Currently viewing the tag: "Paula Covington"

Moderator:      Alison Hicks, University of Colorado, Boulder
Rapporteur:    Melissa Gasparotto, Rutgers University

Presenters
Paula Covington, Vanderbilt University
Latin American Digital Projects: Student, Faculty and Library Collaborations at Vanderbilt University

Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia
Because Learning Is Not Just for Students: Information Literacy for Faculty

Sarah Buck Kachaluba, Florida State University
Follow Up to “From Dub Assessment to Smart Assessment”: Adaptions for FSU Libraries

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
Tagging ASARO: A UNM Experiment in Crowd-Sourcing and Collection Development

Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York Libraries (CUNY)
Teach With Music

Molly E. Molloy, New Mexico State University
The Femicide Fallacy

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan
Don Quixote in English: A Chronology: A Digital Humanities Project for the Classroom

Paula presented on a Dean’s fellows program at Vanderbilt Libraries to pair advanced undergraduates and graduate students with a librarian mentor, usually to work on digitization projects (this can include metadata, digitizing, etc.). Many students end up using these digital collections when working on their dissertations, too.

She gave several examples of current fellows and their projects.

●       Helguera Collection of Colombiana
This Colombia-in-the-19th-century project includes descriptive thematic essays. The essays are done as a separate independent study. The collection includes broadsides, pamphlets and programas.
●       Oral histories from the Manuel Zapata Olivella Papers
Zapata Olivella was an Afro-Colombian novelist and anthropologist. The collection includes transcriptions of interviews with ancianos that students in colegios across Colombia interviewed. The hope is to add tapes at some point.
●       Ecclesiastical & Secular Sources for Slave Societies
This project digitally preserves Cuban, Colombian and Brazilian church and clerical documents relating to Africans and Afro-decedents. Among its uses is genealogy.

Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia
Because Learning Is Not Just for Students: Information Literacy for Faculty

Anne presented on teaching information literacy workshops for faculty at University of West Georgia. She noted that faculty may have tunnel vision, and can be hard to reach with librarians’ information literacy message. They’re pulled in several directions already, but are also envious that librarians have the opportunity to go to conferences where they learn to teach and about new research in pedagogy. Anne established a workshop series called “GoodLibrations: Because learning is not just for students,” in response to this need. She provided food and alcohol as an incentive to attend.

Some of the topics included: leveraging Google apps, information ethics, using Adobe Creative Suite, practices for teaching critical thinking, Endnote, a celebration of faculty research that was especially popular, and a promotion & tenure dossier workshop. The topics were chosen by questionnaire.

Anne also helped plan and organized the Innovations in pedagogy conference, to address lack of pedagogy instruction for faculty. To help learn about how to teach faculty, she attended POD.

Sarah Buck Kachaluba, Florida State University
Follow Up to “From Dumb Assessment to Smart Assessment”: Adaptions for FSU Libraries

Sarah attended the “From Dumb Assessment to Smart Assessment” session at SALALM and got a lot out of it. She incorporated a version of that workshop into the FSU Libraries public services retreat. She developed 3 power points (active learning, writing student learning outcomes and one on assessment) that were heavily cribbed from Alison Hicks, Anne Barnhart, Meghan Lacey & AJ Johnson. She also developed templates for writing student outcomes for different disciplines. A few liaisons who did a lot of instruction found it very useful.

There were, however, limitations: some folks in mid management were pulled away in the middle and they would have benefitted. Moreover, nly public services librarians were there so some liaisons missed out.

Sarah detailed the ways she’s incorporated these strategies into her own instruction:

●       She’s started handing out worksheets for students to work in pairs to brainstorm resources they could use to find primary and secondary sources, and posting these worksheets on a wall so others could provide feedback. This didn’t work very well, so now she’s developed pre and post-session assessment handouts.

  • The pre- asks students why their research topics are and to identify things they want to learn during the session.
  • The post- asks for 1-3 things students learned and 1 thing they want to learn in the next sessions

She has gotten positive feedback from this
●       Sarah has also developed and taught a 3-hour session, where she used the worksheet again. This gave her productive feedback to use as they searched. She asked students to send her one resource they found during the session but few followed through.

The assessment workshop skills she learned have also helped her in other ways: she recently was able to help a colleague who needed to write student learning outcomes for a conference panel proposal.

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
Tagging ASARO: A UNM Experiment in Crowd-Sourcing and Collection Development

Suzanne talked about her work on the exhibit, Tagging ASARO: UNM experiment in crowd-sourcing and collection development (done with Mike Graham de la Rosa among others) at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

Various people were involved in the design of the exhibit, including Americorps interns who brought their own stenciling art skills to the installation because of how inspired they were by ASARO’s work.

ASARO: Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca  is participatory and about “getting up” and getting the word out. They use varied formats and venues. The goal of the exhibit was to transform and reframe work of this collective for the in the spirit of their own work but in a different context. The exhibit alters the context and creates dialogue – making connections between Oaxaca and Albuquerque. Suzanne has been working with Archive-it to archive digital files uploaded to ASARO website

The crowdsourcing element of the exhibit involved asking visitors to “tag” items using notecards. This was designed to foster community engagement with library. This crowdsourcing wasn’t so much about outsourcing descriptions and metadata but rather a “getting up” community response in the archives. (There was an issue with word “tag” and it’s multiple meanings. So it was important to encourage people to tag but not bring spray paint!)

There are going to be 5 community forums around the exhibit. The first one was a poetry slam with Nolan Eskeets. The tags and performances from this event are now part of this collection as well.

In two months they’ve had many cards posted, but nothing from the online component has been tagged. There is one place where comments not being posted. -The cave. This is in a different media format, so perhaps visitors are less able to interact with it than something in a frame on a wall.

Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York Libraries (CUNY)
Teach With Music

Daisy observed that film is a preferred AV teaching tool in the classroom. She sent out a survey for Latin American Studies faculty on use of AV in LAS teaching. One professor suggested making a database, which she did using Omeka and it’s called Teach with Music. Currently it is hosted on her personal website: daisilla.org/omeka

The database includes titles of songs along with subjects, tags, a description, and how it can be used in education, all of which is contributed from LAS faculty. She demonstrated the usefulness of the database by playing some clips. One song about Oscar Romero has been used to talk about the church in a positive way via church activism. Another song, Zumbi by Jorge Ben, was suggested by a professor because it can be used to talk about plantation work by maroons, and the complexity of slave experience.

There are plans to connect this database to other databases like HAPI to help give thematic context to the themes explored in the songs.

Molly E. Molloy, New Mexico State University
The Femicide Fallacy

Molly presented about the news coverage about Juarez that has been dominated by femicide. She described the sensationalized coverage of sexualized murders of women in Juarez, arguing that this is not representative of the facts, and distracts from the problems facing the city. The picture is much more complicated that presented in the media because women are killed for a variety of reasons that may not have to do with their gender. She documented the various movies, books and pop culture references to the murders of women in Juarez, noting that much of the “information” available is speculation and not founded by reputable sources. The main book responsible for this perception is Cosecha de Mujeres, which brought the issue to public recognition, but the book is very poorly sourced.

Actual numbers reveal that a small percentage of homicides are women (9% of victims on average over 24 years). By comparison, in US that percentage is 22%. The Philadelphia Inquirer did an interactive database with charts of murders by gender, comparing Juarez and Philadelphia (because Philadelphia is similar in population). Juarez numbers are much higher for most years. However at the peak of hyper violence beginning in 2008, the rate really spikes incredibly. Women’s rates go up in tandem with men’s, however, not nearly as much. But both are higher than rates of murder in Philly. The murder rate spiked in 2008-2011, but is now on steep decline. In news articles searching, 9.2% of articles about Juarez are about femicide but in academic literature number that is 44%. The scholarly attention is out of proportion with reality.

There is a sense in the media that men killed in Juarez deserve it because they must be involved in narco-business, which is why there is so much less coverage of the hyperviolence that predominantly affects men.

Molly described many of the more commonly heard fallacies:

●       Thousands of factory girls have been raped mutilated, etc.

  1. 3/4 of deaths are domestic violence and only 12 out of 427 cases show mutilations

●       Since hyper violence began, women killed in same way that men are
●       Most of the women’s murders are unsolved because they are not cared about,

  • In truth there is a lack of prosecution across the board

She closed by reiterating that all of the lives lost in Juarez matter, not just women. All people are victims. Focusing on the deaths of women distracts and prevents people from dealing with the widespread slaughter of men and women.

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan
Don Quixote in English: A Chronology: A Digital Humanities Project for the Classroom

Barbara talked about the development of an online interactive chronology of translations of Don Quixote into English. At the University of Michigan, there are themed semesters. One semester the theme was language and translation, and the libraries and departments put on events to highlight that theme.

Barbara wanted to highlight the collections and also digital humanities with her project, so she developed a digital chronology project of the various editions of Don Quixote in English. It covers 1612 to the present day. For each entry they created bibliographic information with book cover images (if that title was available in their own collection), and linked to all editions of that particular translation available in the catalog. After the first version of the project, students worked to redesign it and augment it for usefulness. More features were added and the layout and design were made friendlier. A comparison feature was added in, which allows users to compare the original to various translations or to compare one translation to another. A bibliography was included as well, with information on various translations.

Gains from the project included:

●       Students were so engaged with and excited about the project.
●       Gaining new insights into the history of Don Quixote translations
●       Learning about research methods in Digital Humanities
●       See Digital Humanities in action through the Hispanic Baroque and The Cervantes Project
●       Learning about web design and accessibility
●       Having a librarian embedded in the course

QUESTIONS
None

Finance Committee Meetings, May 18, 2013, 9-11a.m., Prado Room and May 21 (4-6, Segovia A), Hotel Westin, Coral Gables, FL

Submitted by: Paula Covington, Chair

Members present: David Block, Hortensia Calvo, Angela Carreño, Paula Covington, Melissa Guy, Peter Johnson, Martha Mantilla, Michelle McClure Elneil, Alma Ortega, Richard Phillips, Barbara Tenenbaum.

Others: Roberto Delgadillo, Mei Méndez, Orchid Mazurkiewicz, Gayle Williams, John Wright

Finance met twice in Coral Gables to review the current and proposed budgets, conference budgets, the state of investments, new initiatives, and the overall state of SALALM’s finances.

Treasurer Peter Johnson addressed financial reporting and other administrative issues. He reported a $64,000 balance on September 1. Expenses were steady and all predictable.  The decision has been made to keep the current fiscal year of Sept. 1-August 31. The endowment balance is $843,000; last year it was $724,000.  The Investment Working Group recommended moving assets to TIAA/CREF for their fund management (5% cash, 45/50 bonds vs equities from Vanguard, Fidelity and Franklin).   The recommendation passed.

Executive Director Hortensia Calvo reported on:

Membership: 222 personal, 91 institutional and a total of 313. 22 are sponsoring members.  She attributes these figures to institutional confidence and to the revitalization of publications.  The interim financial report (9/1/12-4/30/13 indicates a healthy balance and details will be posted on the website.

Conference budgets:

  • The Trinidad conference reported a net $5,660.25. Preconference income net  $23,032.55 as of 5/16/13 though all expenses not yet reported.
  • Miami conference expenses $14,000 for technology (includes 9% sales tax); includes 3 workshops and Skype fees; $5,000 for meeting rooms.  Income $23,032.55 and $32,590.85 expenses=$9558.30 deficit.
  • Salt Lake City 2014 proposed budget submitted by John Wright.  Hotel $129 single/double-free meeting rooms, 3 free guest rooms if 80% of 75 rooms booked; every 40 room nights=1 free room night. He anticipates a break-even budget.

Secretariat Budget (proposed; interim):  $64,118.93 initial request.

Scholarships-SALALM Travel AWARD:  Peter Johnson discussed the need to increase the current allotment of 4 scholarships to 5 due to the high quality of the applicant pool.  He proposed that 2 of the scholarship awardees attend a conference and present a paper similar to ENLACE and pay up to $1000 for each for travel expenses to be paid from general operating budget.   Awardee(s) could be currently enrolled in graduate school of library and information science or recently graduated and are only eligible if no full-time professional employment.  The paper(s) are to be selected by the president of that conference. Question as to whether the funds would have to come from the endowment funds since it represents ad $7000 annual commitment.  Richard commented that the scholarship is for investing in the future of SALALM and Peter commented that we need to “replicate ourselves.” It was unanimously approved and will be presented to the Executive Board.

Conference Management and deficits: it was determined that an advance budget must be submitted to the Chair of Finance and the Executive Director prior to signing with the hotel and a well-developed budget must be submitted by December.  Pre- or post-conference workshops should not be held during the conference and should be self-financing and not paid for through the conference.  Roberto Delgadillo suggested presidential waivers of registration fees should be limited to 5 at the most.  These recommendations should be added to the conference guidelines.

Membership Fees Committee recommendations were presented by Peter.  There will be a cut-off for payment of annual fees the end of October and a late processing fee of $10.

Mentorship program was discussed.  Program would serve student members scholarship awardees, and new professional members or others who might benefit. Mentors would be volunteers. No financial commitment involved.

 

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 8:30-10:00 a.m.

Moderator:  Paula Covington, Vanderbilt University

Rapporteur: John Wright, Brigham Young University

Presentations

  • Making Book Fairs Friendlier through Technology — Jesus Alonso-Regalado, State University of New York, Albany
  • Acquiring the Unique and Unusual in Latin America and the Caribbean – Teresa Chapa, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • A First Buying Trip: Searching for Treasure in Trinidad — Adrian Johnson, University of Texas, Austin
  • Beyond the Book Trade: Establishing Relationships with Institutions and Scholars — David Block, University of Texas, Austin

Convington began the session sharing some results of her informal survey of SALALM members and their practices of making book-buying trips:  50+% attend one book fair per year, 30% attend 1-4 trips per year, one person reported that s/he attended 11 book fairs in 2012.  Some reasons librarians took no trips were lack of funding and time constraints.  Benefits of making book-buying trips include creating familiarity with the book market in that country/place, developing relationships with vendors, etc.  Some respondents of the survey indicated that they obtain funding to make such trips from their respective libraries through endowments and centers for Latin American studies.  Book-buying trips are important ways to acquire older items (retrospective collection development) and to discover what’s new.  One respondent to Covington’s informal survey indicated that it is critical to be in Latin America as often as possible if you are to be a bibliographer for Latin American materials.

Alonso-Regalado discussed how technology has always preceded book buying.  In his presentation he discussed how technological friendliness at Latin American book fairs (he says, “Not so much.”)  He also shared how he uses technology at book fairs.  Only Bogotá and Buenos Aires are prepared for mobile technologies.  You don’t need an app.  But other books fairs have apps.  Using apps appears to be more trendy.  Cuba, Santo Domingo, Bienal in Brazil, Liber (Spain)—sometimes they use a different Facebook page for each year.  Others fairs keep a continuous dialog going.  The recommendation is to have one account and use twitter with #[year] for each fair.  Wireless is not very good.  Without it, you can’t access any of this.  It is like building a house by constructing the roof first.  It doesn’t make sense.  At Guadalajara book fair, some vendors have great wifi.  One can ask them to use their passwords or go outside the fair into the city where free wifi exists, in food court areas, etc.  E-books have special places.  Corner digital, one book fair is all e-books.  Most important app is from Germany.  You want an app that allows you to open spreadsheet, Docs to Go, connect this to DropBox, generate a list (html) for each country and connect to my library.  He carries a list of books wanted by students, and has exchange rates handy.  He notes the importance of keeping students and faculty involved in trips through Facebook pictures so they see the books before they are processed; and they can request rapid processing.  Alonso-Regalado establishes a strong emotional connection with faculty and highlights the books he feels are most important.  He shares on Facebook and sends spreadsheets via email.  “Las farias del libro” Cerlac, open access book 2012:  http://www.cerlalc.org/files/tabinterno/2f0015_Ferias_Digital.pdf

Chapa views book-buying trips as a way to get access to small press items and handmade books from collectives or individual artists.  It also is a good way to get titles with poor or no distribution, such as indigenous literature.  She notes that she collects unique and unusual things in order to document 21st-century Latin American popular, literary, social and political culture.  She is drawn to items aesthetically and she works to acquire materials that support curricular and research needs of students and faculty. Chapa notes some things to consider before collecting on book-buying trips:  How will you get the materials back to your institution?  Where will they be housed in your institution?  Will the curator/librarian accept the materials?  What are the added costs of acquiring these materials—preservation/conservation concerns, cataloging?  Who will fund this purchase?  Does the material fit into the curriculum?  What kind of publicity and outreach can be generated to promote use?  Chapa purchased a portable Mayan altar that needed quite an elaborate box.  Where to start?  Go to independent and specialized bookstores (like El conejo blanco in Mexico City).  Go to galleries and cafes, museums and cultural institutions, street fairs, in-country vendor assistance, specialized book art dealers, book artists and bookmaking collectives can be found via websites, Facebook pages, personal contacts.

Johnson discussed his first book-buying trip to Trinidad, sharing the upsides and downsides of the experience.   He noted that he got administrative support for the trip by tagging it onto a conference. Then he assessed the collection to identify gaps. The following are his upside and downsides:

Upside—I saw the Benson’s collection of Trinidadian music before the trip.  Downside—with 150 colleagues in the same place doing the same thing, I didn’t realize how picked over the resources would be.  Upside—Unique places.  I looked for unique places before and was prepared.  Downside—Some of these unique places were closed or didn’t have anything.  Upside—Some of these unique places came through.  I found back issues of the Carnival Magazine.  Downside—Carrying around a bag’s worth of materials all day and week.  Plan ahead to deal with the materials you buy.  Upside—Coffee shops with wireless were very beneficial.  Upside—Connections/friends who were always willing to help.  Downside—I could have bought many things from our libreros.  Upside—Having a camera to use while searching.  Downside—Didn’t take enough pictures to document work trip.  Upside—meeting new, fun, interesting and crazy people along the way.

Block indicated that we are fantastic travelers.  We should know where our faculty are going, what they are doing pre- and post-research.  We are lucky to have the great libreros in SALALM who do such great work for us.  Why should we travel?  1) Some materials are best in situ.   Feature films and musical performances are examples.  Others include cheat maps, street literature, publications from political parties, 2) Insinuating ourselves in cultural institutions and scholars, and 3) Navigating cultural patrimony.   He tries to evaluate the scholarly interest and object location.  David warned that when we return home we need to be careful when filling out the immigration reentry forms.  Be careful how you indicate what you are bringing in or out of a country.  Librarians may be facing documentary repatriation in the future.

QUESTIONS:

Peter Bushnell (University of Florida)—Do sound recordings at the University of Texas, Austin go into the Benson Institute or the Fine Arts Library?  Johnson has spoken with the Fine Arts Library.  Patrons will be able to go into the catalog to identify items, but then will be able to pick up their desired materials at either the Benson or the Fine Arts Library.

Adán Griego (Stanford University)—Teresa mentioned independent publications—connection between group PDF catalog is existent.  Excursions and interesting—went to see Cartonera, Billega & Felicidad.  Teresa—it was gone the next year.

Mark Grover (Brigham Young University)—Young colleagues have interest in our collections by country, but our collections are not connected by 2nd order of interest—we have to select areas/disciplines within the country.  For example, German immigration in Santa Catarina, Brazil, family histories, regional histories.  These types of materials are in large measure not available in the United States.

Elmelinda Lara (University of the West Indies)—I support Mark’s collection for Trinidad.  Get information on LPs, get music.  Social commentary is on the cover.  Christmas music/Param is important for Trinidad collection.  AV materials for humorous recordings.  Print materials.  Labor movements are another big place.  Personal contacts with them.  They may deliver them themselves.

Jennifer Osorio (University of California, Los Angeles)—What about when you get back?  Understaffed departments.o

Covington responded that you should work more with your Spanish/Portuguese catalogers to help set priorities.  Johnson told about featuring the cataloger on Facebook as part of the whole process.  Alonso-Regalado indicated that he buys some gifts or sweets for the Technical Services staff.  Covington added that she creates lists and gives comments to the cataloger.  Chapa said to engage the staff with the newly acquired items.  Let them watch the videos, etc.  Be good to acquisitions people.

Phil MacLeod (Emory University)—I recently brought back 100-200 books.  I got a sense from the folks in acquisitions about how best to process this.  Without them the library administration would stop this [my book-buying trips] process.  Covington responded that technical services staff are involved in SALALM, and they are involved at Vanderbilt.  Adán Griego indicated that giving context to what we are receiving helps technical services colleagues. Griego always expresses gratitude for what they do with the materials he brings home.  Johnson responded that he thinks it is important to help Library Administration realize that by going on the trips he is acquiring something unique versus another copy of Tom Sawyer.

Gayle Williams (Florida International University)—Over the last ten years, I have found that preparation is important.  I print out and put in a spiral bound notebook.  Collection development becomes the orphan of our position because we are so stretched in other directions.  By being prepared, we are able to “focus’ our efforts.  Serendipity is important as well.  You stumble into things.  Spread the net wide.  Our SALALM book dealers are a great resource when I am on the ground, but I think they may get the wrong idea.  Some may ask, “Why not let them do all the work.”  It is important for the bibliographer to be on the ground as well.  We need to make sure we educate the SALALM book dealers as well so that they understand that going on book buying trips is important for us librarians.

Wendy Griffin—California linguists who help to write and create alphabets are a good place to find indigenous things.  Get in touch with local librarians and archivists.  They know who the scholars are.  They are not buying or acquiring books, but they will know who the people are.

Teresa Chapa—At UNC—Chapel Hill we are allowed to have our faculty who are abroad buy materials that they want.  They are reimbursed by the library when they return.

Phil MacLeod (Emory University)—How do you help a 20th-century librarian get into the 21st century?  Alonso-Regalado responded that anyone can do this.  Technology has always been with us, it is just a different form of technology that we are using now.

Adán Griego (Standford Univeristy)—I walk around with a cuaderno. Jesús Alonso-Regalado (SUNY-Albany)—Another tip—do small cooperative decisions on the fly.  Look for hot items, share information with colleagues.  That we can have 2 or 3 copies of an item in different regions of the United States.

Margarita Vannini (Instituto de la Historia de Nicaragua)—Patrimonio Cultural—I have an opposite perception.  Our countries are well preserved in the libraries of the United States  and Germany.  Perhaps you could return things to us that only exist in your libraries.  We can cooperate and share.  We recognize that many things are spread around the world.  Can we collaborate to digitize things that will help us to complete our history?

Debra McKern (Library of Congress)-What are you doing with your images of tagging [street art, graffiti]?  Block responded that LC is doing things and Princeton is doing things.  He will follow their lead.  There has been a proposal made at LARRP.  LC has BPG and DLOC already doing that.  Covington encouraged all who travel to put written reports of our trip up on the SALALM website.

 

Panel 7, June 17, 2012, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Moderator: Stephanie Miles (Inter-American Development Bank)
Presenters: Diana Patricia Restrepo Torres (Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango del Banco de la República, Colombia); Paula Covington (Vanderbilt University); Judith Toppin (The University of the West Indies, Barbados)
Rapporteur: Virginia García (Instituto de Estudios Peruanos)

“Expresiones de la Cultura Popular Colombiana en el Archivo Sutatenza,” presentación de Diana Patricia Restrepo Torres

Descripción de un programa de educación rural para la población indígena de la localidad de Sutatenza, a través del Radio Sutatenza, para motivar a la población indígena a desarrollar actividades que los lleven a una participación social con el fin de alcanzar un desarrollo sostenible en educación, bienestar social, etc.

Con este propósito, se implementaron diversos programas de participación comunitaria, con participación de la iglesia católica. Todo el material documental obtenido se donó a la Biblioteca del Banco de la República, con el objeto de preservarlo y como fuente de los procesos sociales y culturales del campesinado colombiano. A finales del presente año, la Biblioteca Luis Angel Arango y del Banco de la República pondrá este archivo al servicio público.

“Afro-Caribbean Voices: Oral History Projects at Vanderbilt,” presentación de Paula Covington

La Universidad de Vanderbilt posee tres colecciones digitales sobre historia oral, una dedicada a la identidad racial, sobretodo en los Estados Unidos, la segunda que incluye muchas entrevistas de contenido afro-caribeño, y la tercera es la experiencia de los afro-colombianos. La primera colección contiene entrevistas del poeta Robert Penn Warren, con participaciones en movimientos sociales en los Estados Unidos, entre 1950 y 1960. La segunda colección digital trata principalmente sobre las descendencias de los panameños de las Antillas. La tercera colección digital corresponde a la colección personal de Manuel Zapata Olivella, destacado escritor y antropólogo afrocolombiano.

 

“Who Do You Think You Are? Strengthening Cultural Awareness and Identity Through Genealogical Research: The Role of Non-Traditional Resources,” presentación de Judith Toppin

Descripción de la identidad cultural de la población en Barbados, esta característica esta descrita a través de intensas investigaciones genealógicas. Barbados fue colonia inglesa hasta que en 1966 logra su independencia, convirtiéndose en un estado independiente.

 

June 19, 2012, 2:00 pm-3:00 pm
Facilitator: Lynn Shirey, Harvard University
Rapporteur: David Block, The University of Texas at Austin
Incoming officers: Stephanie Rocío Miles of the Nominating Committee announced the results of the 2012 elections:

  • Vice President/President Elect: Roberto C. Delgadillo

  • Members-at-Large: Paloma Celis Carbajal and Daisy V. Domínguez

Remembering Alan Moss: Gayle Williams reminded us of our recently deceased friend and colleague, Alan Moss. The Secretariat will make a donation in his memory, see below.

Treasurer’s Report: Peter Johnson highlighted several issues:

  • SALALM endowment (1993- ) the endowment, managed by the Investment Working Group, is intended to support SALALM’s activities as the organization faces an uncertain future. The endowment currently holds investments valued at $736,000 and has an annual payout, which has normally been reinvested, of $20,000 per year;

  • SALALM scholarship (2012- ) This scholarship, funded by donations earmarked for it and from the SALALM budget, awarded 3 grants of $1,000 each this year. The recipients are students involved in an information-oriented curriculum at any ALA-accredited institution who have expressed interest in a career that involves Latin America. Johnson announced that our advertisement was well received, producing 25-30 applicants, and that several runners-up received encouragement from the selection committee in the form of a complimentary SALALM membership for the coming year;

  • Johnson concluded by thanking the members of the scholarship task force and the SALALM Executive Secretary and her assistant, Carol Avila, for their advice and assistance over the year.

Executive Secretary’s Report: Hortensia Calvo reported:

  • At his family’s request, SALALM will make a donation to the Barbados Cancer Society in the name of Alan Moss

  • Memberships stand currently at 204 personal members, 101 institutional members (23 of whom are sponsoring members), and 13 student membership

President’s Report: Lynn Shirey reviewed conference issues:

  • By popular demand, SALALM LVII was a four-day meeting; Shirey announced that a follow-up survey soliciting observations on the conference will be distributed soon. At this point, she opened the floor for members to comment on the conference;

  • Speakers supported both the four day (on the basis of economics and member commitments) and five day (citing the difficulties in conducting necessary business on a reduced schedule).

  • Meeting with book dealers – some libreros expressed frustration with their inability to capture adequate attention from SALALM librarians. As with past meetings, the difficulties of scheduling and conflicts with panels reduced the time available for conversations and the lack of private space deterred some from raising necessary issues. Several possible remedies surfaced in the discussion—setting aside a period with no activities other than bookseller time, staggering activities to open spaces with the meeting among them.

    • All agreed that while there is no single solution to this issue, paying attention to scheduling and reducing competition for librarians’ attention is something that future schedulers should consider.

The meeting closed with Paula Covington’s appeal to members to share their memories of Howard Karno for a memorial that she has been asked to post on the SALALM website.

Panel 1, May 30, 2011, 11:00 am-12:55 pm

Moderator: Paloma Celis Carbajal, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Presenters: Gregory Berger, Grigoyo Productions; Shamina de Gonzaga, What moves you?; Carlos Gutiérrez, Cinema Tropical; Alexandra Halkin, Chiapas Media Project; Christopher Moore, Sol Productions
Rapporteur: Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York

Paloma Celis Carbajal began by noting that she met several of the panelists at LASA and suggested they come to SALALM to promote their material to libraries and that she was very pleased they accepted her invitation to participate on this panel. Carbajal noted that Gregory Berger of Grigoyo Productions could not attend.

Christopher Moore, Director of Sol Productions, began his talk, “Film as Source Material and Teaching Tool: Sol Productions and Moving Pictures o Los Autos de Caracas,” by saying that his goal on the panel was twofold. First, he wanted to consider theoretical approaches to memory in the documentary film genre and second, to find ways to work with librarians to preserve and provide access to these films. He co-founded Sol Productions in 2006 with the idea that the company’s films would not be the final word but would provoke more discussion about different topics. In 2007, Sol Productions produced three documentary films (in Venezuela, Senegal and France). Since their company did not have a public relations firm working with them, they traveled to over 90 schools to promote their films, but Moore notes that would not be possible this year due to the economic situation. Moore said he was excited to be at the conference in order to get ideas about how to promote their films even in difficult economic times and how to make them available in libraries throughout the world. Adding material online is one way around this but he wondered about the financial viability of it. Moore said that film is a very serious analytic tool as both a compliment to written works but also in its own right. Moore ended by showing the trailer for the Hugo Chavez documentary, “Puedo Hablar May I speak?”

Next, Alexandra Halkin, founding director of Chiapas Media Project and the Americas Media Initiative, presented “Collaborative Documentation and Advocacy.” They have been working with the Zapatistas since 1998. Due to the militarization of Chiapas, the last Zapatista video was produced in 2006. The war on drugs has filtered throughout southern Mexico and has affected their ability to produce for external distribution, though not for internal distribution. A lot of their archival material is being lost (covered in fungus in many cases) due to lack of climate control and the fact that a lot of material is still videotaped. While Halkin and her colleagues know what is needed to preserve this film, there is no funding for it and the situation has not changed. There are copies of the films in Mexico and the United States. Distribution to universities in the U.S. is critical and has sustained their work but due to the economic downturn, it has become difficult to obtain funding for travel and honoraria. The Cuban media project does not have distribution outside of Cuba and there are problems with the English subtitles in these Cuban documentaries. The work of TV Serrana, which was founded by UNESCO in 1993 and has 490 documentaries, is of excellent quality and subject matter. With funding from the Ford Foundation, they were able to add English subtitles to 20 of their documentaries. Librarians’ work is very important.  Money from the sale of videos goes back to Chiapas and Cuban communities. Halkin noted that they have tried to develop a symbiotic relationship between universities and marginalized filmmakers in Mexico and Cuba and this allows them to produce more films. Halkin ended by showing a trailer from the TV Serrana Tour.

Carlos Gutiérrez of Cinema Tropical began his presentation, entitled “New Partnerships in Latin American Outreach Through Film: The Cinema Tropical Case,” by noting that Cinema Tropical is a New York City based media arts organization which promotes Latin American cinema in the United States through regional programming. Noting that the economic crisis affecting the film world is affecting all of us, Cinema Tropical is interested in collaboration with the academic library world.

Gutiérrez then moved on to describe the recent explosion of independently produced film in countries like Argentina. In the mid-1990s, Argentina produced a new generation of filmmakers that produced feature and documentary films without government funding as had been done in the past. Then this explosion of film moved to Uruguay, which hadn’t produced a film in years, and more recently, Central America. However, it is difficult to get access to material from Central America.

When Gutiérrez moved to New York from Mexico City in 1997, there was not much Latin American cinema on American screens. The so-called “Three Amigos” brought attention to what was happening in Latin American cinema. Cinema Tropical began by having weekly screenings over the course of one year which led to interest by other theaters. So, they created a network in NYC and then in the country and have screened thirteen films across the U.S.,  which has become part of their circuit of films. They then started doing theatrical releases, which are the main aspect of releases which guarantee reviews. The now defunct LAVA (Latin American Video Archives) was a key organization in bringing videosl from Latin America over to the U.S. and Cinema Tropical has not really found new ways of doing this.

A major issue is that there is very little knowledge on how to contextualize Latin American film and therefore, to have critical debates. He mentioned, for example, that the New York Times reviewer of “Amores Perros”directed by González Iñáritu loved the film but thought that there had not been any art house films from Mexico since Buñuel. He noted that this is one way that universities can do outreach. Cinema Tropical partnered with the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU and combined screenings with discussion. Cinema Tropical also took screenings to the Arab world and more recently has partnered with the organization called What moves you? They recently started selling DVDs to universities. Cinema Tropical also created a list of the best ten Latin American films (which also mentions 130 films) of the past decade which led to a publication. Cinema Tropical will also publish a book on Lucrecia Martel, the director of “La Ciénaga,” who Gutiérrez recommends highly. He ended by promoting the screening of “Nostalgia por la Luz” (which screened the next day at the conference).

Shamina de Gonzaga’s presentation was entitled “Film as a Springboard for Dialogue on Immigration and Related Issues.” De Gonzaga started by noting the collaboration between Cinema Tropical (which served as the film distributor), NYU (which served as the academic hub), and her organization, What moves you? (which produces awareness campaigns) on the Indocumentales film series, which seeks to show the subtleties surrounding the issue of immigration. These events are also a way to disseminate resource packets and educational materials so that the film is “not accepted as gospel” but extends the conversation. De Gonzaga noted that it is not the same to see a five minute news report about a tragic incident as watching a 90 minute in-depth documentary. She gave an overview of the five films that were screened. The first film is “Al Otro Lado” which deals with drug trafficking and the popular musical genre known as narcocorridos. Another film is “Farmingville” which follows the aftermath of the killing of day laborers. De Gonzaga noted that the strong reaction among audience members to this film in particular validates the importance of having these screenings. “Los Que Se Quedan” deals with the impact of immigration on those who stay behind. “The Sixth Section” is a short which deals with people in upstate New York which sends money back to Mexico to build a baseball stadium. “Which Way Home” deals with mostly very young Central American children who attempt to come to the U.S. by freight trains and many times do not make it. “Mi Vida Adentro” is about an undocumented woman who is accused of killing a child in her care. De Gonzaga notes that during the screenings they may have lawyers who are more qualified to answer certain questions as well as community members because it is important not to be in silos. De Gonzaga ended by showing a clip of “Al Otro Lado,” which screened later that afternoon.

Questions and Comments:

Paloma Celis Carbajal commented on films as a catalyst to dialogue so that people will be receptive to certain issues. The Indocumentales series went to Wisconsin and it was tied to an exhibit on 200 years of immigration between US and Mexico. Celis Carbajal thought of this topic because she wanted something that was of interest not just to Mexicans.  This was the first time she got e-mails from the community requesting material from the exhibit, not just from faculty and students. So, this springboard from the film series worked.

Jesus Alonso-Regalado (SUNY Albany) asked whether the distributors were considering selling streaming videos. Gutiérrez said that this was not available yet but acknowledged that this is the trend. Moore said that “Democracy in Dakar” is sold digitally via iTunes but there is no distinction between individual and institutional purchases. They are behind on the process but open to it.

Daisy Domínguez (City College of New York) asked whether any collaborations had come about as a result of the dialogues at the screenings. De Gonzaga said that the resource packet helped and that it happens all the time. Halkin noted that a number of U.S. students have come down as interns to Chiapas and later, professional relationships have developed. Professors have toured TV Serrana and Halkin will be taking some of them to a national film festival in Cuba. She notes that the screenings open up the possibility for collaborations on different levels. Even individual communications like e-mails are a stepping stone toward bigger things. Moore noted that some students who are not at film schools have been motivated to pursue filmmaking and have even gone on to having their films screened at places like the Tribeca Film Festival.

Paula Covington (Vanderbilt University) asked whether Halkin had a sense of the scope of the archive and the cost of preservation of the Chiapas Media Project. Halkin said that the tapes are dispersed but that there were about 1,000 hours worth of recordings, including raw footage, on mini DV cassette and some on super VHS.

Martha Mantilla (University of Pittsburgh) asked whether there were any packages for institutions who want to invite these organizations to do presentations at universities. Gutiérrez noted that Cinema Tropical acts as intermediaries between libraries and filmmakers and mentioned packages like “Latin American Left” and “Music and Film Series.” He highlighted Brazilian filmmakers who have made a lot of films on many singers which also delve into issues of race, politics, and class but which are not distributed in the U.S.

p>Panel 20, June 1, 2011, 11:00 am-12:30 pm
Moderator: Paula Covington, Vanderbilt University
Presenters: Barbara Tenenbaum, Library of Congress; Amy Puryear, Library of Congress; Donna Canevari de Paredes, University of Saskatchewan; Paul Losch, University of Florida
Rapporteur: Peter S. Bushnell, University of Florida

 

Barbara Tenenbaum‘s presentation “Putting the Mexican Revolution Online: The Library of Congress Experience” centered on a new website at the Library of Congress devoted to the Mexican Revolution. Not content with the official dates of 1910 to 1917, the site includes material from both before and after the Mexican Revolution. Some of the images to be seen include a picture of Agustín de Iturbide, title pages and covers of various books about the Revolution, broadsides, papers and pictures of President William Howard Taft and other U.S. diplomats, sheet music covers, and cartoons. Eventually the site will include film footage.

 

“The 1988 Plebiscite in Chile: A Personal Experience” was presented by Amy Puryear. She was living in Chile at the time of the plebiscite and was able to collect a wide variety of material. The day of the plebiscite was a Sunday and there were to be no gatherings of any sort (including no mass to be celebrated) that day. As a result, the day ended up being quite calm. The plebiscite itself was basically a referendum on Augusto Pinochet and the result was 45 % was in favor of Pinochet with 55 % opposed. When asked for her opinion, Puryear always kept her responses neutral. As far as collecting material, Puryear was able to gather documents of varying lengths (from single sheets to copyrighted material), buttons, and other ephemeral material from all sides and all types of sources.

 

Donna Canevari de Paredes presented “Eva Perón, Published Memory and Human Rights: The Bibliographer as Memory Keeper”. Eva Perón has been a topic for publications of all sorts (including fiction, poetry, drama) in Argentina and elsewhere for a long time. Along with Eudoxio Paredes-Ruiz, Canevari de Paredes has developed a database of approximately 2500 entries. The material included concerns itself chiefly with Eva Perón and human rights. Some of the more specific topics include race, social welfare, labor, education, social issues and women’s rights. In addition to scholarly works, popular works and everything in between is included. Finally everything is evaluated in terms of the mythology surrounding Eva Perón (positive, negative, in-between) and its research value as related to human rights.

 

Paul Losch in his presentation “The Mystery of the Fake Filibusterer: Using Digital Newspaper Archives to Reconstruct a Hoax from 1895” was able to combine Philadelphia (our host city), Gainesville, (home of the University of Florida where he works) and Cuba (always of interest to SALALM). Frank Hann, a native of Philadelphia (who lived on Chancellor St. which was also the original street of our hotel) for a few months in 1895 manufactured his participation in the Cuban revolution. He filed news reports during for a 2-3 month period. Most of these were posted from Gainesville and were reported in the local paper. However, reports were also included in other newspapers, including the New York Times, but still with Gainesville mentioned as point of origin.

 

Questions & Comments:

 

David Dressing (University of Notre Dame) asked Losch whether other sources had been checked for later information about Hann. Losch said he had found a wealth of information from various websites and learned that Hann eventually married a woman from North Carolina. It also came out that Hann had wanted to impress people. The closest he came to military service was filling out a draft card at the time of World War I.

Bushnell noted that many of the genealogical websites are based in Utah; he asked if any were connected to the Church of the Latter Day Saints. Losch did not know.

Gayle Williams (Florida International University) remarked that when she worked at Emory, they had a subscription to ancestry.com which was loaded with information. Losch used ancestry.com at the local public library since the university did not subscribe.

 

Paula Covington remarked that a listing of the links to the newspaper websites could be put on a Libguide-type source and Losch said he would check into it. Canevari de Paredes added a microfilm list would also be useful.

Finally, Bushnell mentioned that back in 1990 he had earned good money by playing flute/piccolo/clarinet for a production of Evita.

 

SALALM LVI
Saturday, May 28, 2011 9:00-11:00am and Tuesday, May 31, 4:00-5:30pm

 

Members present: Richard Phillips, Paula Covington, David Block, Peter T. Johnson, Hortensia Calvo, Eudorah Loh, Martha Mantilla, Laura Shedenhelm, Angela Carreño, Alma Ortega, Anne Barnhart, Pamela Graham, Barbara Tenenbaum, Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez Others: Daisy V. Domínguez, Orchid Mazurkiewicz, Nerea Llamas, Lynn Shirey, Elmelinda Lara, David C. Murray, Joe Holub

 

Finance met twice in Philadelphia, covering a wide range of policy and fiscal matters and endowment/investment topics. Several new members were welcomed: Alma Ortega (San Diego), Angela Carreño (NYU), and Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez (Princeton). A goal of the Committee has been to broaden participation, so these newcomers were truly applauded!

 

A review of the organization’s future (short & long term) was given by Treasurer Peter Johnson and by the Executive Secretary Hortensia Calvo. Topics included boosting SALALM’s name at ALA accredited library/information schools (and recruitment of new personal memberships in SALALM) by the creation of a new scholarship to market SALALM and its benefits to new incoming professionals in our field. The longstanding Marietta Daniels Shepard Scholarship is being fully turned over to the University of Texas after more than 25 years of contributions by SALALM. This thus fulfills SALALM’s pledge. Frustration with the lack of recognition given to SALALM was voiced.

 

$1,000 (plus $500 for start-up publicity) will be taken from SALALM’s dividends to initially launch the new scholarship. Member donations will sustain it in the future. This new scholarship will be fully coordinated and promoted directly by SALALM to all library schools.

 

The Treasurer also touched upon SALALM investments, urging more vigilant and proactive work by Finance’s Investment Working Group (IWG) – which held an early working breakfast session and is coordinated by Laura Shedenhelm. Other topics included credit card fees, CPA charges, use of PayPal, updates to the SALALM website, webinar offerings. Other operating dynamics were also discussed and funded and these were sent on to the Executive Board for consideration and approval.

 

Additional business included receipt of a $1,000 boost to SALALM’s endowment from an anonymous donor, who thereby matched contributions from a challenge made to SALALM members at the end of the Providence meeting.  It is hoped that more challenges and donor opportunities will follow; SALALM’s “Endow our Future” theme is taking off.

 

Also, approval was given to offering a 3-year prepaid membership option that would lock in current membership fees.

 

Pending is the matter of changing SALALM operations to a calendar year in an effort to align SALALM with the fiscal year used by most others.  Also open for further review is the matter of moving more funds to the endowment from institutional sponsorship payments.

 

The Secretariat highlighted its current budget and proposed budget. Invoice processing of institutional members is being scrutinized; there is concern that there must be a smoother way for institutions to pay their bills to SALALM. Other matters were very positive reports from the Providence and Philadelphia conferences. Discussion of the 2012 Trinidad & Tobago conference was also upbeat, with projected expenses and revenues reviewed and local arrangements eyeing sponsorships. The new chair of Finance will be Paula Covington.

 

Richard Phillips, Chair
University of Florida

SALALM LVI
Saturday, May 28, 2011, 11:00 AM – 12:30pm

Attendees: Members: Laura D. Shedenhelm (University of Georgia); Paula Covington (Vanderbilt University); David Nolen (Mississippi State University) ; Richard Phillips, Peter S. Bushnell, Paul Losch ( University of Florida); Adan Benavides, David Block (University of Texas at Austin); Gayle Williams (Florida International University); Hortensia Calvo ( Tulane University); Sarah Buck Kachaluba (Florida State University); Meiyolet Méndez (University of Miami); Holly Ackerman (Duke University); Teresa Chapa (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Non-members: Tomás Bocanegra (Colegio de México); Gerada Holder (NALIS); Sofía Becerra-Licha (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill); Margarita Vannini (IHNCA, Universidad Centroamericana)

Teresa Chapa (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), the LASER Convener, opened the meeting by remarking on the gratifyingly large number of attendees. Introductions followed. A list was circulated for attendance and for those who want their names added to the LASER listserv.

Holly Ackerman moved that minutes of the last meeting be accepted. Laura Shedenhelm seconded and minutes were unanimously approved.
Teresa reminded the group that institutional updates will not be reviewed at the LASER meetings but will be sent out on the listserv.
Teresa announced that this was the 25th anniversary of ENLACE and encouraged our participation.

Teresa reviewed the themes from out last meeting – collaboration and cooperation in collection development. How to achieve greater coordination is the key. David Block summarized our efforts to date. In New Orleans we agreed to share information on whether we would purchase offers sent from one vendor for Andean publications. David pointed out that we do not need 12-20 copies of a work. Following the meeting in New Orleans, David sent out offers for collective consideration and we initially were indicating the intention to buy an item. It seemed that we were not reducing the number of institutions acquiring titles. As the experiment progressed we felt comfortable indicating that we would not buy an item. Gayle Williams asserted that it was still too early to judge the success of this experiment.

Richard Phillips questioned what the relationship of this experiment was to the Farmington Plan wherein universities had committed themselves to collecting along lines of faculty and institutional strength. Richard added that under the Farmington Plan, Florida has been committed to collecting on the Caribbean for so long that it would make no sense for them to alter that pattern or to reduce the amount they buy. Teresa pointed out that, in contrast to the Farmington commitments, our current efforts are regional rather than national and that they are informal. She reminded the group that we had also discussed dividing up deep collecting by choosing to collect comprehensively on selected Mexican states. Mai Mendez suggested that we also do this by publisher and/or state in Argentina. She offered to draw up a list of publishers derived from the approval plan from her university and to circulate it to LASER members.
David felt we needed more specificity as far as what our specialties include. Phil MacLeod suggested that we define a core and then divide up the more detailed subjects. Adan Benavides pointed out that some vendors’ catalogs, for example those from Books from Mexico, show which institutions have received a book on approval thus allowing us to see the extent to which a book is held in our region. Paula Covington thought that we need to focus on lists earlier in the selection process. David recommended that we organize around some benchmarks such as assuring that one institution has the national gazette and a major newspaper for each country. The need for coordination among SALALM’s regional groups was also discussed and Teresa Chapa agreed to talk with the conveners of the other regional groups to let them know what we are doing and to see what collaborative efforts they may have in place.
David suggested we select a country for which no LASER library has collecting responsibility and try a cooperative experiment to avoid overlap and to increase uniqueness. The possibility of a Central American country was discussed. Phil and Laura described the cooperative efforts they have in place with Emory buying in the social sciences and Georgia selecting in the Humanities. They compare invoices and identify duplication and core authors and subjects and are now coordinating their plans through Vientos Tropicales.
Laura agreed to coordinate an experiment on Paraguayan imprints. Participating institutions are Duke, Emory, Texas, U. Georgia, U. Miami, UNC. Laura will contact the group regarding next steps.
Paula reminded us that the LASER website is now at Vanderbilt and that she would like to receive suggestions on features to be added to the site. She demonstrated a website constructed in Omni software. She would like to convert the LASER page to an Omni format but does not want to do so unless other LASER institutions have OMNI so that the site can move to another institution with minimal difficulty. Members will check with their institution and report back to Paula. Suggestions for website additions included: a listing of digital libraries; a chart showing institutional collection strengths; acquisitions news; lists of OP vendors by country; and a LASER blog. Paula requested that members send updates to their microfilm union list this summer.
The meeting adjourned at 12:30.

 

Teresa Chapa, Convener
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

SALALM LVI
Saturday May 28, 2011 2:00-3:00pm

The subcommittee convened at 2:00 on Saturday May 28,2011  in the Cherry Room. The majority of the meeting’s time was devoted to product demonstrations.

Phil S. MacLeod (Emory) did a brief presentation about the Spanish language/Latin American content of the Google News Archive and showed a Lib Guide he put together at Emory with links to all the titles available (http://guides.main.library.emory.edu/content.php?pid=20775&sid=1657140).

David Block (U Texas) did a brief presentation about the Archivo Historico del Arzobispado de Mexico a scanned collection of documents of colonial church records.  Books from Mexico is the authorized dealer.

David Block recently attended the REDALYC meeting in Mexico and did a brief demonstration of the REDALYC portal (http://redalyc.uaemex.mx/) and discussed its content.

Ray Abruzzi (Gale Cengage) did a presentation on Gales’s World Scholar Latin American Portal describing the primary and secondary source content.

Paula Covington (Vanderbilt) gave a brief update on LAPOP.

There was also discussion of what would happen with the content of Paper of Record now that Google has discontinued the project.

 

Philip S. MacLeod, Chair
Emory University