Currently viewing the tag: "Teresa Chapa"

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 8:30-10:00 a.m.

Moderator:  Paula Covington, Vanderbilt University

Rapporteur: John Wright, Brigham Young University

Presentations

  • Making Book Fairs Friendlier through Technology — Jesus Alonso-Regalado, State University of New York, Albany
  • Acquiring the Unique and Unusual in Latin America and the Caribbean – Teresa Chapa, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • A First Buying Trip: Searching for Treasure in Trinidad — Adrian Johnson, University of Texas, Austin
  • Beyond the Book Trade: Establishing Relationships with Institutions and Scholars — David Block, University of Texas, Austin

Convington began the session sharing some results of her informal survey of SALALM members and their practices of making book-buying trips:  50+% attend one book fair per year, 30% attend 1-4 trips per year, one person reported that s/he attended 11 book fairs in 2012.  Some reasons librarians took no trips were lack of funding and time constraints.  Benefits of making book-buying trips include creating familiarity with the book market in that country/place, developing relationships with vendors, etc.  Some respondents of the survey indicated that they obtain funding to make such trips from their respective libraries through endowments and centers for Latin American studies.  Book-buying trips are important ways to acquire older items (retrospective collection development) and to discover what’s new.  One respondent to Covington’s informal survey indicated that it is critical to be in Latin America as often as possible if you are to be a bibliographer for Latin American materials.

Alonso-Regalado discussed how technology has always preceded book buying.  In his presentation he discussed how technological friendliness at Latin American book fairs (he says, “Not so much.”)  He also shared how he uses technology at book fairs.  Only Bogotá and Buenos Aires are prepared for mobile technologies.  You don’t need an app.  But other books fairs have apps.  Using apps appears to be more trendy.  Cuba, Santo Domingo, Bienal in Brazil, Liber (Spain)—sometimes they use a different Facebook page for each year.  Others fairs keep a continuous dialog going.  The recommendation is to have one account and use twitter with #[year] for each fair.  Wireless is not very good.  Without it, you can’t access any of this.  It is like building a house by constructing the roof first.  It doesn’t make sense.  At Guadalajara book fair, some vendors have great wifi.  One can ask them to use their passwords or go outside the fair into the city where free wifi exists, in food court areas, etc.  E-books have special places.  Corner digital, one book fair is all e-books.  Most important app is from Germany.  You want an app that allows you to open spreadsheet, Docs to Go, connect this to DropBox, generate a list (html) for each country and connect to my library.  He carries a list of books wanted by students, and has exchange rates handy.  He notes the importance of keeping students and faculty involved in trips through Facebook pictures so they see the books before they are processed; and they can request rapid processing.  Alonso-Regalado establishes a strong emotional connection with faculty and highlights the books he feels are most important.  He shares on Facebook and sends spreadsheets via email.  “Las farias del libro” Cerlac, open access book 2012:  http://www.cerlalc.org/files/tabinterno/2f0015_Ferias_Digital.pdf

Chapa views book-buying trips as a way to get access to small press items and handmade books from collectives or individual artists.  It also is a good way to get titles with poor or no distribution, such as indigenous literature.  She notes that she collects unique and unusual things in order to document 21st-century Latin American popular, literary, social and political culture.  She is drawn to items aesthetically and she works to acquire materials that support curricular and research needs of students and faculty. Chapa notes some things to consider before collecting on book-buying trips:  How will you get the materials back to your institution?  Where will they be housed in your institution?  Will the curator/librarian accept the materials?  What are the added costs of acquiring these materials—preservation/conservation concerns, cataloging?  Who will fund this purchase?  Does the material fit into the curriculum?  What kind of publicity and outreach can be generated to promote use?  Chapa purchased a portable Mayan altar that needed quite an elaborate box.  Where to start?  Go to independent and specialized bookstores (like El conejo blanco in Mexico City).  Go to galleries and cafes, museums and cultural institutions, street fairs, in-country vendor assistance, specialized book art dealers, book artists and bookmaking collectives can be found via websites, Facebook pages, personal contacts.

Johnson discussed his first book-buying trip to Trinidad, sharing the upsides and downsides of the experience.   He noted that he got administrative support for the trip by tagging it onto a conference. Then he assessed the collection to identify gaps. The following are his upside and downsides:

Upside—I saw the Benson’s collection of Trinidadian music before the trip.  Downside—with 150 colleagues in the same place doing the same thing, I didn’t realize how picked over the resources would be.  Upside—Unique places.  I looked for unique places before and was prepared.  Downside—Some of these unique places were closed or didn’t have anything.  Upside—Some of these unique places came through.  I found back issues of the Carnival Magazine.  Downside—Carrying around a bag’s worth of materials all day and week.  Plan ahead to deal with the materials you buy.  Upside—Coffee shops with wireless were very beneficial.  Upside—Connections/friends who were always willing to help.  Downside—I could have bought many things from our libreros.  Upside—Having a camera to use while searching.  Downside—Didn’t take enough pictures to document work trip.  Upside—meeting new, fun, interesting and crazy people along the way.

Block indicated that we are fantastic travelers.  We should know where our faculty are going, what they are doing pre- and post-research.  We are lucky to have the great libreros in SALALM who do such great work for us.  Why should we travel?  1) Some materials are best in situ.   Feature films and musical performances are examples.  Others include cheat maps, street literature, publications from political parties, 2) Insinuating ourselves in cultural institutions and scholars, and 3) Navigating cultural patrimony.   He tries to evaluate the scholarly interest and object location.  David warned that when we return home we need to be careful when filling out the immigration reentry forms.  Be careful how you indicate what you are bringing in or out of a country.  Librarians may be facing documentary repatriation in the future.

QUESTIONS:

Peter Bushnell (University of Florida)—Do sound recordings at the University of Texas, Austin go into the Benson Institute or the Fine Arts Library?  Johnson has spoken with the Fine Arts Library.  Patrons will be able to go into the catalog to identify items, but then will be able to pick up their desired materials at either the Benson or the Fine Arts Library.

Adán Griego (Stanford University)—Teresa mentioned independent publications—connection between group PDF catalog is existent.  Excursions and interesting—went to see Cartonera, Billega & Felicidad.  Teresa—it was gone the next year.

Mark Grover (Brigham Young University)—Young colleagues have interest in our collections by country, but our collections are not connected by 2nd order of interest—we have to select areas/disciplines within the country.  For example, German immigration in Santa Catarina, Brazil, family histories, regional histories.  These types of materials are in large measure not available in the United States.

Elmelinda Lara (University of the West Indies)—I support Mark’s collection for Trinidad.  Get information on LPs, get music.  Social commentary is on the cover.  Christmas music/Param is important for Trinidad collection.  AV materials for humorous recordings.  Print materials.  Labor movements are another big place.  Personal contacts with them.  They may deliver them themselves.

Jennifer Osorio (University of California, Los Angeles)—What about when you get back?  Understaffed departments.o

Covington responded that you should work more with your Spanish/Portuguese catalogers to help set priorities.  Johnson told about featuring the cataloger on Facebook as part of the whole process.  Alonso-Regalado indicated that he buys some gifts or sweets for the Technical Services staff.  Covington added that she creates lists and gives comments to the cataloger.  Chapa said to engage the staff with the newly acquired items.  Let them watch the videos, etc.  Be good to acquisitions people.

Phil MacLeod (Emory University)—I recently brought back 100-200 books.  I got a sense from the folks in acquisitions about how best to process this.  Without them the library administration would stop this [my book-buying trips] process.  Covington responded that technical services staff are involved in SALALM, and they are involved at Vanderbilt.  Adán Griego indicated that giving context to what we are receiving helps technical services colleagues. Griego always expresses gratitude for what they do with the materials he brings home.  Johnson responded that he thinks it is important to help Library Administration realize that by going on the trips he is acquiring something unique versus another copy of Tom Sawyer.

Gayle Williams (Florida International University)—Over the last ten years, I have found that preparation is important.  I print out and put in a spiral bound notebook.  Collection development becomes the orphan of our position because we are so stretched in other directions.  By being prepared, we are able to “focus’ our efforts.  Serendipity is important as well.  You stumble into things.  Spread the net wide.  Our SALALM book dealers are a great resource when I am on the ground, but I think they may get the wrong idea.  Some may ask, “Why not let them do all the work.”  It is important for the bibliographer to be on the ground as well.  We need to make sure we educate the SALALM book dealers as well so that they understand that going on book buying trips is important for us librarians.

Wendy Griffin—California linguists who help to write and create alphabets are a good place to find indigenous things.  Get in touch with local librarians and archivists.  They know who the scholars are.  They are not buying or acquiring books, but they will know who the people are.

Teresa Chapa—At UNC—Chapel Hill we are allowed to have our faculty who are abroad buy materials that they want.  They are reimbursed by the library when they return.

Phil MacLeod (Emory University)—How do you help a 20th-century librarian get into the 21st century?  Alonso-Regalado responded that anyone can do this.  Technology has always been with us, it is just a different form of technology that we are using now.

Adán Griego (Standford Univeristy)—I walk around with a cuaderno. Jesús Alonso-Regalado (SUNY-Albany)—Another tip—do small cooperative decisions on the fly.  Look for hot items, share information with colleagues.  That we can have 2 or 3 copies of an item in different regions of the United States.

Margarita Vannini (Instituto de la Historia de Nicaragua)—Patrimonio Cultural—I have an opposite perception.  Our countries are well preserved in the libraries of the United States  and Germany.  Perhaps you could return things to us that only exist in your libraries.  We can cooperate and share.  We recognize that many things are spread around the world.  Can we collaborate to digitize things that will help us to complete our history?

Debra McKern (Library of Congress)-What are you doing with your images of tagging [street art, graffiti]?  Block responded that LC is doing things and Princeton is doing things.  He will follow their lead.  There has been a proposal made at LARRP.  LC has BPG and DLOC already doing that.  Covington encouraged all who travel to put written reports of our trip up on the SALALM website.

 

Sunday, May 19, 2:30-4:00

Moderator:  Teresa Chapa, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Rapporteur:  Gabriella Reznowski, Washington State University

Presentations:

  • The Inter-institutional Consortium for Indigenous Knowledge (ICIK) at Penn State — Audrey N. Maretzki, Pennsylvania State University
  • Indigenous Knowledge in Academic Libraries: Collaborations in Outreach and Preservation — Helen M. Sheehy, Pennsylvania State University

Dr. Audrey Maretzki (Penn State) presented on the conceptual development of ICIK at Penn State. This global indigenous knowledge resource center was developed during the period between 1995 and 2003 and similar to others elsewhere such as the Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Rural Development (CIKARD) established at Iowa State by Dr. Michael Warren.  Warren’s goal was to work with indigenous communities around the world to develop a network of indigenous knowledge resource centers; and in 1995, he became an honorary chief in an Igbo village in Africa and was invited to Penn State. On that occasion he conducted a ceremony to mark the inception of Penn State’s efforts to develop a center for indigenous knowledge.

ICIK was designed to create a space where faculty, students, and local community interest in “knowledges” generated outside the academy could be shared in order to balance the concept of “outreach” with the concept of “inreach.” The idea was to engage with respectful research in collaboration “with” communities rather than research “about” communities or “in” communities.

Many colleges collaborated with ICIK, including the College of Medicine’s Kienle Center for Humanistic Medicine; the American Indian Leadership Program at Penn State, the College of Education, the College of Agricultural Science, Liberal Arts, the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship Program, and Penn State’s Global Development Center. Groups outside the university include the Centre County United Nations Association and the Center for Amazon Community Ecology.

ICIK’s endeavors include a listserv, L-ICIK, which currently reaches 800 subscribers around the world;  a course that is open to graduate students, undergraduates, and faculty, and taught by Dr. Bruce Martin of the University of Michigan in cooperation with tribal leaders in northern Minnesota through the Community and Economic Development program at the College of Agricultural Sciences. Students in the course spend three weeks exploring the history of the nations, engaging in conversations with elders and community leaders (Dennis Banks, Annie Dunn, and Winona LaDuke) and participating in important ceremonies at the Red Lake reservation.  In 2004 ICIK hosted their first international conference on indigenous knowledges. Thie event entitled “Transforming the Academy” welcomed over 100 participants from around the globe.

Dr. Maretzki referenced Oscar Koagli’s “Houses of Knowledge” concept, which likens opening all indigenous knowledge to allowing everyone into all the rooms of a home, and cautiously advises against such broad access.  A survey of academic and extension employees also helped to identify barriers to including indigenous knowledge in research, teaching and outreach. These responses led to the formation of a working group on Indigenous Knowledge and Development and four-day workshop in Arusia, Tanzania which included the involvement of two rural communities. Faculty from Tumaini University and Penn State worked with community members to investigate cultural tourism of Masaii villages and Masaii learning and to develop a tourism curriculum and a cultural craft center at branch campuses.

In 2008/2009 ICIK received a $100,000 endowment from the Whiting Center which is used to support IK activities at Penn State. AcademIK Connections was developed as a video series to provide a platform for faculty to showcase how they were using indigenous knowledge in their curriculum. There are currently 12 videos in the series which include indigenous ways of knowing, sustainable forestry, and nutria-business. An ICIK hosted viewing of the film Milking the Rhino (2009) helped to illustrate how the Maasaii in Kenya and Tanzania and the Himba in Namibia use their natural resources in culturally appropriate ways, to improve their economic situations. Maretzki shared a video of a portable pot cooler that uses wet sand to pull heat away from water kept in a milk-jug container: http:mtrsolutions.weebly.com

Helen Sheehy (Penn State), who became involved with ICIK in 2010 when Maretzki approached her about collaborating with the libraries, addressed efforts to expand the reach of the program and improve its visibility. As a community gathering place, the Penn State library was a logical space for campus to come together in an interdisciplinary location. The library’s established liaison relationships with the academic departments were also useful for expanding ICIK’s interdisciplinary reach through collaboration and raising their campus visibility in a neutral territory.

 

There were no questions

 

Panel 15, June 18, 2012, 3:30pm-5:00 pm
Moderator: Teresa Chapa (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Presenters: Denise Stuempfle (Indiana University); Sara Levinson (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill); Teresa Chapa (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Rapporteur: Brenda Salem (University of Pittsburgh)

The presentations in this panel discussed collecting artist’s books from Latin America at an academic library from the perspective of librarians in acquisition, collection management, and cataloging. The moderator, Teresa Chapa, started out by introducing herself as well as the other two presenters.

The first presentation, titled, “Latin American Book Arts: Challenging Tradition and a Challenge to Collect” was given by Teresa Chapa, the librarian for Latin American, Iberian, and Latino/Latina studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC). Chapa started out by relating how she acquired her first (Ediciones) Vigía book as a new bibliographer in 2001. Each of the Vigía books is hand-made by artists in Matanzas, Cuba. The purpose of Chapa’s presentation was to inform others about the challenges of collecting Vigía books, which she was unaware of as an inexperienced bibliographer. She clarified that she would be using the general term “book arts” to describe books that come from Vigía and other books of an artistic nature because she does not have a background in art librarianship to confidently differentiate among the different kinds of artist’s books. Using that term also allows her to include the more inexpensively made “cartonera” books, as well as works of art, such as “Todos Los Mares Del Mundo” by Venezuelan artist Ricardo Benin, which cost $1,000. Throughout the presentation, she passed around several examples of book arts.

Chapa explained that book arts in Latin America are different from book arts in other countries in that Latin American book arts are more socially and politically engaged. As such, convention is disregarded, so alternative or everyday materials are used to create these books as opposed to the fine material used in conventional book arts. The structures of these books are also unconventional. She named a number of publishers throughout Latin America that specialize in book arts and described their different approaches to making books. She mentioned Eloisa Cartonera in Argentina, Ediciones Vigía in Cuba, Taller Leñateros in Mexico, and Ral Varoni in Argentina. Their unique and unconventional approaches to creating book arts create special challenges in the storage and preservation of these items in libraries.

Among the things she wishes she had considered before deciding to collect Latin American book arts were the high cost of the books, whether the books would be housed in the art library or rare book room, and whether the rare book curator or librarian would even accept the care of these books. In her case, the rare book librarian was hesitant to accept the books but was eventually won over. Still, whether or not care of these books will be accepted is something to consider when taking on such a collection. There are also the costs of housing, preserving, and cataloging the books to consider, which are significant. As an example, she talked the book titled “Altar Maya Portátil: Hechizos Mayas de Bolsillo” that consists of a miniature altar with candles, incense, figurines, and three small books. She described the creative solution to storing this collection of items devised by the preservation department. Other things to consider are how funding for the acquisition and care of these books can be justified; how these books fit into an academic curriculum; and how the collection can be promoted in order for it to be used. She went on to list possible reasons that would justify having a collection of book arts at an academic library as well as the challenges in acquiring these books. At the end of the presentation, Chapa talked about her experience in organizing an exhibit of UNC’s book arts and the activities related to the exhibit. The exhibit was named “Hecho A Mano: Book Arts of Latin America” and focused on the book arts of Cuba, Argentina, and Mexico. She stated that it was a lot of hard work, but it paid off because she now receives a lot of requests for the books. She also showed the searchable exhibit website as well as the Artist’s Books resource page in the UNC Libraries website.

The second presentation was titled, “Voices from the Margin: An Exploration of Themes in the “Libros Cartoneros” of the Indiana University Libraries Collection” and was given by Denise Stuempfle, a catalog librarian for Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies materials at Indiana University. In this presentation, Stuempfle discussed the subject treatment of “Libros Cartoneros” held at Indiana University (IU). She started her presentation by defining “Libros Cartoneros” as chapbooks manufactured by alternative publishing houses, known as “cartoneras.” The books have covers of corrugated cardboard that are hand-painted with unique designs. She then went over a brief history of the cartonera publishing houses and provided background information on the cartonero book collection at IU, which was started in 2004 and contains approximately 500 cartonero books. Stuempfle previously presented on this topic at the SALALM conference in Providence. In that presentation, she gave an overview of IU’s collection and described how they were being processed. The objectives for this particular presentation, however, were to explore the themes in the works that make up IU’s cartonera collection and to demonstrate the creation of subject access to these works using the Library of Congress’ special provisions for increased subject access to fiction.

Stuempfle talked about the practice of many academic libraries to not add subject headings when cataloging works of fiction, opting to have author and title as the main access points. The disadvantage to doing this, she asserted, is that works cannot be searched for by similar themes. Also, it is assumed that the searcher knows the exact titles and authors he or she is looking for. While this practice works for established authors, it makes cartonero books harder to find because their authors are not well known within mainstream publishing and do not have an established canon. An example of such an author is Washington Cucurto. Omitting subject headings when cataloging works of fiction, particularly cartonero books, is often a time-saving measure for catalogers dealing with a large backlog, but it puts the burden on the researcher when it comes to discovering these works. The Library of Congress has a provision for allowing the addition of subject headings when cataloging works of fiction, but these apply only to certain works, such as biographical and historical fiction, as well as animal stories. She then cited several academic articles that emphasize the importance of subject headings in works of fiction for improving discoverability. She also said that many users have expressed the same sentiment. In order to promote and improve access to the works in the cartonera collection, which the Special Collections Department already spent money in acquiring, it made sense, she concluded, to invest the time and money in providing subject access to them.

Since 2001, the Library of Congress has had special provisions for increased subject access to fiction. However, these provisions were made with public libraries in mind as a way for patrons to more easily search for recreational reading. With the exception of the New York City Public library, no public libraries have cartonero books, so cataloging and providing subject access to these books should fall upon the academic libraries, because many of them have cartonero books. Besides helping the recreational reader, subject access to fiction, she asserts, would also help save the time of the academic researcher, particularly those who might be conducting a literature research. Also, it is important to provide enhanced access to these works because the Library of Congress classification numbers for works of literature correspond to the author, not the subject matter of the work. Moreover, these provisions were aimed at English-language works, but it stands to reason that they can be applied to non-English works as well.

When it comes to providing subject access to the cartonero books at IU, certain subject headings and form subheadings are commonly used. For example, to indicate the country of publication, the subject heading “chapbooks” is used with the country of publication as a subheading. The works found in the cartonero books cover a large range of literary genres and themes. Stuempfle went on to list many of the titles held in their collection. She then made a subject analysis of three works of fiction found in the collection. The examples included La asesina de Lady Di by Alejandro Lopez, Barrio Miseria 221 by Daniel Hidalgo, and Trento by Leónidas Lamborghini. Subject headings were assigned according to the work’s individual characters, class of persons to which the primary character belongs, and settings in the story, all according to certain considerations such as the Library of Congress special provisions for subject access in works of fiction. Headings for topical access and genre headings were also assigned. In some cases, new subject headings are proposed through Subject Authority Cooperative Program (SACO).

Stuempfle ended her presentation by concluding that the thematically diverse libros cartoneros are a rich resource for literary researchers, particularly those in the field of Latin American Studies. As such, institutions with strong comparative literature, linguistics, and Latin American Studies programs should ensure that access to these works is enhanced so that scholars can benefit from them. Subject access to the humanities has been historically difficult but the problem is compounded when it comes to literature from Latin America. Stuemple considers creating enhanced access to cartonero books part of a larger effort to expand knowledge and use of Latin American and Caribbean literature.

The third presentation, titled “Creating Access to the Vigía Collection of Artists’ Books at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill” was given by Sara Levinson, a catalog librarian at UNC. In her presentation, Levinson talked of the challenges of the descriptive cataloging of UNC’s collection of Vigía artists’ books. Unlike regular books that are in roughly the same physical form in relation to each other, what sets artists’ books apart is what they look like. But to be cataloged, words can only be used to convey something that is mainly visual. The Vigía artists’ books at UNC are housed in the Rare Book Collection section of the library. They are not available in the open stacks and cannot be checked out, so the only way to access them physically is to go to the Rare Book Collection section of the library and request to see them individually. In order to give library patrons a good idea of what these books look like before they see them, Levinson tries to provide as much description as possible in order to “paint a picture” with words. She tries to imagine who would be searching for these books, what they would be searching for, and how they would search for it. She uses genre headings from the Rare Book and Manuscript controlled vocabulary, as these headings are familiar for those who work with rare book collections and those librarians who provide rare book-related reference help. She also uses headings from the Art and Architecture Thesaurus, as these books are considered art works and would be familiar to students and researchers of art, as well as to art librarians. However, these terms are not searchable in all of UNC’s catalogs, so when cataloging each item, Levinson uses long descriptive notes, which are keyword searchable. When possible, Library of Congress subject headings are also used. The materials and techniques used to create the book are often included in the description. Levinson read examples of the descriptive notes she writes in the records for these artists’ books.

Levinson ended her presentation by saying that she hoped that in providing a large number of potentially searchable words in her descriptions, patrons would be more easily able to find the records for these books. She also thanked the people who helped her in putting together her Powerpoint presentation, which included beautiful photographs of the artists’ books she described.

Questions & Comments:

Meiyolet Mendez (University of Miami) asked Levinson if she is the only cataloger who writes such detailed descriptions of artists’ books in bibliographic records and how long it takes to catalog such a book.

Levinson replied that bibliographic records for some of these books already exist, but she enhances those records by adding subject headings, genre terms, and searchable headings. The cataloging takes a while so she tries to spread the work out, but she wants to make them as complete as possible because she wants patrons to be able to find the records for these books. She ventures that in the future, when the Art and Architecture subject terms are searchable in all catalogs, such detailed descriptions won’t be necessary.

Stuempfle then asked Levinson if these record enhancements are done at the local level or if she applies them to OCLC records as well.

Levinson replied that it depends on whether she is doing original or copy cataloging. She contributes her original records to OCLC with all enhancements but if she makes any significant changes to existing OCLC records, she makes them only at the local level.

Wendy Pedersen (University of New Mexico) commented that at her institution, the catalogers have worked on artists’ books, adding detailed description as well. She then asked Stuempfle if IU’s cartonero books are special collections and what considerations are taken in shelf-listing them.

Stuempfle said that IU’s cartonero books are individually put in special preservation boxes and placed in the library’s storage. If patrons want to look at them, they can be requested and sent to the patron within half a day.

Martha Preddie (University of Trinidad and Tobago) asked Chapa what the print run for artists’ books usually are. Chapa replied that depending on the publisher, the print run might be as little as 20 to as many as 200.

Chapa added that she had not been able to bring any Vigía books to the conference because they cannot be checked out of the UNC library, but that she does have some books in her office to use as examples when she does presentations in classrooms.

Preddie then asked if the books are digitized and Chapa replied that they cannot be digitized as her institution does not hold the copyright for these books. Moreover, getting the permission to digitize the books has not been a priority for the library as they are busy digitizing other material. But for the artists’ books exhibit website, images of the featured books were digitized.

Stuempfle disclosed that she ended up with the responsibility for a box full of artists’ books that had not been cataloged when the previous art librarian had moved on to another position and that she is currently trying to figure out how to catalog them.

Sarah Leroy (University of Pittsburgh) asked whether the multiple copies of artists’ books are meant to be identical in spite of a small print run. Having them being identical, she added, would make it easier to use a bibliographic record for different copies.

Chapa replied that usually, copies in a print run are identical. Leroy said that it would be useless to write a detailed description of a cartonero book in an OCLC record since each cover in a relatively large print run of a cartonero book is different.

Stuemple and Chapa explained how the creation processes of cartonero books and artists’ books like the ones at Vigía differ from each other. Levinson added that artists’ books, unlike cartonero books, are numbered.

Luis A. González (Indiana University) asked Chapa if she had ever been challenged to justify the acquisition of artist books.

Chapa replied that putting together the exhibit on artists books helped to get support from the library director. The library’s new rare book curator is a bit resistant about accepting the care of the books, but the assistant art librarian, who is a book artist, has been very supportive and promotes the materials.

The panel concluded with the moderator thanking the rapporteur and the presenters.

 

 

 

SALALM LVI
Saturday, May 28, 2011 9:00 – 10:00am

Participaron 15 personas.

Se entregó un informe impreso de Lynn Shirey (de Harvard University) sobre el proyecto piloto sobre “Digitalization of U.S. Holdings of 19th Century Cuban Monographs.”

Eudora Loh (de UCLA) y Teresa Chapa (de University of North Carolina, Chapel  Hill) hicieron un reporte sobre un viaje de adquisiciones realizado a Cuba en febrero/marzo de 2011 y entregaron un informe impreso “Cuba Contacts”, con nombres y direcciones de librerías, centros de estudio y editoriales de Cuba.

Mei Méndez (de University of Miami) informó sobre un importante trabajo que está realizando University of Miami sobre “Teatro Cubano.”

Se intercambiaron ideas y experiencias sobre los problemas de los envíos de libros desde Cuba al exterior.

Luis A. Retta
Retta Libros
Nuevo e-mail : rettalib@chasque.net

 

SALALM LVI
Saturday, May 28, 2011, 11:00 AM – 12:30pm

Attendees: Members: Laura D. Shedenhelm (University of Georgia); Paula Covington (Vanderbilt University); David Nolen (Mississippi State University) ; Richard Phillips, Peter S. Bushnell, Paul Losch ( University of Florida); Adan Benavides, David Block (University of Texas at Austin); Gayle Williams (Florida International University); Hortensia Calvo ( Tulane University); Sarah Buck Kachaluba (Florida State University); Meiyolet Méndez (University of Miami); Holly Ackerman (Duke University); Teresa Chapa (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Non-members: Tomás Bocanegra (Colegio de México); Gerada Holder (NALIS); Sofía Becerra-Licha (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill); Margarita Vannini (IHNCA, Universidad Centroamericana)

Teresa Chapa (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), the LASER Convener, opened the meeting by remarking on the gratifyingly large number of attendees. Introductions followed. A list was circulated for attendance and for those who want their names added to the LASER listserv.

Holly Ackerman moved that minutes of the last meeting be accepted. Laura Shedenhelm seconded and minutes were unanimously approved.
Teresa reminded the group that institutional updates will not be reviewed at the LASER meetings but will be sent out on the listserv.
Teresa announced that this was the 25th anniversary of ENLACE and encouraged our participation.

Teresa reviewed the themes from out last meeting – collaboration and cooperation in collection development. How to achieve greater coordination is the key. David Block summarized our efforts to date. In New Orleans we agreed to share information on whether we would purchase offers sent from one vendor for Andean publications. David pointed out that we do not need 12-20 copies of a work. Following the meeting in New Orleans, David sent out offers for collective consideration and we initially were indicating the intention to buy an item. It seemed that we were not reducing the number of institutions acquiring titles. As the experiment progressed we felt comfortable indicating that we would not buy an item. Gayle Williams asserted that it was still too early to judge the success of this experiment.

Richard Phillips questioned what the relationship of this experiment was to the Farmington Plan wherein universities had committed themselves to collecting along lines of faculty and institutional strength. Richard added that under the Farmington Plan, Florida has been committed to collecting on the Caribbean for so long that it would make no sense for them to alter that pattern or to reduce the amount they buy. Teresa pointed out that, in contrast to the Farmington commitments, our current efforts are regional rather than national and that they are informal. She reminded the group that we had also discussed dividing up deep collecting by choosing to collect comprehensively on selected Mexican states. Mai Mendez suggested that we also do this by publisher and/or state in Argentina. She offered to draw up a list of publishers derived from the approval plan from her university and to circulate it to LASER members.
David felt we needed more specificity as far as what our specialties include. Phil MacLeod suggested that we define a core and then divide up the more detailed subjects. Adan Benavides pointed out that some vendors’ catalogs, for example those from Books from Mexico, show which institutions have received a book on approval thus allowing us to see the extent to which a book is held in our region. Paula Covington thought that we need to focus on lists earlier in the selection process. David recommended that we organize around some benchmarks such as assuring that one institution has the national gazette and a major newspaper for each country. The need for coordination among SALALM’s regional groups was also discussed and Teresa Chapa agreed to talk with the conveners of the other regional groups to let them know what we are doing and to see what collaborative efforts they may have in place.
David suggested we select a country for which no LASER library has collecting responsibility and try a cooperative experiment to avoid overlap and to increase uniqueness. The possibility of a Central American country was discussed. Phil and Laura described the cooperative efforts they have in place with Emory buying in the social sciences and Georgia selecting in the Humanities. They compare invoices and identify duplication and core authors and subjects and are now coordinating their plans through Vientos Tropicales.
Laura agreed to coordinate an experiment on Paraguayan imprints. Participating institutions are Duke, Emory, Texas, U. Georgia, U. Miami, UNC. Laura will contact the group regarding next steps.
Paula reminded us that the LASER website is now at Vanderbilt and that she would like to receive suggestions on features to be added to the site. She demonstrated a website constructed in Omni software. She would like to convert the LASER page to an Omni format but does not want to do so unless other LASER institutions have OMNI so that the site can move to another institution with minimal difficulty. Members will check with their institution and report back to Paula. Suggestions for website additions included: a listing of digital libraries; a chart showing institutional collection strengths; acquisitions news; lists of OP vendors by country; and a LASER blog. Paula requested that members send updates to their microfilm union list this summer.
The meeting adjourned at 12:30.

 

Teresa Chapa, Convener
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill