention projects and youth development.

During her time at IU, Laura has researched numerous topics related to the Americas. Much of her research has focused on Latin American migration patterns, questions of citizenship, and also the plight of undocumented students with regards to higher education in the United States. She has also explored issues of information access and outreach for minority populations in the U.S., particularly the Latin American diaspora. Furthermore, this past summer Laura investigated the public library system in Panama in relation to the closure of university library science programs.

In the future, Laura plans to work as a subject specialist with Latin American and Latino collections in a university setting. She also hopes to support first-generation college students through training and information literacy initiatives.

IMG_2960Taylor Leigh is currently completing a Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies at Brown University and a Masters in Library and Information Science at the University of Rhode Island.  Taylor wrote his MA thesis on authorial ideology in the Poema de Mio Cid and maintains an interest in medieval peninsular literary traditions. Currently, his dissertation work for the Ph.D. focuses on George Ticknor (1791-1871), first Smith Professor of Modern Languages at Harvard, founder of the Boston Public Library, and premier hispanist in the United States. The broad goal of the project is to highlight Ticknor’s importance to both hispanists and librarians working with Hispanic materials by detailing Ticknor’s crucial role in fostering the study of Hispanic culture in the United States and promoting the growth of libraries.

Taylor has had significant library work experience over the course of the last few years. In the summer of 2011, he was hired by the Department of Hispanic Studies to reorganize the department’s internal library. The following summer, Taylor worked as an archival assistant under Karen Eberhart, Manuscripts Processing Archivist, Brown University Special Collections, on the Jose Rodrigues Miguéis Collection, a diverse assortment of the late Portuguese-American writer’s manuscripts, correspondence, journals, photographs, and miscellanea.

During the summer of 2014, Taylor worked on collection development projects with Patricia Figueroa, Curator of Iberian and Latin American Collections at Brown University. He conducted a comprehensive review of the library’s holdings of texts included on the Department of Hispanic Studies’ Preliminary Examination List to ensure student and faculty access to serviceable editions. He also identified gaps in the library’s Hispanic Studies collection by working with faculty members and consulting literary histories, encyclopedias, and bibliographies.

In addition to Taylor’s academic and library experience, he has also worked as a translator, interpreter, and Spanish instructor. In 2014, he translated the Guantánamo Public Memory exhibit, “Bringing Guantánamo Home,” for the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage. He has five years experience as a Spanish language instructor at the college level, as well as two years’ experience teaching intermediate medical Spanish for the Alpert Medical School at Brown.

Taylor has lived, studied, and worked in Spain and Argentina, and has traveled extensively in those countries, as well as Chile and Uruguay. In the future, Taylor plans to look for subject specialist librarian or archivist positions that allow him to utilize his knowledge of the Hispanic world in conjunction with his library skills.

 

SALALMISTAS in the news

Antonio Sotomayor, a Assistant Professor and Librarian for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign just published a chapter on the relationship between sports and politics in Puerto Rico. ”The Cold War Games of a Colonial Latin American Nation: San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1966.” In Andrew Johns and Heather Dietcher, editors, Diplomatic Games: Sport, Statecraft, and International Relations since 1945. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2014, 217-249. The publication can be accessed on Google Books.

Former SALALM president and Librarian Emerita from the University of Texas, Ann Hartness recently published a reference book titled Brasil: obras de referência, 1999-2013. This annotated bibliography follows the previous publication of Brasil: obras de referência, 1965-1998 also published by Briquet de Lemos Livros. you can find more information about this title here.

Paloma Celis Carbajal, SALALM president elect, Jesus Alonso-Regalado, University at Albany and Alison Hicks, University of Colorado at Boulder, Ann Barnhart, University of West Georgia will present at the Asociación Mexicana de Bibliotecarios, A.C. (AMBAC) during the meeting that takes place at the Feria Internacional del Libro de Guadalajara, Mexico.

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