Currently viewing the tag: "Suzanne M. Schadl"

Moderator: David Dressing, University of Notre Dame
Rapporteur: Marisol Ramos, University of Connecticut

David Dressing, University of Notre Dame: The purpose of panel was to discuss the history of both organizations inside the bigger structure of CRL and clarify the difference between LAMP and LARRP mission.

Judy Alspach—Building on A history of Collaboration: The evolution of LAMP and LARRP

Judy Alspach, CRL Area Studies Program Manager, offered a brief history of CRL and LAMP and LARRP to give a historical context to their creation and original missions.

CRL was founded in 1949 and located in High Park neighborhood in Chicago. It supports original research in the humanities, sciences and social sciences through physical and electronic collections. It also supports collective decision-making among its members. These include consortia purchases of electronic databases or microfilms collections, pre-archiving, etc. Originally, CRL started with ten founding institutions from the Midwest. Right now they have over 200 North American members in the US and Canada and their recently added new membership category, Global members include Germany, India, Hong Kong. Members get the following benefits:

  • Extended Interlibrary Loan of CRL collection
  • Digital Delivery of CRL materials
  • Access to LLMC-Digital Cooperative collection programs and services
  • Licensing of specialized databases
  • Access to Charleston Advisor

Under CRL there are six projects that Judy referred to as the “AMPs”, which work to acquire library and archival materials from different world regions. The first one created was the Cooperative Africana Materials Project (CAMP) founded in 1963, LAMP was the fourth AMP created in 1975. There are 49 members and currently they pay $765 in dues.

LAMP: When originally constituted, LAMP focused first in acquiring microfilm materials from Mexico and Brazil based on an analysis of the needs of the 16 members at the time. Choosing these countries was a strategic decision by the members as they started this collaborative collection building in areas of great interests for the membership. At that time, LAMP purchased microfilm and did original microfilming.  For a complete history visit, http://www.crl.edu/pt-br/area-studies/lamp/membership-information/project-history. Judy encouraged the LAMP members in the audience to continue this strategic thinking when considering projects and purchases so gaps can be filled based on the collective needs of institutional members.

Today, LAMP continues to acquire newspapers, archival collections, government documents, periodicals, ephemera and other rare material from/about Latin America but it is not limited to just buying microfilm or microfiche, or microfilming materials but it has expanded its mission to support digitization projects. There are over 10,000 reels available for lending to LAMP members.

LARRP (Latin Americanist Research Resources Project) was launched in 1994. When it started there were 20 members and now there are 46 paying $900 in annual membership dues. Seven LARRP partners in Latin America do not pay dues but they have historically contributed to LARRP projects. LARRP was launched with the help of several grants: a matching grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and two TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information Access) grants from the U.S. Dept. of Education in 1999-2002. The first grant for $405,000 purchased equipment and anything else necessary to support LARRP work and the second of $585,000 supported the acquisition of Latin American grey literature in the social sciences to be shared through an Open Archives Portal.

LARRP had always been about collaboration and open access to information from Latin America and the Caribbean as some of the early initiatives attested. For example, LAPTOP (The Latin American Periodicals Tables of Contents) was started in 1994 to give access to print journals from Latin American and the Caribbean not indexed elsewhere. LARRP members contributed content from 1994-2009. Currently this legacy database is hosted at Vanderbilt University and it is available for searches at http://laptoc.library.vanderbilt.edu/query/basic_search.jsp. The focus has not been collection building like LAMP but to create access to hard to find information.

Another example is LAOAP (The Latin American Open Archives Portal) a project created to provide scholars with a portal to find grey literature created in Latin America and the Caribbean. Currently it is hosted through LANIC at the University of Texas-Austin, http://lanic.utexas.edu/project/laoap/. LAOAP includes working documents, preprints, research papers, statistical documents, and other difficult-to-access material published by research institutions, nongovernmental organizations, and peripheral agencies, and that are not controlled by commercial publishers. Major contributors to this project include Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales-Chile (FLACSO-Chile) and Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica (CIRMA).

Finally, LARRP has for many years supported a collaborative collection development project called the Distributed Resources Project where each member of LARRP commits 7% of their collection budget to purchase monographs and other materials in their declared area of focus (geographical area or around a topic, folklore, music, etc…). The total reallocated funding has been more than $170,000 per year.

Melissa Guy—LARRP Today: Strategic Directions and a Vision for the future

Melissa presented on the big transition and new directions that LARRP undertook back in 2012 when all grant-funded projects were done or winding down. In a LARRP executive meeting at Austin in 2012, Dan Hazen raised the question of what to do next? What else LARRP should be doing besides paying for the Advisory Board members to meet, now that these projects were over or almost over? They decided to strategically plan new directions. For that purpose and as a suggestion from Judy Alspach, LARRP Advisory Board draft their first By-laws to formalize the governing structure of the organization and allow more participation beyond the Advisory Board by creating Working Groups that would assist them in moving forward. The By-laws were approved in 2014, together with the election of chairs and new working groups.

Although the core mission of LARRP remained the same, a new document was developed. This Strategic Directions Document created to guide the creation of new activities into the future.

Three areas were identified as priorities:

1)      Access to primary sources through digital initiatives. E.g. the Princeton Ephemera digitization project.

2)      Collections analysis and the continuation of the Distributive Resources Program (DRP) (mentioned by Judy).

  1. The data that will be gathered will be use to better communicate with administrators the value of LARRP projects to participating members and to help plan better collection development activities that will benefit all members.

3)      Promote visibility of Latin American and Caribbean content in various arenas including indexes, web-scale discovery solutions, and other similar tools.

Working groups were created to tackle these issues. Some of the activities assigned to these working groups already had been done through committee in the old structure but the creation of the new structure promises to allow for better focus and participation from the membership at large. The working groups include:

Communication and Outreach (chaired by Teresa Chapa): Main charge is to advertise and promote LARRP projects and serve as a liaison with the broader Latin Americanist community. A recent addition to the group’s duties includes encouraging and facilitating membership and participation in LARRP.

Collaborative Collections and Analysis (chaired by Paul Losch) – promotes the expansion of the Latin American Studies collection by analyzing its members’ acquisitions trends and encouraging deep collecting in specific areas of interest. It is responsible to continue the work of DRP.

Digital Initiatives Working Group (chaired by Mei Mendez): focus on increasing access to primary sources for research on Latin America through digitization and other initiatives. Post-custodial archives may become a priority for this group.

Resource Discovery Working Group (chaired by David Dressing) is a completely new group that facilitates the visibility of research resources for Latin America. This group will work with content aggregators, discovery tool providers, and other information creators for the benefit of the Latin Americanist research community.

There will be opportunities for LARRP members to become involved in all of these initiatives. A call will go out after the SALALM meeting.

In October 2014, the new elected working groups chairs, members at large, and the rest of the advisory committee (both current and “legacy members”) met in Chicago to start working on goals and objectives for each working group. One goal of great importance was the drafting of new criteria for LARRP proposals. Mei Mendez, chair of Digital Initiatives, led on this task. The resulting document served to clarify many issues regarding the type of projects that LARRP will support from now on, both from the membership and the advisory board. During this meeting, the new Strategic document guided the discussion on what the criteria should be for projects, based on 6 principles found in the document:

1)      Work within existing systems, rather than building new infrastructure

2)      Adhere to open access principles

3)      Support scholarship in a variety of disciplines

4)      Provide models for future collaboration

5)      Involve institutional partners within Latin American whenever possible

6)      Provide added value to the Latin Americanist research community as a whole

The 2015-2016 call for proposals was the first submitted under the new criteria. Several traditional digitization projects were received, but also a request for an endorsement of an Argentine open access approval plan project.

What is next?

  1. LARRP will continue to be an entity that vets and provides funding and support for open access projects. A new faculty rep was selected, Gustavo Fischman from Arizona State, who has a solid academic background in this area, particularly focused on Mexico and Brazil.
  2. Through our new working group setup, LARRP is in the position to take on some of the major issues and challenges facing Latin American and Area Studies librarianship

Melissa finished her presentation by thanking Dan Hazen for being the inspiration to the changes that LARRP experienced in the last several years. He asked the hard questions that enabled the group to justify the dues we gather from our members, to collaborate with partners in Latin America, and to lead the way in international librarianship. Melissa expressed her commitment to honor Hazen’s legacy by pushing LARRP in this new directions.

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico—LAMP (CRL): Collaborative Preservation of Brazilian Primary Source Materials

Suzanne opened her presentation with a note on the relevance of microfilm, which remains a reliable and accessible preservation method that does not depend on software and can still be accessed in the absence of electricity by placing it in front of a light source. More importantly, engaging in microfilming archival projects helps expand the amount of critical primary sources from Latin American and Caribbean. LAMP plays a big role helping international institutions to preserve their archival collections through microfilm projects, and making them accessible to institutional members in United States and Canada.

Instead of talking about the history of LAMP—which Judy from CRL had already covered, Suzanne chose to address specific examples of LAMP projects that connect with the theme of the conference, “Brazil in the World, the World in Brazil: Research Trends and Library Resources.” These example showcase cooperative engagement and partnerships across boundaries. They showcase how microfilming and digitization as well as LAMP and LARRP complement each other. Suzanne noted that she had a personal reason to pick these examples: As a graduate student, some of the materials from Brazil that LAMP helped preserved were vital to her own dissertation research.

In the context of the conference theme, LAMP is dealing with the same issues being discussed in the conference: the need to build sustainable practices through collaboration/cooperation and partnerships, and the need to provide library services that support learning and research in higher education (Discovery, Knowledge, and Design). For Suzanne, LAMP has excelled especially in the area of knowledge by preserving and making accessible rare and difficult to access materials. She emphasized that this history of collaboration and cooperation in LAMP (and LARRP) reflected library trends current today such as the 2015 ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee which emphasized “deeper collaboration” as a unifying theme under new trends, looking specifically at “data, device neutral digital services, evolving openness in higher education, student success initiatives, competency-based learning, altmetrics, and digital humanities”.

Suzanne discussed the history and background of the Brazilian Government Document project. This LAMP project funded in 1994 by a Mellon Foundation grant, aimed to explore the viability of digitizing microfilm. LAMP engaged the Biblioteca Nacional and the Arquivo Nacional  to collaborate in the scanning and indexing a selection of 19th and 20th century Brazilian Government documents of great importance in the history of the country: Provincial Presidential Reports (1830-1930) Presidential Messages  (1889-1993) Almanak Laemmert  (1844-1889) Ministerial Reports  (1821-1960) from microfilm [to learn more about this project visit, http://www-apps.crl.edu/brazil] LAMP representatives including Scott Van Jacob, David Block, Ann Hartness, Dan Hazen, Marlys Rudeen, and James Simon worked in collaboration with the University of Notre Dame, Cornell University, University of Texas at Austin, Harvard College Library, Center for Research Libraries, and the Biblioteca Nacional, Arquivo Nacional to coordinate this project.

Suzanne asked, what has changed in LAMP? Have the means changed, the purposes? Is there still a reason for preserving materials through cooperative agreements? And if the mean have changed, what have we learned from actions of the past? To compare the past with the present, Suzanne shared highlights from a report by Scott Van Jacob about the Brazilian Government Document Project. Van Jacob reported that the BGDP project increased scholarly access to rare materials by expanding these corpus through digitalization. It also implemented new mechanisms for better bibliographic and structured access and indexing, explored levels of demand and patterns of use through assessment and statistics, and helped refine the process of creating digital image files from preservation microfilm.

What new directions is LAMP taking in its cooperative projects? Suzanne mentioned improving access to data, working to develop new device-neutral digital services; inspiring new evolving models that promote openness in higher education; encouraging initiatives for student success and competency-based learning; and offering alternatives and new models such as Altmetrics and digital humanities.

An example that Suzanne discussed briefly and that showcased similar ideas is the case of Ann Hartness’ Subject Guide to Statistics in the Presidential Reports of the Brazilian Provinces 1830-1889 printed in 1977 by the Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin. This print source was later digitized to increase access of both the bibliographic information and the digitized materials, see the Hartness’ Guide to Statistical Information at http://brazil.crl.edu/bsd/bsd/hartness/index.html.

Suzanne asked: How do we expand partnership (old and new) in the future? LAMP is committed to exploring new and expand old partnerships to promote digital humanities, for examples, by continuing what LAMP already is good at: Set the standards for preservation and selection of content and we have readings related to that content. The new direction should include finding collaborators with experience in design to help us design better interfaces for content.

Finally, she briefly mentioned a project that served as an example of the way forward – a model for how collaboration might help achieve greater accessibility. The recently finished Brazil: Nunca Mais Project, is a microfilm collection that was digitized to increase access  http://www.crl.edu/impact/brazilian-human-rights-evidence-preserved-nunca-mais-project and http://bnmdigital.mpf.mp.br/#!/ This project not only offers access to over 1,000,000 digitized records that document human rights violations by the Brazilian Military Court from 1964-1979 but also have an interface that allow searches across all the documents in the collection. Check out other LAMP projects at http://www.crl.edu/area-studies/lamp/collections/guides

Comments:

Gail Williams, Florida International University: Shared historical background about LARRP. She reminded people that originally LARRP was founded under the auspices of ARL (Academic Research Libraries) but in 2005-2006 they decided to let LARRP moved to CRL.

Other historical tidbits: In the 1990s there was discussion to hire agents in Mexico and other key countries to collect extensively ephemera but that plans did not happen.

Finally, Gail asked the question, what is the difference between LAMP and LARRP? Should they co-exist? Or should they merge? She felt at this point that “we still do not have the answer to those questions”.

Judy Alspach, CRL: To answer Gail’s questions here are some considerations. She shared a slide that shows the differences and commonalities between the two groups. She mentioned that she sees a couple of different scales, but also a continuum between LAMP and LARRP that can serve as a guideline to think about these two groups.

Differences:

  • One of the main differences between LAMP and LARRP is that LAMP’s main concern is to build and own collections, while LARRP is not interested in building collections of materials.
  • Collaboration is important for both groups but for LARRP collaboration between members is expected, and many projects in LARRP encourage active participation of all its members one way or another. While for LAMP, although collaboration is considered important, all members are not required or expected to participate in the same projects in the same way as LARRP does. For example, LAMP members contribute with monies to collectively purchase, microfilm or digitize materials, while in LARRP, projects such as the Distribute Resource Project, or the past LAPTOC project, needed the participate of all (or most) of its members for its success.
  • [Later added by Judy as part of AJ Johnson, UT-Austin, comments]. LAMP always had a commitment to invest in the “preservation for access” of rare and endanger primary materials as part of their core mission.

Commonalities:

  • Both groups articulate the value of involving international partners in an on-going contributing way
  • Both groups believe in open access. Both groups promote projects that benefit the broader Latin American research community as a whole. Both groups support projects that contain elements with broad appeal to its members, and non-members as well

Melissa Guy, Arizona State University: Regarding demarcation between LAMP and LARRP. She commented that although there are similarities between both groups and even projects that both group may fund together, because the new Strategic Directions Document created recently, and the new working groups created based on these new directions for LARRP, it will mean that new projects will tackle bigger and broader issues, beyond digitization.

Gail Williams, Florida International University: Gail reminded people that LARRP since the beginning was able to tackle big granted projects by having members institutions volunteer to be PIs (Principal Investigator), for example UT-Austin and UCLA.

David Dressing, Notre Dame: Agreed with AJ Johnson that LAMP’s core mission is preservation and that LARRP mission is finding way to give more access to information instead of getting content available. He also asked how technology changes will affect LARRP’s mission to find new ways to make information and content more available.

Melissa Guy, Arizona State University: Melissa addressed this issue by saying that LARRP after the experience with LAPTOC decided to stop chasing technology. LARRP’s job is not creating infrastructures that may become obsolete through time. LARRP will focus instead for on discoverability and working with vendors and providers to educate on how to make Latin American and Caribbean materials more discoverable using their tools. The Resources Discovery working group was created to tackle these issues. s.

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico: Suzanne added that we should consider other models such as the archival post-custodial model. Also she sees LARRP as a broker between international partners and our university administrators to justify purchases of technology that will benefit partners and hopefully avoid unnecessary bureaucracy. Instead of trying to do projects individually, LARRP can do it as a group.

Judy Alspach, CRL: Judy mentioned that one of the biggest challenges moving forward is tackling copyright issues related to technology and access. CRL can control access through IP address so only members can access materials with copyright issues but that may defeat open access efforts. Also, technology capacity is an issue. She used as an example an audio files proposal discussed recently in the LARRP meeting which she declared at this point may be impossible to tackle by CRL/LAMP/LARRP because they have not the technology to handle audio files yet. She felt the project was more appropriate for LAMP since it has a preservation component. But she admitted that sometimes it is difficult to decide what can be done with a project because of copyrights and capability issues.

Chris Hernández, Tulane U.: She asked clarification regarding LAMP and LARRP guidelines since she felt that they were confusing when she was deciding which group to apply for the audio files projects referred by Judy. Chris thought that her project did not qualify for LAMP because in the website it said that LAMP was more interested in preserving “newsworthy” content and her project contains content that is entertainment related.

Marisol Ramos, University of Connecticut: She reminded panelists that CRL staff and LAMP and LARRP advisory committee members are available for consultation and clarification regarding projects suitability and which group is more appropriate for applications We welcome all questions, so don’t hesitate to ask. She expressed that regarding the Tulane project, the material in question had incredible scholarly value for researchers so it is appropriate for LAMP. Suzanne M. Schadl (UNM) mentioned that this confusion may have occurred because the website is listing past projects which included many newspaper microfilm projects.

Marisol Ramos (UConn), also made the suggestion that CRL should have an in-house expert regarding copyright issues or to contact experts in the copyright issues in libraries/archives on behalf of its members when such questions arise. For example, she reached out to Peter Hirtle, an archivist and Senior Policy Advisor to the Cornell University Library with a special mandate to address intellectual property issues, for advice regarding the Tulane proposal’s copyright issues. He was very gracious and he sent his response to Chris Hernández with very good advice. We should identify such experts and make sure that we at CRL/LAMP/LARRP are abreast of these issues and make that information available to all our members to help them when considering writing a proposal with an open access component.

John Wright, Brigham Young University: John asked if LARRP and LAMP could push for a series of seminar for faculty and students to promote LARRP and LAMP content/projects/collections. He felt that both LARRP and LAMP need to promote their work and collections. Melissa Guy (ASU), answered that she liked the idea of the seminars and that is something that the Communication and Outreach Working Group can explore more.

Lynn Shirey, Harvard University: Lynn asked for clarification if to apply for grant money from LAMP or LARRP, does the applicant need to be member of these groups or can non-members apply for funding? What about international applicants?

Judy Alspach, CRL: Judy said that they will like to encourage new memberships for either LAMP or LARRP since membership support the work of these groups but both groups will consider applications from non-members. Similarly, it is not require that international applicants be members but it helps a lot if they team up with a LAMP or LARRP member to help them with their application/project.

Molly Molloy, New Mexico State University: Molly had the last word before closing the panel. She explained that the advantage of membership is that the monies collected from the dues are used to fund all the great projects discussed today. The more members are in LAMP and/or LARRP the more projects can be funded.

 

Moderator: Gayle A. Williams, Florida International University
Rapporteur: Jade Kara Mishler, Tulane University

Presenters:
T-Kay Sangwand, University of Texas at Austin
A procura da batida perfeita: The Art of (Collecting) Brazilian Hip Hop

Suzanne M. Schadl & Viviane Ferreira de Faria, University of New Mexico
Borderlands Reinvented and Revisited: Third Space Intersections of Portuguese Language Literature in Print and Image

Sócrates Silva, University of California, Santa Barbara
Samba, choro, baião: Documenting Early Brazilian Sound Recordings at the UCSB Library

Donald M. Vorp, Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Studying Brazilian Christianity in Princeton

T-Kay Sangwand presented on collecting Brazilian hip hop at the University of Texas.  She spoke about the historical trajectory of hip hop and identified trends and gaps in the scholarly conversation. T-Kay explained different ways in which she has obtained Brazilian hip hop materials for the library.  She has had success working with vendors.  LC Rio had been particularly amenable to acquiring a subscription to “Rap Nacional,” a key Brazilian hip hop journal.  Through acquisitions trips T-Kay was able to attend hip hop shows, buy directly from artists and access the underground hip hop scene.  T-Kay has worked directly with graduate students and faculty to identify materials of interest.  Lastly, T-Kay recognized potential challenges that collecting hip hop presents.   She spoke about audiovisual material being published on the internet through blogs, websites, and youtube, as well as important hip hop groups that function primarily on Facebook.  She asked, “How can the library capture these types of material and provide access to them?”

Suzanne M. Schadl and Viviane Ferreira de Faria presented on two art exhibitions they curated: “AfroBrasil: Art and Identities” in August 2015 and “Borderlands Reinvented and Revisited: Portuguese Language and Literature in Print and Image” in fall 2015.  Viviane explained that they designed the exhibitions with the following users in mind: the academic community, library users, the local community and the international community.  Both exhibits were comprised of library collections, including special collections, canonical texts, cordeis, cartoneras, graphic novels, and films. They creatively used the space. Local musicians were invited to the opening reception of the “Borderlands” exhibit.  The “AfroBrasil” exhibit included Candomblé altars.

Sócrates Silva presented on two current initiatives at the UCSB Library to document music production.  The first, Discography of American Historical Recordings (DAHR), is a database that documents the output of American record companies during the 78rpm era.  DAHR includes more than 100,000 master recordings (matrixes).  There are 467 Brazilian Victor recordings in the database that were added from secondary sources.   In 2012 the USCB Library received a $239,600 grant in order to Catalog 18,000 78s from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, France, Mexico, Peru, Portugal and Spain from the 1900s-1960s (the bulk of them are from 1900s-1940s).

Donald M. Vorp presented on the Princeton Theological Seminary Library and their collections. The Seminary Library houses more than a million items and is considered one of the premier theological research centers. In the 1970′s Latin American and Iberian materials started being collected at the Seminary Library.  There are now more than 25,000 volumes in Spanish and Portuguese and 1,300 current and historical periodicals from Latin American and the Iberian Peninsula. Donald explained that the Seminary Library has numerous collections of interest for the study of Brazilian Christianity/Christianities.  Of Special note are the microfilm collections, such as the Iglesia en Brasil collection.  The library also has relevant journals, such as “Estudos Biblicos,” “Revista de Interpretação Biblica Latino-Americana,” and “Estudos de Religião.”  Some Brazilian theologians are active participants in the Global Network for Public Theology that was founded at the Center of Theological Inquiry in Princeton in 2007.  The Global Network is associated with the “International Journal of Public Theology,” which devoted a special issue in 2012 to “Public Theology in Brazil”.

Jade Mishler asked Suzanne M. Schadl and Viviane Ferreira de Faria if putting together scholarly and popular resources and working with the public at large was an idea born in the library or if it was directly related to a larger university mission.   Viviane said that these ideas were generated out of the library.   They wanted to make the special collections more accessible, visible and to integrate them.  Suzanne said it came out of trying to challenge a healthy collection budget with materials that are primary in scope, and could be utilized by students, community members, graduate students and faculty members.   She said that there is an ongoing administrative-level and faculty level conversation at UNM about community engagement.

Carlos Navarro (University of New Mexico) asked if there is hip hop coming out of favelas in Rio.  T-Kay said that Baile Funk came out of Rio and is similar to hip hop in some ways.  She contrasted the drug trafficking and consumerist lyrics in Baile Funk  with more politically conscious hip hop lyrics.  T-Kay said that there is some politically conscious hip hop coming out of Rio.  There are community centers that are trying to attract members with hip hop.

T-Kay asked Donald if there are music ethnologists or theologians looking at the evangelist messages in Brazilian gospel rap.  Donald said he wasn’t aware of any theologians working on that.

Gayle Williams asked T-Kay if she’s seen Cordel Literature that is about hip hop or hip hop that mentions Cordel literature.  T-Kay said she’s not that familiar with Cordel literature and isn’t sure.  Viviane said that Cordel literature tends to react to everything and she wouldn’t be surprised.   Suzanne said that some Samba artists were featured in the Cordel literature in their exhibit.

Viviane asked Donald how he has perceived the ascendance of Evangelism in Brazil with both the people and within congress.  She asked if Donald could foresee the election of an Evangelic president within the next two elections.  Donald said there are internal conflicts among the Brazilian evangelicals  and it’s been interesting to see how one group ascends over the other.  He said there are a growing number of evangelicals trying to engage with social realities in Brazilian culture, which leads them to political engagement.

Moderator:      Alison Hicks, University of Colorado, Boulder
Rapporteur:    Melissa Gasparotto, Rutgers University

Presenters
Paula Covington, Vanderbilt University
Latin American Digital Projects: Student, Faculty and Library Collaborations at Vanderbilt University

Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia
Because Learning Is Not Just for Students: Information Literacy for Faculty

Sarah Buck Kachaluba, Florida State University
Follow Up to “From Dub Assessment to Smart Assessment”: Adaptions for FSU Libraries

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
Tagging ASARO: A UNM Experiment in Crowd-Sourcing and Collection Development

Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York Libraries (CUNY)
Teach With Music

Molly E. Molloy, New Mexico State University
The Femicide Fallacy

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan
Don Quixote in English: A Chronology: A Digital Humanities Project for the Classroom

Paula presented on a Dean’s fellows program at Vanderbilt Libraries to pair advanced undergraduates and graduate students with a librarian mentor, usually to work on digitization projects (this can include metadata, digitizing, etc.). Many students end up using these digital collections when working on their dissertations, too.

She gave several examples of current fellows and their projects.

●       Helguera Collection of Colombiana
This Colombia-in-the-19th-century project includes descriptive thematic essays. The essays are done as a separate independent study. The collection includes broadsides, pamphlets and programas.
●       Oral histories from the Manuel Zapata Olivella Papers
Zapata Olivella was an Afro-Colombian novelist and anthropologist. The collection includes transcriptions of interviews with ancianos that students in colegios across Colombia interviewed. The hope is to add tapes at some point.
●       Ecclesiastical & Secular Sources for Slave Societies
This project digitally preserves Cuban, Colombian and Brazilian church and clerical documents relating to Africans and Afro-decedents. Among its uses is genealogy.

Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia
Because Learning Is Not Just for Students: Information Literacy for Faculty

Anne presented on teaching information literacy workshops for faculty at University of West Georgia. She noted that faculty may have tunnel vision, and can be hard to reach with librarians’ information literacy message. They’re pulled in several directions already, but are also envious that librarians have the opportunity to go to conferences where they learn to teach and about new research in pedagogy. Anne established a workshop series called “GoodLibrations: Because learning is not just for students,” in response to this need. She provided food and alcohol as an incentive to attend.

Some of the topics included: leveraging Google apps, information ethics, using Adobe Creative Suite, practices for teaching critical thinking, Endnote, a celebration of faculty research that was especially popular, and a promotion & tenure dossier workshop. The topics were chosen by questionnaire.

Anne also helped plan and organized the Innovations in pedagogy conference, to address lack of pedagogy instruction for faculty. To help learn about how to teach faculty, she attended POD.

Sarah Buck Kachaluba, Florida State University
Follow Up to “From Dumb Assessment to Smart Assessment”: Adaptions for FSU Libraries

Sarah attended the “From Dumb Assessment to Smart Assessment” session at SALALM and got a lot out of it. She incorporated a version of that workshop into the FSU Libraries public services retreat. She developed 3 power points (active learning, writing student learning outcomes and one on assessment) that were heavily cribbed from Alison Hicks, Anne Barnhart, Meghan Lacey & AJ Johnson. She also developed templates for writing student outcomes for different disciplines. A few liaisons who did a lot of instruction found it very useful.

There were, however, limitations: some folks in mid management were pulled away in the middle and they would have benefitted. Moreover, nly public services librarians were there so some liaisons missed out.

Sarah detailed the ways she’s incorporated these strategies into her own instruction:

●       She’s started handing out worksheets for students to work in pairs to brainstorm resources they could use to find primary and secondary sources, and posting these worksheets on a wall so others could provide feedback. This didn’t work very well, so now she’s developed pre and post-session assessment handouts.

  • The pre- asks students why their research topics are and to identify things they want to learn during the session.
  • The post- asks for 1-3 things students learned and 1 thing they want to learn in the next sessions

She has gotten positive feedback from this
●       Sarah has also developed and taught a 3-hour session, where she used the worksheet again. This gave her productive feedback to use as they searched. She asked students to send her one resource they found during the session but few followed through.

The assessment workshop skills she learned have also helped her in other ways: she recently was able to help a colleague who needed to write student learning outcomes for a conference panel proposal.

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
Tagging ASARO: A UNM Experiment in Crowd-Sourcing and Collection Development

Suzanne talked about her work on the exhibit, Tagging ASARO: UNM experiment in crowd-sourcing and collection development (done with Mike Graham de la Rosa among others) at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

Various people were involved in the design of the exhibit, including Americorps interns who brought their own stenciling art skills to the installation because of how inspired they were by ASARO’s work.

ASARO: Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca  is participatory and about “getting up” and getting the word out. They use varied formats and venues. The goal of the exhibit was to transform and reframe work of this collective for the in the spirit of their own work but in a different context. The exhibit alters the context and creates dialogue – making connections between Oaxaca and Albuquerque. Suzanne has been working with Archive-it to archive digital files uploaded to ASARO website

The crowdsourcing element of the exhibit involved asking visitors to “tag” items using notecards. This was designed to foster community engagement with library. This crowdsourcing wasn’t so much about outsourcing descriptions and metadata but rather a “getting up” community response in the archives. (There was an issue with word “tag” and it’s multiple meanings. So it was important to encourage people to tag but not bring spray paint!)

There are going to be 5 community forums around the exhibit. The first one was a poetry slam with Nolan Eskeets. The tags and performances from this event are now part of this collection as well.

In two months they’ve had many cards posted, but nothing from the online component has been tagged. There is one place where comments not being posted. -The cave. This is in a different media format, so perhaps visitors are less able to interact with it than something in a frame on a wall.

Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York Libraries (CUNY)
Teach With Music

Daisy observed that film is a preferred AV teaching tool in the classroom. She sent out a survey for Latin American Studies faculty on use of AV in LAS teaching. One professor suggested making a database, which she did using Omeka and it’s called Teach with Music. Currently it is hosted on her personal website: daisilla.org/omeka

The database includes titles of songs along with subjects, tags, a description, and how it can be used in education, all of which is contributed from LAS faculty. She demonstrated the usefulness of the database by playing some clips. One song about Oscar Romero has been used to talk about the church in a positive way via church activism. Another song, Zumbi by Jorge Ben, was suggested by a professor because it can be used to talk about plantation work by maroons, and the complexity of slave experience.

There are plans to connect this database to other databases like HAPI to help give thematic context to the themes explored in the songs.

Molly E. Molloy, New Mexico State University
The Femicide Fallacy

Molly presented about the news coverage about Juarez that has been dominated by femicide. She described the sensationalized coverage of sexualized murders of women in Juarez, arguing that this is not representative of the facts, and distracts from the problems facing the city. The picture is much more complicated that presented in the media because women are killed for a variety of reasons that may not have to do with their gender. She documented the various movies, books and pop culture references to the murders of women in Juarez, noting that much of the “information” available is speculation and not founded by reputable sources. The main book responsible for this perception is Cosecha de Mujeres, which brought the issue to public recognition, but the book is very poorly sourced.

Actual numbers reveal that a small percentage of homicides are women (9% of victims on average over 24 years). By comparison, in US that percentage is 22%. The Philadelphia Inquirer did an interactive database with charts of murders by gender, comparing Juarez and Philadelphia (because Philadelphia is similar in population). Juarez numbers are much higher for most years. However at the peak of hyper violence beginning in 2008, the rate really spikes incredibly. Women’s rates go up in tandem with men’s, however, not nearly as much. But both are higher than rates of murder in Philly. The murder rate spiked in 2008-2011, but is now on steep decline. In news articles searching, 9.2% of articles about Juarez are about femicide but in academic literature number that is 44%. The scholarly attention is out of proportion with reality.

There is a sense in the media that men killed in Juarez deserve it because they must be involved in narco-business, which is why there is so much less coverage of the hyperviolence that predominantly affects men.

Molly described many of the more commonly heard fallacies:

●       Thousands of factory girls have been raped mutilated, etc.

  1. 3/4 of deaths are domestic violence and only 12 out of 427 cases show mutilations

●       Since hyper violence began, women killed in same way that men are
●       Most of the women’s murders are unsolved because they are not cared about,

  • In truth there is a lack of prosecution across the board

She closed by reiterating that all of the lives lost in Juarez matter, not just women. All people are victims. Focusing on the deaths of women distracts and prevents people from dealing with the widespread slaughter of men and women.

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan
Don Quixote in English: A Chronology: A Digital Humanities Project for the Classroom

Barbara talked about the development of an online interactive chronology of translations of Don Quixote into English. At the University of Michigan, there are themed semesters. One semester the theme was language and translation, and the libraries and departments put on events to highlight that theme.

Barbara wanted to highlight the collections and also digital humanities with her project, so she developed a digital chronology project of the various editions of Don Quixote in English. It covers 1612 to the present day. For each entry they created bibliographic information with book cover images (if that title was available in their own collection), and linked to all editions of that particular translation available in the catalog. After the first version of the project, students worked to redesign it and augment it for usefulness. More features were added and the layout and design were made friendlier. A comparison feature was added in, which allows users to compare the original to various translations or to compare one translation to another. A bibliography was included as well, with information on various translations.

Gains from the project included:

●       Students were so engaged with and excited about the project.
●       Gaining new insights into the history of Don Quixote translations
●       Learning about research methods in Digital Humanities
●       See Digital Humanities in action through the Hispanic Baroque and The Cervantes Project
●       Learning about web design and accessibility
●       Having a librarian embedded in the course

QUESTIONS
None

May 21, 2013, 4- 5:30 PM
Moderator: Alison Hicks (University of Colorado-Boulder)
Rapporteur: Ryan Lynch (University at Albany, State University of New York)

Presentations:

  • Artículos destacados: Using and Improving the Best of Wikipedia — Lisa Gardinier, University of Iowa
  • Tricking Internet Algorithms: La Energaia, Contemporary Indigenous Thought and Humanities Classrooms — Suzanne Schadl, University of New Mexico
  • Working with the Experts: Faculty and Student Contributions to Metadata for Cuban Theater Collections at the Cuban Heritage Collection – Matt Carruthers, University of Miami
  • Be a Web Search Maven: Shock Your Students, Enliven Your Instruction, and Teach Them a Lifelong Skill – Adrian Johnson, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Too Much Information” – Re-imagining the 1-shot Library Session with Active Learning Strategies – Gabriella Reznowski, Washington State University
  • Using Boards to Prevent Boredom: Active Learning in a Latin American Politics course – Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia

Hicks began by explaining that the session, now in its third year and formerly called “Pecha Kucha,” had been renamed. After a competition, the winning title was “Roda Viva,” suggested by Timothy Thompson (University of Miami). Hicks and Thompson explained that the title is a Brazilian Portuguese term to describe “incessant movement, hustle and bustle, a whirlwind of activity” as well as a talk show on Brazil’s public television station, TV Cultura. She also announced that there was a slight schedule change and Anne Barnhart (University of West Georgia) would be going first.

Using boards to prevent boredom: active learning in a Latin American Politics course / Anne Barnhart (University of West Georgia)

Barnhart explained that she was going to talk about an evolving lesson plan and assignment that she has tried in a few political science classes, but that it can easily be adapted to other courses/disciplines. She also said that she has tried this in credit-bearing courses, in double one-shots, etc.

She said that her favorite instructional technology is the whiteboard or, better, back-painted glass boards (as Sharpie comes off of glass). She also noted that students tend to prefer purple markers.

Barnhart noted that using whiteboards was effective with students because it got them out of their chairs, away from computers and phones, and made them accountable for helping each other out. She also noted that in order for the lesson plan to work, students need to have skeletal research projects.

For the lesson, the instructor distributes markers and each student writes his or her topic on the board and explains this in words, as a concept map, etc. Students then go around in a circle, making comments on others’ work, writing notes, circling parts that they like or are unclear, and generally doing a peer review. Barnhart notes that this is called a carrousel model. She added that the professor and librarian join the carrousel.

She then introduced a “who cares” prompt, which helps them think about whether or not their topic is appropriate for their audience, and also about where to look for resources. In other words, who cares enough to gather, organize, or disseminate certain types of information?

At the end of the session, students take photos of their section of whiteboard or copy their sections. This becomes the day’s notes.

Barnhart said that this is a session where the librarian is forced to let go of control (it is a classic flipped classroom). Instead of teaching students how to find resources, it teaches them how to approach research. She complements this with LibGuides, which they can use outside of the classroom. She also noted that the lesson requires a lot of collaboration. Professors must collaborate to require students to come up with research topics; students must collaborate with each other; and students must collaborate with the librarian because she requires them to be active agents.

Barnhart pointed out that this can be done with paper, post-it notes, etc.—it is a good session for rooms with no computers or resources.

In conclusion, she hopes that these sessions are aimed at getting students more engaged in research through active and kinetic learning.

Teresa Miguel–Stearns (Yale University) asked Barnhart how she helps students actually find resources and navigate the webpage if that is not happening in the classroom. Barnhart responded that she has never done this in one, 50-minute session, so she uses a second to introduce students to the library webpage or a LibGuide. She also suggested that in a 75-minute session, the librarian would have time at the end to do that or that the librarian could set up individual appointments.

Artículos destacados: Using and improving the best of Wikipedia / Lisa Gardinier (University of Iowa) Gardinier stated that she has done this lesson twice with undergraduate classes, both taught by the same professor. One was an upper-division Spanish course, while the second class was a more basic Spanish course.

For this assignment, students are required to do a group project in which they create and contribute to a wiki article. This is a private wiki created for the class. Students need to have passwords and their contributions are only visible to classmates. The assignment was developed for a specific assignment, but Gardinier stated that it could be used to teach about Wikipedia or adapted to other contexts.

Gardinier pointed out that the first dilemma that she and the professor confront is that they are creating a wiki, but students are told that Wikipedia is bad and they are not supposed to be using it. They therefore try to turn this into a “Wiki-positive class.” She does this by acknowledging that “they use it already, and there are some very pages.” Gardinier then explained feature articles/artículos destacados, which are articles that are developed according to certain criteria. She also demonstrated the Spanish criteria for an artículo destacado.

To prepare for the course, Gardinier takes the wiki topic, and identifies feature articles relevant to the class. She starts by creating a worksheet and beginning her discussion talking about who uses Wikipedia, and how/why/when they use it, and why they are told not to use it. Gardinier introduced the idea of Wikipedia as a “presearch tool.” They further discuss what their criteria are a good Wikipedia article (asking each student to list three characteristics) before introducing them to the criteria for feature articles and leading a discussion about what might surprise them (such as the style manual). Her idea is that a very good Wikipedia article is a good model.

Students are then asked to think about sources, and what makes a good source. For instance, Wikipedia articles cannot cite other Wikipedia articles. Further, this is an opportunity to look at different citation formats for different kinds of sources and discuss issues such as differences between journal articles and news articles. As an aside, she notes that this is a use for Wikipedia pages: the use of the bibliography and references.

She then talks to them about a weakness in Wikipedia, which is journal sources. She then introduces students to search tools (a federated search for the 5th-semester students, databases such as Academic Search Elite or JSTOR for advanced students) and has students find a couple of sources.

Finally, Gardinier said that in assessments using minute papers, students said that they did not know about the structure of Wikipedia, and that it was helpful to learn about it.

Tricking internet algorithms: La Energaia, contemporary indigenous thought and humanities classrooms / Suzanne Schadl (University of New Mexico)

Schadl addressed how to incorporate digital-born materials into digital humanities research, using as an example La Energaia. She stated that she is looking for help, support, advice, assistance, and other ideas for her class in the fall. She further stated that the purpose of the course module was to apply an understanding of trends and to execute methods in Latin American studies. She spoke to the idea that Latin American Studies historically provides a means for scholars who have historically felt marginalized in their disciplines to get together and exchange ideas with one another. She clarified that there are preceding lessons in the module, and that each lesson identifies important concepts, with the idea that this will help with better teaching. Examples of these concepts are that disciplines arise from necessity, that information can be marginalized, and that interdisciplinary work disrupts center-periphery identifications.

Other preceding lessons give an overview of trends in Latin American humanities disciplines; provide an examination of how the humanities generally incorporate comparative analysis and require interacting with source materials; look at how information comes from different places (including the internet) and access in different places is unequal/uneven.

Schadl then discussed La Energaia, a searchable database of born-digital materials on energy and energy policy, pulling from Twitter discussions, government documents, news sources, and institutional repository materials. This is done through a site that pushes information out through Twitter.

For the assignment, students will form five groups, identify a subject (like energy) and start to develop the places where born-digital materials are addressing this subject, with the objective of integrating these into an Energaia-like resource. Finally, groups will present a proposal for this project to a panel of professors, who will then make suggestions on how to better-integrate what they are doing into that field.

Related link: La Energaia

Be a Web Search Maven: Shock your students, enliven your instruction, and teach them a lifelong skill / Adrian Johnson (University of Texas, Austin)

Pointing out that the holy grail of information literacy instruction is getting students interested, which says is best addressed by lessons that are not just relevant to one research paper but instead to students’ daily lives. The one place that he has had success with this is in web searching skills, teaching students how to really effectively search. Johnson states that there are two keys to this: transferability (such as to databases or other parts of life) and the so what (thinking about what kind of information they want to find).

Johnson emphasized that it is extremely important to know what kinds of sources searchers are looking for, allowing them to narrow their searches. He then went through a number of advanced search techniques that are effective for students, including searching by a domain, country domain, specific websites, NOT and OR searches, the use of asterisks (to replace a word or phrase in a quote) and the tilde (synonyms), search for terms in the title of a web page or a URL, use of ellipses to search for numbers in a range, the use of these strategies in different Google products, and combining several or all of these strategies.

Finally, Johnson talked a little about how Google works, which he said is exciting to students because they use it so often, but have no idea how it works. Johnson then discussed how it is a database that uses cached snapshots of pages, additional information about given web pages, the idea of the “overblown algorithmic estimate,” the concepts of personalized searching and page ranking/popularity (including the popularity of pages that link to a page), and that the fact that to results are historical and that popular placement is hard to break away from.

Related Link: Johnson’s evidence that popularity is hard to break away from because it is historical (a page he made in library school).

Working with the Experts: Faculty and student contributions to metadata for Cuban theater collections at the Cuban Heritage Collection / Matt Carruthers (University of Miami)

Carruthers replaced Natalie Bauer (University of Miami) in the preliminary program.

Carruthers spoke of faculty, student, and research fellow contributions to metadata for the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) digital collections, which is a special collections repository at the University of Miami. The CHC focuses on primary and secondary materials from Cuba and the Cuban Diaspora. There are many active digitalization projects.

They are working with Lillian Manzor (University of Miami) to use digital humanities in teaching her graduate course on 20th century Latin American theatre to help students see the value in digital media. Professor Manzor and staff coordinated to create an assignment whereby students created metadata for objects related to their own research. This metadata would be added to digital repositories, along with images of the projects.

Carruthers discussed logistics of the projects, including challenges. As a metadata librarian, he introduced metadata creation to students in one class session, so he embedded himself in the class Blackboard page so that he could be in dialogue with students. Another question was which platform would be used for students to inter metadata; it was decided that the Cuban Digital Theater Archive would be easiest, as it already has a platform for entering metadata. Another problem was the lag time in the digitization queue.

Carruthers then outlined successful outcomes. For one, it allowed the “library to engage more broadly with faculty and students.” Students learned about how to structure data, and came to value both the digital humanities and metadata. Furthermore, the Cuban Heritage collection gains from subject expertise of graduate students, and CHC users also benefitted from better metadata. Finally, the project had low overhead and high value, so he encourages others to experiment with these kinds of projects.

Cuban Heritage Digital Collections

Cuban Digital Theater Archive

Too Much Information” – Re-imagining the 1-shot Library Session with Active Learning Strategies / Gabriella Reznowski (Washington State University)

Reznowski described a 10-20 minute 1-shot session, emphasizing the importance of teaching outside the box, rather than using lectures to teach skills. One problem she spoke about was reaching out to instructors and faculty, and figuring out their information literacy instruction needs. One major need is to help students understand the difference between scholarly and non-scholarly articles.

Her strategy was to gather classes to talk about scholarly articles. This can be used in small classes or groups of over students. She talks to them about some things that can be expected with scholarly articles, including authors’ names and credentials, they may have abstracts or credentials, and they may end with a bibliography or works cited list. They then count off into groups that congregate around a poster-sized piece white paper. Reznowski then distributes scholarly and non-scholarly articles, asking students to answer basic questions such as the title of the article, the periodical it was in, and how they would cite the article. If there is time, groups can rotate to the next group, check the answers of the other groups, and try to find articles using the citation and World Cat. This helps them learn but also serves as an assessment tool for faculty and librarians.

Questions:

Emma Marschall (Tulane University) asked Carruthers for an example of what kinds of materials students were describing and about whether or not the material was in English or Spanish. Carruthers said that some of the objects were sketches for theatre costume designs. He added that the metadata is not truly bilingual, and that while some descriptive information is in Spanish (the materials are in Spanish), but that the technical metadata is in English to be consistent with other collections.

Kelsey Corlett-Rivera (University of Maryland) explained that the University of Maryland also has some projects where students work on metadata and that they have used Google spreadsheets, and wondered if Carruthers had tried other possibilities. Carruthers said that they had considered a basic template, but that the platform already existed and would automatically save, so they thought it would be simplest to do it that way. On the other hand, a Google spreadsheet that they can all share and something that does not go directly go into the database could be useful. Corlett-Rivera asked what the back end for the Cuban Digital Theater Archive is, and Carruthers explained that it was Django, which is a PHP and Python framework.

Manzor asked Schadl how La Energaia is structured. Schadl explained that it is a database constructed in Drupal that plays with Drupal’s pathways to put everything in the same place, taking advantage of crawling. Schadl added that Twitter is harder, because it cannot be crawled so they have to go in and enter hashtags.

Deb Raftus (University of Washington) asked Johnson if he does standalone Google classes. Johnson responded that he does drop-in advanced Google searching in person, online, and recorded and also weaves it into all classes by relating database searching to Google. He stated that students of all levels love it.

Hicks asked Reznowski about feedback from faculty and students. Reznowski said that she was inspired to do this lesson by a failed session where she did not do what the faculty member wanted, and failed to get what was expected of students. In one case, he created a class LibGuides where a survey was embedded, but no one completed it; surveys need to be completed in the classroom. Finally, she has come to try to have students pick a topic that they are interested in and try to research that.

Hicks thanked everyone for attending. The session ended at 5:12 p.m.

 

Sunday, May 19, 4-5:30

Moderator:   Adan Griego, Stanford University

Rapporteur: Lisa Gardinier, University of Iowa & Michael Hoopes, University of New Mexico

Presentations:

  • E-libro.com, Felipe Varela
  • Digitalia, Lluis Claret
  • Librería García Cambeiro, Fernando Genovart
  • Casalini Libri, Kathryn Paoletti
  • Librarian Perspective, Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
  • Librarian Perspective, Angela Carreño, New York University

Griego (Stanford) introduces the panel by asking what has changed since the first inception of an e-book panel at SALALM in 2009 and noting that librarian concerns and vendor responses have been fruitful. He concludes by acknowledging current issues with the portability and compatibility of certain e-readers and the inter-operability of interlibrary loan systems; but states that regardless trends published by ACRL indicate that e-books are here to stay.

Despite the growth of digital formats from Latin American publishers, it appears that numbers are fairly low, with each country producing fewer than 5% of its publications in digital formats. Current studies on e-book usage in academic and public libraries are briefly discussed.

Individual presentations from e-book vendors are given by representatives of Casselini (Italy), Digitalia (Spain), E-Libro.com (Spain), and Libreria Garcia Cambeiro (Argentina/Brazil).  While each vendor’s product is distinct, all three vendors discuss similar topics that include the special formatting, search capabilities, compatibility with mobile devices and citation exporters, and purchasing for their specific products.

Angela Carreño (New York University) discusses her institution’s decision to adopt a publisher platform and e-book strategy. She touches on the needs of certain services within e-books such as note taking and searching that make for a comfortable scholarly research environment, stating that the development of user/research-friendly platforms is a process very much still in development.

Suzanne Schadl (University of New Mexico) discusses UNM libraries goals for e-book development (eventually holding 40% of their collections in ebook format to be accessed whenever and wherever patrons desire) and some current infrastructural obstacles. She notes that different users have different needs, and that while e-books stand to create space for studying and important physical items, they are not the only answer for academic research. Furthermore under-resolved infrastructural problems at UNM like poor wireless internet access in some parts of library buildings make to efficient ebook usage and promotion difficult. E-book displays also prevent obstacles for individuals seeking to read from their smartphones or tablets.

Questions:

Hortensia Calvo  (Tulane) asks Carreño whether e-books will be utilized in study abroad and international campus sites of American universities.  Angela states that special programs like the NYU branch campus in Abu Dhabi and increasing pressure on research libraries to collaborate in smarter ways of making e-books more useful for branch campuses.

Vera Araújo (Susan Bach Books, Brazil) laments that the only e-books in abundance in Brazil are self-published books, novels, etc. How is the situation in other Latin American countries? Are there many e-books from Peru, Colombia, or Uruguay? A vendor responds by stating that Brazil is somewhat behind, and there is currently little interest among Brazilian librarians with regards to e-books.

A discussion on free materials takes place, with one Argentine librarian discussing the financial constraints of his institution and the common practice of uploading/downloading PDF files for academic use, a practice that accomplishes the same role as the e-book. One digital publishing representative responds by first stating that the debate surrounding free materials is a difficult one, and that he is personally against the use of free content. Such content is also unstable, available online one day online and gone the next.  Another representative is supportive of official open access titles, stating that the problem with organizations that only provide open access titles struggle to provide certain titles. The third representative states that the commitment of an e-book purchase ensures that a title will be stable and readily available to library patrons.

Angela Kinney (Library of Congress) expresses an interest in title-by-title (non-bulk) purchases of e-books. This desire is spurred by a lack of space for physical books. Her library also desires to develop a model that obtains a publication in a package that includes the physical book, the marked record, and the digital item. Is it possible for e-book vendors to conform to this three-part package? The e-book representatives respond by stating that yes, such packages could be made possible.

 

Monday, June 18, 2012, 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Moderator: Suzanne Schadl (University of New Mexico)
Rapporteur: John B. Wright (Brigham Young University)
Panelists: Sean Knowlton (Columbia University), The Role of Comic Books and Graphic Novels in the Civic Formation of Cuban Youth” | Meiyolet Méndez (University of Miami), “Cuban Cartoons for Children: Pop Culture and Education on Screen”| Beverly Karno (Howard Karno Books), Sarah G. Wenzel (University of Chicago) and Wendy Pederson (University of New Mexico), “Purchasing, Selling and Processing Comic Strips and Graphic Novels” | Claire-Lise Bénaud and Suzanne Schadl (University of New Mexico), “Exhibiting Comics: From the Reading Room to Special Collections”

Sean Knowlton discussed the historical context of Cuban comic books and gave an analysis of current comics called historietas.  Cuban comic books have characters that promote a national identity and provided an arena to promote and/or lampoon political realities.  They did not use super heroes.  Knowlton discussed several Cuban comics: the physical quality of Elipidio Valdés, published by Editorial Pablo de la Torriente,  is getting less and less, especially the paper quality.  Yarí follows a young taino cubano living at time of Spanish conquest.  He fights against a cruel man. The message is that Yarí is our brother.  Yami follows the adventurs of a strong, independent woman of ideals who has strong values and works for the good of the community.  Historical comics are also popular.  These highlight heroes of Cuban history—José Martí, Fidel Castro—and promote solidarity with like-minded Latin American regimes in Venezuela and Bolivia—Martí and Bolívar (reminiscent of the relationship between Fidel and Hugo Chávez), Tupac Katari (links Quechua uprising with the efforts of Evo Morales).  These historical comics have a sense of legitimacy because they include bibliographies.  Graphic novels are somewhat limited in Cuba because of lack of supplies.

Meiyolet Méndez discussed how Cuban cartoons provide a forum for political discourse. They promote the values of the Cuban Revolution and serve as a vehicle to impart these values to Cuban children.  In September of 1960, illiteracy was viewed as a chief concern of the new, revolutionary Cuban government.  The Cuban National Literacy Campaign took place in 1960-61.  Hundreds of thousands of literacy teachers worked out in the country side.  The program was propagandistic.  It covered the history and values of the Revolution, in addition to helping people learn to read.  One benefit realized by the program was better understanding of the use of mass media.  Meiyolet described the creation of several government agencies that had responsibility for the media, both TV and Radio, from 1959-1976.  It was the policy that all programming on TV had to promote the ideals of the Revolution.  Early cartoons were geared toward adults and highlighted nature.  Some examples are El maná and Las manos.  Later, cartoons were more geared toward children and essentially took the comics from the page and put them on the screen.  Some examples are: Aventuras de Elipidio Valdés, Zunzún, El Capitán Plín, and Cecilia y Coti.  Before 1976, the content of cartoons was very force-fed.  After, the cartoons demonstrate a more subtle manipulation.  The media obscures the messages.
Beverly Karno described realities associated with graphic novels and comic books:  1) Independent distributors. The artist/writer usually self-published the comic books.  It is very difficult to find and acquire these materials and it involves making a connection with the artist/writer.  These are usually not a commercial venture.  Getting 1-2 issues is pretty common.  A title with 6-7 issues would be very successful.  It is hard as a book dealer because libraries start sending claim notices, but the book dealer doesn’t know where to find issue #3 or when it will be produced.  2) Non-traditional formats.  Some graphic novels and comic books start as print editions, but then change to a different format (DVD is common) and need special software to read it.  3)  Major challenges.  Pricing of graphic novels and comic books is great, very affordable, but it is very labor intensive to acquire these for customers.  The follow up is enormous!

Sarah G. Wenzel discussed acquisitions and collection development issues related to comic books.  The librarian must define the scope of the collection:  1) single story or single author;  2) literary or artistic value; 3) Are you going backwards as well as forward? 4) What has been published? 5) What do you ask the vendor to do?  

Wendy Pederson discussed cataloging and classification issues.  She demonstrated the difficulty of finding a piece by a particular comic book artist on the Internet, OCLC, etc.  If you log into the publisher website, you can find the title of the comic book fairly easy.  She also discussed difficulties in knowing how to catalog a comic book.  Does the illustrator get identified as the creator or would the creator be the writer of the text?  If a comic is an adaptation of a book, does it get classified with the creator of the original story or with the author of the adaptation?  AACR2 would place the adaptation with the author of the adaptation, but does the patron know this?  For subject analysis, what do we do?  It is common to use genre headings.  Karno, Wenzel and Pederson also distributed an annotated bibliography and instruction guide for purchasing, selling, and processing comic strips and graphic novels.
Suzanne Schadl and Claire-Lise Bénaud discussed the innovative use of rotating exhibits to build a bridge between users interested in the books displayed in the exhibit themselves and materials housed in the University of New Mexico libraries Special Collections.  In the fall of 2012, the rotating exhibit will be Mexican comics and caricatures.  In the presentation, Schadl discussed the unique aspects of virtual, physical and boutique spaces in the Library and how they relate specifically to the Library’s Reading Room.  Bénaud discussed the upcoming comic books and caricatures exhibit, giving us a look at some of the interesting aspects of this exhibit, including José Gadalupe Posada’s Don Chepito and the work of the Taller de Gráfica Popular which used its art to advance social causes.

Questions and Comments:
Pamela Graham (Columbia University): Is the way graphic novels get printed or published going to change? Will it be online or print?  Wendy responded that if the goal is to produce printed object, then the art work and the physicality are important.  Beverly Karno responded that the use of Twitter is important.  So is Flickr.  A large portion of graphic artists work is being put on Flickr.
Lisa Gardinier (University of Iowa): Web comics have exploded in the U.S. over the last 10 years.  Sarah Wenzel indicated that much of the web comics cannot be downloaded by the Library. Consequently, that format is not very helpful for developing a collection that can be preserved by the Library.

Cecilia Sercan (Cornell University): Do you include the URL in the bibliographic record for online comics?  Sarah Wenzel responded that online ephemera is being lost because we can’t do much to preserve it.  We do have some URLs available.  Suzanne Schadl indicated that unless the URL is stable, the patron would not be able to use it whether it is in the bibliographic record or not.

Paula Covington (Vanderbilt University): Paula commented that some literature cannot be digitized and put online because the publishing companies own the copyright of all or part of the work.  She gave the example of Jane Austen’s books.  The copyright for the illustrations included in these books is owned by Dell and consequently cannot be included in the digitized version.  Also mentioned was comiXology.com which has Spanish language comics, but they are largely translations of American comics.

SALALM LVI
Saturday, May 28, 2011 4:00 – 5:00pm

 

Present: Adan Griego; Suzanne Schadl; Lief Adleson; Anne Barnhart; Marisol Ramos; Sarah Aponte; Socrates Silva; Barbara Belejack (U of Arizona Lib School Stdt); Alma Ortega (Chair); Berlin Loa (U of Arizona Lib School Stdt); Mercedes Tinoco Espinoza (Enlacista); Graciela Barcala de Moyano (Enlacista); Peter Altekreuger.

1. Action: Everyone who is part of ALZAR will have a chance to vote on the proposed bylaws via e-mail at a later date

2. There have been a variety of issues with the Listserv set up at West Georgia University (WGU). The group decided to create a Yahoo! Groups listserv. Everyone currently on the Facebook group page will be invited by Alma to join the Yahoo! Group.
Action: Alma will create new listserv.
Action: Everyone currently on WGU listserv will be invited to join new list on Yahoo! Groups

3. Marisol Ramos (University of Connecticut) created a Hispano/Latino Resources Google Doc that she shared with the group via LALA-L a few weeks ago but got very little response with that initial announcement.

The goal is to have members of ALZAR fill it out so we can facilitate resource sharing as well as use it when we need to benchmark at our institutions. Anne suggested converting the Google Doc spreadsheet into a form to make it easier to use by those filling it out. The next time this document gets distributed on LALA-L and ALZAR Facebook’s page it will be as a Google Form.

Some felt that some of the questions asked were a bit sensitive when it came to asking for acquisitions spending amounts. On the new ALZAR site it will be possible to create a login so that sensitive information is not readily accessible. The list of resources, such as Libguides and online collections would still remain accessible freely to anyone cruising the ALZAR page.

Action: Marisol will convert the spreadsheet to a form
Action: Marisol will distribute the new form on the ALZAR Facebook page and on LALA-L

4. Newsletter. The group decided that changing the name from Alzar Corner to ALZAR Zone was a good idea. Alma will report this to Daisy Dominguez. There are six (6) issues and we need to be in almost all, if not all, the issues.
Action: Alma to report name change to Newsletter editor

5. Combo meeting. Given the variety of attendance at these meetings from very large to very small, ALZAR wishes to restructure its meetings. There was a general consensus that the ALZAR meeting try to be part business meeting and part presentation or demo of a timely software, resource or program beginning with the meeting held in 2012.
Action: Alma will plan for the next meeting to be half business meeting and half demo meeting

6. Future website. This summer Adán will be migrating the ALZAR page on the SALALM site to a Stanford University server. The new ALZAR site will be managed via Drupal. Suzanne, Marisol and Alma have already worked out what they want to be on the new site regarding the homepage, the mission, goals, etc. This file will be sent electronically to Adán by Suzanne so this work can be incorporated into the new Drupal site.
Action: Adán will migrate the page from the SALALM server
Action: Suzanne will send recommendations for website files to Adán

7. Announcement of new co-chair. Suzanne M. Schadl (University of New Mexico) will be the new co-chair of ALZAR with Alma. Suzannne will be the junior chair/apprentice for 2011-2012.
8. RCL-Latino Studies. Via an e-mail, Ana María Cobos (Saddleback College) announced that there was a need for a new editor/s to oversee the reviews in the RCL. Suzanne volunteered to do it.
Action: Alma will make sure Suzanne and Ana María get in touch during this SALALM meeting.

9. New Business.
Panel for 2012 conference. Marisol charged herself with the effort to organize an ALZAR sponsored panel for the next SALALM meeting. It is hoped that the 2012 theme (Popular Culture) will attract presenters. There were panels in 2008 in New Orleans and 2009 in Berlin, both of which were well attended, but there were not any for  2010 in Providence or 2011 in Philadelphia.
Action: Marisol will put out call for 2012 conference.