Currently viewing the tag: "Barbara Alvarez"

Moderator:      Alison Hicks, University of Colorado, Boulder
Rapporteur:    Melissa Gasparotto, Rutgers University

Presenters
Paula Covington, Vanderbilt University
Latin American Digital Projects: Student, Faculty and Library Collaborations at Vanderbilt University

Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia
Because Learning Is Not Just for Students: Information Literacy for Faculty

Sarah Buck Kachaluba, Florida State University
Follow Up to “From Dub Assessment to Smart Assessment”: Adaptions for FSU Libraries

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
Tagging ASARO: A UNM Experiment in Crowd-Sourcing and Collection Development

Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York Libraries (CUNY)
Teach With Music

Molly E. Molloy, New Mexico State University
The Femicide Fallacy

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan
Don Quixote in English: A Chronology: A Digital Humanities Project for the Classroom

Paula presented on a Dean’s fellows program at Vanderbilt Libraries to pair advanced undergraduates and graduate students with a librarian mentor, usually to work on digitization projects (this can include metadata, digitizing, etc.). Many students end up using these digital collections when working on their dissertations, too.

She gave several examples of current fellows and their projects.

●       Helguera Collection of Colombiana
This Colombia-in-the-19th-century project includes descriptive thematic essays. The essays are done as a separate independent study. The collection includes broadsides, pamphlets and programas.
●       Oral histories from the Manuel Zapata Olivella Papers
Zapata Olivella was an Afro-Colombian novelist and anthropologist. The collection includes transcriptions of interviews with ancianos that students in colegios across Colombia interviewed. The hope is to add tapes at some point.
●       Ecclesiastical & Secular Sources for Slave Societies
This project digitally preserves Cuban, Colombian and Brazilian church and clerical documents relating to Africans and Afro-decedents. Among its uses is genealogy.

Anne Barnhart, University of West Georgia
Because Learning Is Not Just for Students: Information Literacy for Faculty

Anne presented on teaching information literacy workshops for faculty at University of West Georgia. She noted that faculty may have tunnel vision, and can be hard to reach with librarians’ information literacy message. They’re pulled in several directions already, but are also envious that librarians have the opportunity to go to conferences where they learn to teach and about new research in pedagogy. Anne established a workshop series called “GoodLibrations: Because learning is not just for students,” in response to this need. She provided food and alcohol as an incentive to attend.

Some of the topics included: leveraging Google apps, information ethics, using Adobe Creative Suite, practices for teaching critical thinking, Endnote, a celebration of faculty research that was especially popular, and a promotion & tenure dossier workshop. The topics were chosen by questionnaire.

Anne also helped plan and organized the Innovations in pedagogy conference, to address lack of pedagogy instruction for faculty. To help learn about how to teach faculty, she attended POD.

Sarah Buck Kachaluba, Florida State University
Follow Up to “From Dumb Assessment to Smart Assessment”: Adaptions for FSU Libraries

Sarah attended the “From Dumb Assessment to Smart Assessment” session at SALALM and got a lot out of it. She incorporated a version of that workshop into the FSU Libraries public services retreat. She developed 3 power points (active learning, writing student learning outcomes and one on assessment) that were heavily cribbed from Alison Hicks, Anne Barnhart, Meghan Lacey & AJ Johnson. She also developed templates for writing student outcomes for different disciplines. A few liaisons who did a lot of instruction found it very useful.

There were, however, limitations: some folks in mid management were pulled away in the middle and they would have benefitted. Moreover, nly public services librarians were there so some liaisons missed out.

Sarah detailed the ways she’s incorporated these strategies into her own instruction:

●       She’s started handing out worksheets for students to work in pairs to brainstorm resources they could use to find primary and secondary sources, and posting these worksheets on a wall so others could provide feedback. This didn’t work very well, so now she’s developed pre and post-session assessment handouts.

  • The pre- asks students why their research topics are and to identify things they want to learn during the session.
  • The post- asks for 1-3 things students learned and 1 thing they want to learn in the next sessions

She has gotten positive feedback from this
●       Sarah has also developed and taught a 3-hour session, where she used the worksheet again. This gave her productive feedback to use as they searched. She asked students to send her one resource they found during the session but few followed through.

The assessment workshop skills she learned have also helped her in other ways: she recently was able to help a colleague who needed to write student learning outcomes for a conference panel proposal.

Suzanne M. Schadl, University of New Mexico
Tagging ASARO: A UNM Experiment in Crowd-Sourcing and Collection Development

Suzanne talked about her work on the exhibit, Tagging ASARO: UNM experiment in crowd-sourcing and collection development (done with Mike Graham de la Rosa among others) at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

Various people were involved in the design of the exhibit, including Americorps interns who brought their own stenciling art skills to the installation because of how inspired they were by ASARO’s work.

ASARO: Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca  is participatory and about “getting up” and getting the word out. They use varied formats and venues. The goal of the exhibit was to transform and reframe work of this collective for the in the spirit of their own work but in a different context. The exhibit alters the context and creates dialogue – making connections between Oaxaca and Albuquerque. Suzanne has been working with Archive-it to archive digital files uploaded to ASARO website

The crowdsourcing element of the exhibit involved asking visitors to “tag” items using notecards. This was designed to foster community engagement with library. This crowdsourcing wasn’t so much about outsourcing descriptions and metadata but rather a “getting up” community response in the archives. (There was an issue with word “tag” and it’s multiple meanings. So it was important to encourage people to tag but not bring spray paint!)

There are going to be 5 community forums around the exhibit. The first one was a poetry slam with Nolan Eskeets. The tags and performances from this event are now part of this collection as well.

In two months they’ve had many cards posted, but nothing from the online component has been tagged. There is one place where comments not being posted. -The cave. This is in a different media format, so perhaps visitors are less able to interact with it than something in a frame on a wall.

Daisy V. Domínguez, The City College of New York Libraries (CUNY)
Teach With Music

Daisy observed that film is a preferred AV teaching tool in the classroom. She sent out a survey for Latin American Studies faculty on use of AV in LAS teaching. One professor suggested making a database, which she did using Omeka and it’s called Teach with Music. Currently it is hosted on her personal website: daisilla.org/omeka

The database includes titles of songs along with subjects, tags, a description, and how it can be used in education, all of which is contributed from LAS faculty. She demonstrated the usefulness of the database by playing some clips. One song about Oscar Romero has been used to talk about the church in a positive way via church activism. Another song, Zumbi by Jorge Ben, was suggested by a professor because it can be used to talk about plantation work by maroons, and the complexity of slave experience.

There are plans to connect this database to other databases like HAPI to help give thematic context to the themes explored in the songs.

Molly E. Molloy, New Mexico State University
The Femicide Fallacy

Molly presented about the news coverage about Juarez that has been dominated by femicide. She described the sensationalized coverage of sexualized murders of women in Juarez, arguing that this is not representative of the facts, and distracts from the problems facing the city. The picture is much more complicated that presented in the media because women are killed for a variety of reasons that may not have to do with their gender. She documented the various movies, books and pop culture references to the murders of women in Juarez, noting that much of the “information” available is speculation and not founded by reputable sources. The main book responsible for this perception is Cosecha de Mujeres, which brought the issue to public recognition, but the book is very poorly sourced.

Actual numbers reveal that a small percentage of homicides are women (9% of victims on average over 24 years). By comparison, in US that percentage is 22%. The Philadelphia Inquirer did an interactive database with charts of murders by gender, comparing Juarez and Philadelphia (because Philadelphia is similar in population). Juarez numbers are much higher for most years. However at the peak of hyper violence beginning in 2008, the rate really spikes incredibly. Women’s rates go up in tandem with men’s, however, not nearly as much. But both are higher than rates of murder in Philly. The murder rate spiked in 2008-2011, but is now on steep decline. In news articles searching, 9.2% of articles about Juarez are about femicide but in academic literature number that is 44%. The scholarly attention is out of proportion with reality.

There is a sense in the media that men killed in Juarez deserve it because they must be involved in narco-business, which is why there is so much less coverage of the hyperviolence that predominantly affects men.

Molly described many of the more commonly heard fallacies:

●       Thousands of factory girls have been raped mutilated, etc.

  1. 3/4 of deaths are domestic violence and only 12 out of 427 cases show mutilations

●       Since hyper violence began, women killed in same way that men are
●       Most of the women’s murders are unsolved because they are not cared about,

  • In truth there is a lack of prosecution across the board

She closed by reiterating that all of the lives lost in Juarez matter, not just women. All people are victims. Focusing on the deaths of women distracts and prevents people from dealing with the widespread slaughter of men and women.

Barbara Alvarez, University of Michigan
Don Quixote in English: A Chronology: A Digital Humanities Project for the Classroom

Barbara talked about the development of an online interactive chronology of translations of Don Quixote into English. At the University of Michigan, there are themed semesters. One semester the theme was language and translation, and the libraries and departments put on events to highlight that theme.

Barbara wanted to highlight the collections and also digital humanities with her project, so she developed a digital chronology project of the various editions of Don Quixote in English. It covers 1612 to the present day. For each entry they created bibliographic information with book cover images (if that title was available in their own collection), and linked to all editions of that particular translation available in the catalog. After the first version of the project, students worked to redesign it and augment it for usefulness. More features were added and the layout and design were made friendlier. A comparison feature was added in, which allows users to compare the original to various translations or to compare one translation to another. A bibliography was included as well, with information on various translations.

Gains from the project included:

●       Students were so engaged with and excited about the project.
●       Gaining new insights into the history of Don Quixote translations
●       Learning about research methods in Digital Humanities
●       See Digital Humanities in action through the Hispanic Baroque and The Cervantes Project
●       Learning about web design and accessibility
●       Having a librarian embedded in the course

QUESTIONS
None

Panel 19, June 19, 2012, 11:00am-12:30pm
Moderator: Alison Hicks (University of Colorado, Boulder)
Presenters: Samuel Wicks (University of Pittsburgh); Tina Gross (St. Cloud State University); Sarah G. Wenzel (University of Chicago); Carolyn Palaima (The University of Texas at Austin); Laura Shedenhelm (University of Georgia); Barbara Alvarez (University of Michigan)
Rapporteur: Lisa Gardinier (University of Iowa)

Slides: http://salalm.org/2012/06/23/pecha-kucha-2012/

Alison Hicks introduced the presenters and explained the pecha kucha format. Generally speaking, pecha kucha presentations are 20 slides for 20 seconds each for a presentation of 6 minutes and 40 seconds.

In the first presentation, “What Digital Collection? Issues of Collection Development, Cataloging Trends and Standards, and Ethical Considerations of Underground Music in the Caribbean and Latin America,” Samuel Wicks explored initial considerations in planning a digital collection for Latin American punk music. A collection such as the one proposed potentially includes media in a variety of formats, including text, images, audio, and video, from a variety of original carriers, including audio cassettes, vinyl records, ephemera, and fan zines. Wicks discussed open source digital collection management software, briefly reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of systems in relation to this project, including Archon, DSpace, ICA-AtoM, and Greenstone. Ultimately, CONTENTdm provides the most robust platform capable of handling audio and video files in addition to text and images, as well as allowing the creation of compound documents to group related items. Wicks created a “materials and techniques” metadata elements to more adequately describe objects such as album covers. Wicks also looked for other punk collections. He found a variety of projects, such as museum exhibits in Slovenia and Reno, Nevada; the Fugazi Live Series with the support of the original band; and fan-created digital collections like Killed by Death Records and Kill from the Heart. Finally, Wicks briefly discussed the challenge of identifying and obtaining copyright permission from members of sometimes obscure punk bands that have not been active since the early 1980s.

Because Wicks had to leave for the airport immediately after his presentation, there was a short question and answer period before moving on to the next presenter.

Miguel Valladares-Llata (University of Virginia) asked about the availability of the presentation. Hicks confirmed that she would post the presenters’ slides on the SALALM blog.

Laura D. Shedenhelm (University of Georgia) asked if links would be included. [At the time of writing this report, the slides have been posted on the SALALM blog, but links have not been compiled and posted.]

Meagan Lacy (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis) commented that her library had difficulty identifying the copyright owners of a journal included in a digital collection. The journal itself did not include any copyright information. The library chose to post the content with a note that the copyright holder should contact the library and the library would remove the material if requested. Wicks commented that a similar practice is commonly seen on YouTube, in which content is posted with a note that the person posting the material does not own it, does not intend to profit from it, and will remove it if requested.

An unidentified librarian from NALIS commented that Greenstone is capable of handling audio files, as the NALIS Digital Library runs on Greenstone and includes mp3 files, notably in the storytelling collection. [Wicks later verified that the version of Greenstone he used was not capable of supporting audio files.]

Kumaree Ramtahal (University of the West Indies, St. Augustine) asked Wicks to elaborate on the process of uploading video in DSpace. Wicks used KeepVid to extract a file from YouTube and other streaming video.

In the second presentation, “Developing Local Cataloging Procedures for Access to Foreign-Language Films,” Tina Gross discussed providing better access to foreign films for patrons. Standard cataloging practice focuses on the physical object which, in the case of films, describes the location of the publisher, not the production of the original film. Patrons looking for foreign film, however, frequently want to search by country of production. Two new MARC fields, 257 and 044, have been introduced to capture “Country of Publishing/Producing Entity.” However, many integrated library systems are not configured to include that as a searchable field. Further, many OPACs do not distinguish between the MARC coding for the primary language of the film and the subtitles, making it difficult to search for a film based on its original language. Gross and the staff of the St. Cloud State University Library reasoned that activating the search functionality of the new MARC fields or language coding was a low priority for their ILS vendor, especially with the impending implementation of RDA, but still an important search strategy for their patrons. Gross and her colleagues chose to add local subject headings in the 655 genre/form fields:

  • Foreign language films – Language.

  • Motion pictures – Country.

These headings are browseable in the old catalog interface and appear as genres in the next-generation catalog with faceted search capabilities.

Sarah G. Wenzel followed with her presentation, “Patron- or Demand-Driven Acquisition: Strategies for Successful Implementation.” At Chicago, selectors were allowed to implement patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) however they best saw fit for their collections and patrons. This case-by-case implementation was chosen to foster support and buy-in from the selectors. Wenzel and her colleagues were seeking solutions to three primary questions: how to supplement selection without a budget increase, how to streamline and speed up selection, and how to serve faculty and other patrons who normally have little or no contact with the selector. The PDA program has not changed existing approval plans but adds a new approach to slips titles, or titles that are not completely peripheral to the collection but not core titles either. In Wenzel’s experience, this has not interfered with purchasing and she has made titles available by PDA rather than adding them to a desiderata list. Slips profiles have required some tweaking. Wenzel gave the science collections as an example in that they added “how-to” titles for programming languages, which they normally do not purchase but there is a point-of-need demand. Other selectors have imposed price limits on purchases and budget ceilings on call number ranges to preserve their existing budgeting patterns. Wenzel and other selectors use usage and PDA purchase statistics available through Ebrary to inform purchases, especially in fields in which they have little contact with faculty and students. Since records for PDA titles are loaded in the online catalog, purchases are not constrained by the availability of the paper book, but can be bought on demand, be it tomorrow or in five years. If a publisher ceases to offer their content by PDA but the library has already bought it, the library does not lose access, as opposed to the risk of losing content in a leased collection. Overall, selectors at Chicago who have participated in the PDA program and have spent the time to tailor their profiles have been happy with the program. Chicago would like to see more vendors offer PDA purchasing as the practice enriches the library’s catalog and provides greater access to patrons.

 

In the next presentation, “Collaborative Digital Archiving: A Non-Custodial Approach,” Carolyn Palaima discussed the Primeros Libros project as a case study. In this project, the University of Texas at Austin has worked with Texas A&M University and the Biblioteca Lafragua of the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla to digitize New World incunabula, beginning with those published in Mexico. The collection is defined, also the first step in building a digital collection, as books printed in the New World before 1601, of which there are 220 known titles and 136 known to still exist. Primeros Libros’ initial focus are those printed in Mexico and to include as many exemplars of each work as possible. The next step in such a project is to identify lead partners in content, technical aspects, and digital preservation. University of Texas and Texas A&M are the initial partners, with 16 and 18 primeros libros respectively. The main Mexican partner, the Biblioteca Lafragua, was chosen more for its willingness to commit to the project than for its holdings. Initial content partners had as little as one item to contribute to the project. Scanning standards were developed by University of Texas  and Texas A&M. The project website with access to the complete collection was designed and is hosted by University of Texas. In terms of digital preservation, the TIFF images are stored with the Texas Digital Libraries Preservation Network and the Repositorio Digital Mexicano. All partner institutions receive a complete collection of TIFF and/or derivative images. The primary documentation for partnership is the project agreement and the digitization standards. Both are available in English or Spanish on the Primeros Libros website. Both University of Texas and Texas A&M set up scanning stations and trained staff to digitize their collections of primeros libros. A mobile scanning station was set up in Puebla with trained staff, which can travel to other content partners in Mexico. Other content partners are brought into the project based on institutional holdings. The project is non-custodial as materials do not have to be physically acquired by the organizing institution, digitization takes place locally, each partner receives a complete collection of the digital images, and the framework of the project can be adapted to the needs of participating collections. The project achieves a consolidated collection of dispersed holdings, allowing comparison of copies across institutions, and demonstrates international collaboration. University of Texas has used the non-custodial model in previous digital collections, notably the Human Rights Documentation Initiative and the Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive (AHPN).

Links:

 

The following presentation, “Library Outreach Using Library a la Carte (TM)” by Laura D. Shedenhelm discussed adapting selective dissemination of information (SDI) as a value-added service to Library à la Carte, an open-source content management system intended for subject and course library guides. Shedenhelm learned SDI in library school and used it early in her career in law firm libraries. In her current position as the Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain, and Portugal, she has used it to open lines of communication to faculty and students by capturing content about Latin America, Spain, and Portugal in otherwise general works, especially those that are not classed in the usual F and PQ call number ranges. While some of these titles would be readily apparent from scanning the New Titles List, the link for that list is a small one on the library catalog. Many of the chapters in other general works are searchable unless the table of contents is listed in a catalog record and are delayed in their inclusion in index databases. Shedenhelm used to gather new titles and relevant chapters in a document that she e-mailed to her liaison departments but she now maintains a Library à la Carte page, “Spanish & Portuguese: New Works in the Libraries.” Once a month she creates a list of the newest material and saves the old list as attached files, which are available for a year.

 

In the final presentation, “Publish, Not Perish! Supporting Graduate Students as Publishing Authors,” Barbara Alvarez discussed a workshop on publishing for graduate students. Alvarez and a colleague observed that they saw graduate students mostly early in their studies and less as they progressed. They felt, however, that research was only the beginning and they could offer support through the publishing process as well. While publish-or-perish is often associated with junior faculty, it creates anxiety amongst graduate students as well, who are concerned with making themselves competitive in a shrinking academic job market. Graduate students, though, may be reluctant to ask for advice from their professors and senior faculty may be decades removed from the experience of publishing as an early-career scholar. University of Michigan Libraries now house the University of Michigan Press as a department within the libraries, including MPublishing, which provides publishing consultation services and employs publishing outreach librarians, providing a natural partner for this project. Alvarez and her colleagues first began with a survey to find if such a workshop was needed and to identify what questions students have about the publishing process. The survey reported interest from students at all stages of graduate studies, including beginning students. Working from the survey results, they sought to address the following in a one-hour workshop:

  • the current publishing environment with information on Open Access and authors’ rights (covered by publishing consultants)

  • what and when to publish (covered by an invited junior faculty member with a strong publishing record)

  • how to select journals and publishers (covered by Alvarez)

  • how to respond to reviewers’ feedback

Future plans include open sessions available to students in all disciplines on general issues such as authors’ rights and sharing the workshop model with subject librarians to create discipline-specific workshops. Overall, the workshop was well-received. Alvarez and her colleagues concluded that it makes sense for librarians to be involved in the publishing process as an extension of research training. Graduate students may find the rapidly changing publishing environment to be overwhelming but it is a natural topic for librarians to keep up with. The workshop also supports change in academic publishing by educating young scholars about Open Access and their rights as authors.

Link:

Questions & Comments:

Palaima asked Alvarez if the LibGuide is freely available. Alvarez replied that it is.

Anne Barnhart (University of West Georgia) asked if Alvarez had worked with faculty, as she has noticed that faculty need guidance on publishing strategy as well. Alvarez replied that they are especially hoping to attract faculty to the discipline-specific and focused topic workshops. Faculty present a lot of opportunity for this program, such as inviting currently active faculty for informal, focused conversation with their colleagues and graduate students.

Meagan Lacy asked Alvarez what departments were represented in the graduate students who attended the workshop. Alvarez replied that the initial workshop focused on Romance Languages and Literatures students as an experiment. They are planning to talk with other subject librarians to share details and offer the survey for reuse, with hopes that others will approach their respective departments.

Alison Hicks asked Shedenhelm if her lists on Library à la Carte are available by RSS. Shedenhelm replied that it is available through the UGA Libraries website and is freely available. It takes her about 20 minutes each month to create the lists. Meagan Lacy asked if Shedenhelm manually compiles the lists or generates them through an automated process. Shedenhelm replied that she types the lists.

Margarita Vannini (Instituto de Historia de Nicaragua y Centroamérica) asked Palaima to elaborate on the institutional relationships involved in digitizing the AHPN collection. Palaima replied that the AHPN was a very large project with lots of people working on it. The archive is approximately 80 million pages. Agreements signed with the AHPN require open access. Digitization was done on-site in Guatemala. UT sent hard drives which were returned full. The first batch was 11,000 documents which were sent to the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) to be processed into TIFF files and derivatives. The site launched in December has sparse metadata but is open access. It is structured much the same as the physical archive, with documents organized by provenance and original order. Researchers can browse the digital archive by year, much as they would do with boxes of documents. There is currently no metadata for names and places. UT is expecting another 10 million documents and is working with the TACC to extract metadata the document images. This is challenging because of different handwriting, formats, and other variables throughout the collection. It has been a major collaboration over a long period of time. As soon as the website went live it received heavy traffic.

Rafael E. Tarragó (University of Minnesota) asked Palaima if Primeros Libros is limited to New Spain or if it includes all of Latin America. Early publishing also took place in Peru. Palaima replied that choices were made at the beginning of the project to limit the initial collection to Mexico. They hope to expand the collection geographically in the future.

Hicks asked Wenzel if Chicago’s PDA program included print or just e-books. Wenzel responded that it is currently just e-books. One factor in that decision is the speed of delivery and that it is currently faster to deliver materials through interlibrary loan or unmediated consortial borrowing. It is unclear if PDA for print would be an improvement in service.

Alvarez asked Wenzel if PDA records are loaded after a title-by-title selection or if they are loaded in a large batch of PDA records. Wenzel replied that PDA titles are loaded by batch based on the refined slips profile she has set partly based on subject headings. For example, she does not purchase language learning or ESL materials so those records are excluded from any PDA batch load.